Advertisement

There's no such thing as a stupid question, but they're the easiest to answer.
Login
Search

Advertisement

Controversial Topics Controversial Topics
Search Search
Search for:
Tech Support Guy > > >

What are we Calling Economics These days..


(!)

buffoon's Avatar
Community Moderator with 19,166 posts.
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Spain
Experience: comfortably numb
30-Dec-2011, 09:14 AM #61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bastiat View Post
......................... "Economics is the study of the use of scare resources which have alternative uses.".................
Thank you.
Ent's Avatar
Ent   (Josiah) Ent is offline Ent is a Trusted Advisor with special permissions.
Computer Specs
Trusted Advisor with 5,289 posts.
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: United Kingdom
Experience: Intermediate
30-Dec-2011, 09:16 AM #62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bastiat View Post
Consider the classic definition of economics as presented by Lionel Robbins, a British economist: "Economics is the study of the use of scare resources which have alternative uses."
If only. Economics is the study of how humans use scarce resources which have alternative uses.
Two words changed, and the world of a difference made.
buffoon's Avatar
Community Moderator with 19,166 posts.
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Spain
Experience: comfortably numb
30-Dec-2011, 09:25 AM #63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ent View Post
If only. Economics is the study of how humans use scarce resources which have alternative uses.
Two words changed, and the world of a difference made.
At the risk of becoming hair-splittingly tedious (or tediously hair-splitting?), wouldn't that rather fall into the field of sociology? Even when considering that there's hardly any other than human use for scarce resources in this context?
Ent's Avatar
Ent   (Josiah) Ent is offline Ent is a Trusted Advisor with special permissions.
Computer Specs
Trusted Advisor with 5,289 posts.
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: United Kingdom
Experience: Intermediate
30-Dec-2011, 09:46 AM #64
It is a social science is it not?

I've never encountered the quote Bastiat referred to, but this one seems to be by the same Lionel Robbins.
"Economics is the science which studies human behavior as a relationship between given ends and scarce means which have alternative uses" Link Link, Emphasis mine.
And if anyone can wrap their head around THAT...

Last edited by Ent; 30-Dec-2011 at 10:09 AM..
buffoon's Avatar
Community Moderator with 19,166 posts.
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Spain
Experience: comfortably numb
30-Dec-2011, 12:53 PM #65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ent View Post
It is a social science is it not?
tis indeed.
Quote:
I've never encountered the quote Bastiat referred to, but this one seems to be by the same Lionel Robbins.
"Economics is the science which studies human behavior as a relationship between given ends and scarce means which have alternative uses" Link Link, Emphasis mine.
it did sound a bit incomplete as to original wording
Quote:
And if anyone can wrap their head around THAT..
Methinks that what the heads need to be wrapped around firstly is that stressing of behavior comprises a fallacy. No doubt behavior plays a significant role in historical example (exemplification) but economics does not concern itself with behaviorism (something that would lie more (belong) in the field of physics or biology).

"Economics" is fundamentally normative.
__________________
Human affairs are not so happily arranged that the best things please the most men. Therefore it is often the sign of a bad cause when it is applauded by the mob. ----Seneca----
Ent's Avatar
Ent   (Josiah) Ent is offline Ent is a Trusted Advisor with special permissions.
Computer Specs
Trusted Advisor with 5,289 posts.
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: United Kingdom
Experience: Intermediate
30-Dec-2011, 01:18 PM #66
If indeed Economics were fundamentally normative, shouldn't positive economics be a contradiction?

I think it is foolish to try to seperate economics from behaviour, though I don't think it has anything much to do with behaviourism. Production, trading and consumption are behaviours. Etherial things like "economic growth" are individual people deciding to make a bit more.
buffoon's Avatar
Community Moderator with 19,166 posts.
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Spain
Experience: comfortably numb
30-Dec-2011, 02:28 PM #67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ent View Post
If indeed Economics were fundamentally normative, shouldn't positive economics be a contradiction?
I didn't advocate that "fundamentally" should mean "exclusively". Nevertheless "positive economics" functions as a descriptionary (analytical) instrument. It is a branch of economics (as the article states) not a different school.
Quote:
I think it is foolish to try to seperate economics from behaviour, though I don't think it has anything much to do with behaviourism. Production, trading and consumption are behaviours. Etherial things like "economic growth" are individual people deciding to make a bit more.
Again, I did not advocate separation. I advocate stressing of relevant parameters in their order of pertinence. Or,let me try to phrase that in a better way, that human behavior, integral to the issue, not be identified in a socio-politico-ideological manner so often seen on here. "CEOs are greedy which leads them to destroy jobs for greater profit, capitalism is bad, corporations are power hungry etc."

