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How Hard Is It To Find A Job? How Easy Is It To Find A Job? What Type Of Jobs?


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jonasdatum's Avatar
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12-Dec-2006, 04:58 PM #1
How Hard Is It To Find A Job? How Easy Is It To Find A Job? What Type Of Jobs?
I figured this was a topic everybody can relate to no matter what walk of life you're from? So I'll start off. I am looking for another job. I've applied multiple times online for positions @ some major entities. Unfortunately I've worked only one job. I've looked online and in newspapers. Any suggestions?

Last edited by jonasdatum; 13-Dec-2006 at 11:13 AM..
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12-Dec-2006, 05:05 PM #2
Depends on how good you are and who you know. If you're good and you know the right people, it's easy to find a job. If not, it's harder.
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12-Dec-2006, 05:16 PM #3
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonasdatum
I figured this we a topic everybody can relate to no matter what walk of life you're from? So I'll start off. I looking for another job. I've applied multiple times online for positions @ some major entities. Unfortunately I've worked only one job. I've looked online and in newspapers. Any suggestions?
Yes--the odds of getting a job by replying to adds or online are very small due to the volume of people. What you should do is call potential employers--find out who the person in charge of hiring is and speak with that person--you will be guaranteed to hit on someone who has yet to advertise a position but wants to hire someone--some may create a position for you if they like you. Trust me--none of us like to post adds and do interviews--if someone "falls in my lap" that I like and is qualified, I will hire them rather than running an add and interviewing--it is VERY EASY to get a job this way, but very hard for people to do it because most people are embarrassed or not pushy enough.
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12-Dec-2006, 05:19 PM #4
Move to Texas. If you can't find a job here, you're qualified for California.
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12-Dec-2006, 05:44 PM #5
In KY...the jobs in IT are plentiful -- competition can be high at times...but then, that goes with the territory

Healthcare and education are also plentiful
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12-Dec-2006, 08:38 PM #6
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonasdatum
I figured this we a topic everybody can relate to no matter what walk of life you're from? So I'll start off. I looking for another job. I've applied multiple times online for positions @ some major entities. Unfortunately I've worked only one job. I've looked online and in newspapers. Any suggestions?
If you send out a resume you might want to attach a letter of introduction. Businesses have so many applications to go through they may not be able to read them all. A good letter will get their attention and generate more interest in the resume.http://career.clemson.edu/students/p...troduction.pdf

Also, in some instances going directly to the business may help. Even if they aren't hiring you can fill out an application.

Just a couple of ideas. They may or may not be beneficial in your job hunt.

Good luck!
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12-Dec-2006, 08:42 PM #7
Tips for a resume start with what you did like I saved a company $50,000 that will get them to read more and you get a better chance as all the do is skim over it If nothing catches there eye its tossed.
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12-Dec-2006, 10:40 PM #8
1. Review the net, books, articles, etc. on best/recommended means to (a) put your qualifications and you yourself in best light, (b) polish resume &/or cover letter, and (c) find the job in the areas [areas being type of job AND location] you want to work.

2. Put resume on monster and other net sites - let the recruiters and firms seek you, while you are...

3. Hitting the pavement, making cold calls to HR managers [as suggested by Mulder], contact recruiting firms [especially ones that have their fingers in your particular job/market], networking via social and/or professional organizations, and letting your friends and family know you are searching.

4. Be patient. Have confidence, w/o being cocky. Be honest. Expand your knowledge, both in your field of interest, and in others that might be of potential.

5. During interviews, show passion for what you do, and for what you want to do - especially during interviews. Smile - show that you are a person, a human, w/ talent and ability and desire to not only do what is on the position description, but will have ability to expand into other areas, as a valuable team player. Demonstrate that what you bring to the table is not only unique and of high quality, but of such value that w/o you on their payroll, they would potentially miss out on opportunity to really kick arse.

Good luck!




ps: this is from person who just got word this afternoon from a headhunter that another firm is 'highly interested' in making an offer...
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13-Dec-2006, 08:44 AM #9
I recommend the following books (check your local library first, and local book stores - they make good Christmas presents, so put them on your list!):
1) "What Color Is Your Parchute"? (2007 edition) as a practical manual for job-hunters and career changers,
2) "Where Do I Go From Here With My Life", and
3) "The Three Boxes of Life: And How To Get Out of Them" all by Richard N. Bolles, and
4) "Zen and the Art of Making a Living" (2nd Ed.) by Laurence G. Boldt.
Note: I'd go with 1) and 4) and followup with 2) and 3) later on.

The bottom line is to decide what you want to do first, where you want to do it second, and with whom you want to work third. That taks a lot of self-exploration to understand your skills - i.e. what you offer to employers that is of value to solve their business problems, research job openings in companies, and brushing up on your communication skills such a a 30 second intro to who you are and what you do to someone you are meeting for the first time. Remember, you only get one chance to make a good first impression!

Networking with others in the same profession is a tried and true method of finding work. If you have a network of friends, let them know you are looking for work of a specific kind and ask if they know of any openings for such work - and ask for their help in finding that work in terms of advice, etc. And don't forget to keep in touch with them to maintain the networking ties. Note: When you meet people, ask for their busines card, and if you have one yourself, exchange them.

If you can link up with someone on the inside and develop a contact through your networking to get information on who the hiring manager is and let the inside contact introduce you through your resume and cover letter to that hiring manager, you have a much better chance of at least getting an interview. From there on its up to you to SELL your skills and self (team work, etc.) or whatever is required to fullfill the requirements of the published job description (internal or external).

Best of luck,

-- Tom

P.S. Forget about posting your resume on websites. Most jobs are screened by computers looking for key words, and if you don't have all of the relevant key words on your resume, you won't even get considered. So, make a major part of your research to determine what key words are important to the job you are seeking and include them on your resume from the work that you have done.
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Last edited by lotuseclat79; 13-Dec-2006 at 08:50 AM..
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13-Dec-2006, 08:53 AM #10
Quote:
Originally Posted by lotuseclat79
P.S. Forget about posting your resume on websites. Most jobs are screened by computers looking for key words, and if you don't have all of the relevant key words on your resume, you won't even get considered. So, make a major part of your research to determine what key words are important to the job you are seeking and include them on your resume from the work that you have done.
Actually, that may be the key if you have the time to acquire a new credential while searching. If looking in the IT world, an MCSE or Cisco certification is golden. Having experience with other tools, SMS, Exchange, OpenView, TNG, etc. will help for specific jobs where those skills are a priority.

The day that I updated my resume to include MCSE, I started getting calls instead of having to make calls. I was fortunate to have SMS experience and the job I got needed that but was searching only for MCSEs.

Good Luck!
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14-Jan-2007, 07:38 AM #11
Quote:
Originally Posted by poochee
If you send out a resume you might want to attach a letter of introduction. Businesses have so many applications to go through they may not be able to read them all. A good letter will get their attention and generate more interest in the resume.http://career.clemson.edu/students/p...troduction.pdf

Also, in some instances going directly to the business may help. Even if they aren't hiring you can fill out an application.

Just a couple of ideas. They may or may not be beneficial in your job hunt.

Good luck!
I believe you're talking about a "cover letter." I have friends and asscoiates with higher paying jobs. To help, many have sent copies of their resumes to me. The format isn't no big thing, but they have things that I don't:

1) A BA/BS or higher: Working on it. I refer you to my "military thread."
2) Extensive work history: Need work... "refer you to my "military thread."
3) Social Networking: I am working on it.

Now granted my limited experience doesn't afford me much; That wouldn't be realistic. However, within the range of my experience I should qualify for "something" decent. For the record, I am not working in a fast food place unless it there is the title "owner" or "manager" in front of my name!
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14-Jan-2007, 12:38 PM #12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ciberblade
In KY...the jobs in IT are plentiful -- competition can be high at times...but then, that goes with the territory

Healthcare and education are also plentiful
Do you mean that there are a lot of jobs in healthcare and education or that Kentucky has a lot of sick stupid people?
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15-Jan-2007, 12:28 AM #13
another place to look is the job services at the local unemployment office
jonasdatum's Avatar
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08-Mar-2007, 05:53 AM #14
Hello, look @ all perspective here is one possible job/career you may be interested in:

http://www.secretservice.gov/index.shtml

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES
Uniformed Division Officer
http://www.secretservice.gov/opportunities_ud.shtml

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES
Special Agent
http://www.secretservice.gov/opportunities_agent.shtml

So if you're just out of college, a cop, former military, high school,etc. Also, following up a line from an old associate from college. Suggest you do the same. As someone already posted, breaking into an industry and establishing contacts (networking) is the best way to find one. Problem is "breaking into the industry."
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15-Mar-2007, 09:27 PM #15
www.c-span.org March 15 2007
rtsp://video.c-span.org/15days/wj031507.rm

This Washington Journal touches on many thread topics [including this one], watch it, learn something...
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