No doubt there are plenty of instances of all of these but they're better addressed at a Party rant rather than be used to pretend knowledge of economics. Because "human behavior" is otherwise conveniently misunderstood in its role in the overall picture.

Science (and I often flippantly claim that any economist worth his salt will deny economy that tag) invariably gets invaded by ideology. It's unavoidable I guess, but, until that invasion is repelled, the discipline ceases temporarily to be scientific.
Ent's Avatar
Ent   (Josiah) Ent is offline Ent is a Trusted Advisor with special permissions.
Computer Specs
Trusted Advisor with 5,289 posts.
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: United Kingdom
Experience: Intermediate
30-Dec-2011, 05:08 PM #68
Oh dear. I can't seem to find anything to disagree with.
aka Brett's Avatar
Account Disabled with 16,918 posts.
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
30-Dec-2011, 05:12 PM #69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ent View Post
Oh dear. I can't seem to find anything to disagree with.
Scour through ekim68s posts
Theres a plenty


Last edited by aka Brett; 30-Dec-2011 at 05:25 PM..
buffoon's Avatar
Community Moderator with 19,166 posts.
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Spain
Experience: comfortably numb
30-Dec-2011, 05:21 PM #70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ent View Post
Oh dear. I can't seem to find anything to disagree with.
There's times for feeling and times for thinking. I get the impression that, unlike some others, you tend to see the difference.

Either that or Christmas has aged you to the point of mellowing.
Bastiat's Avatar
Member with 5,431 posts.
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
30-Dec-2011, 05:46 PM #71
Quote:
Originally Posted by buffoon View Post
There's times for feeling and times for thinking. I get the impression that, unlike some others, you tend to see the difference.
Well if you like I can post something to stir things up a bit.
buffoon's Avatar
Community Moderator with 19,166 posts.
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Spain
Experience: comfortably numb
30-Dec-2011, 06:07 PM #72
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bastiat View Post
Well if you like I can post something to stir things up a bit.
No doubt about that.
Littlefield's Avatar
Member with 13,532 posts.
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
30-Dec-2011, 07:38 PM #73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bastiat View Post
Getting back to the opening premise of this thread:



No basic economics has not changed and never will. Consider the classic definition of economics as presented by Lionel Robbins, a British economist: "Economics is the study of the use of scare resources which have alternative uses."

If you can wrap your brain around that definition and its implications you are doing better then second year econ majors at the University of Chicago. What is being discussed in the article posted in the opening post is an attempt to politicize and/or social engineer economic theory............guarantee to be a failure. Think about the quote above.
I agree and we have more a service economy now as in churn and need to start producing more than we consume .
Littlefield's Avatar
Member with 13,532 posts.
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
30-Dec-2011, 08:01 PM #74
Quote:
Originally Posted by bastiat View Post
well if you like i can post something to stir things up a bit.
lol
ekim68's Avatar
ekim68   (Mike) ekim68 is online now
Member with 45,284 posts.
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Eugene, Oregon
30-Dec-2011, 11:10 PM #75
Quote:
Originally Posted by buffoon View Post
I keep forgetting that this whole thing is more about "feel" and less about "know".

And since you apparently also feel better with leaving the rest of my post unaddressed, why should I not feel the same?
You know, you're right.... I think I misinterpreted this thread, I'll move along now....
As Seen On

BBC, Reader's Digest, PC Magazine, Today Show, Money Magazine
WELCOME TO TECH SUPPORT GUY!

Are you looking for the solution to your computer problem? Join our site today to ask your question. This site is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations.

If you're not already familiar with forums, watch our Welcome Guide to get started.


Tags
debate, economics

(clock)
THIS THREAD HAS EXPIRED.
Are you having the same problem? We have volunteers ready to answer your question, but first you'll have to join for free. Need help getting started? Check out our Welcome Guide.

Search Tech Support Guy

Find the solution to your
computer problem!




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools


WELCOME
You Are Using: Server ID
Trusted Website Back to the Top ↑

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2