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Glue/Sealant for stove pipe


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Shamrock's Avatar
Shamrock Shamrock is offline
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26-Sep-2006, 04:35 PM #1
Glue/Sealant for stove pipe
There is a slit in the side of a stove pipe. Is there some type of sealant you can buy that will work on a pipe that gets very hot?
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26-Sep-2006, 04:48 PM #2
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shamrock
There is a slit in the side of a stove pipe. Is there some type of sealant you can buy that will work on a pipe that gets very hot?
Yes .... but you would probably be safer replacing the pipe ..

What kinda stove and what kinda pipe?
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26-Sep-2006, 05:56 PM #3
It is a pipe on the roof of the house...from the gas hot water heater/gas stove.
Easier to seal if can find something that works.
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26-Sep-2006, 06:07 PM #4
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shamrock
It is a pipe on the roof of the house...from the gas hot water heater/gas stove.
Easier to seal if can find something that works.
Plastic or metal?
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Shamrock Shamrock is offline
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26-Sep-2006, 06:14 PM #5
It's metal.
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26-Sep-2006, 07:28 PM #6
You can buy heavy duty aluminum duct tape at most home improvement stores. You could also use some type of patch or putty made for repairing auto mufflers easily found at most auto parts stores.

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27-Sep-2006, 03:16 AM #7
Please be very careful about researching/understanding the type of vent/exhaust pipe it is first. It may be a "pipe within a pipe" in order to keep extreme heat from causing a potential fire hazard, as the vent pipe passes thru your roof. Patching the exterior of the outside of this kind of vent pipe could prove very dangerous, as you may have an interior pipe split also, and if so, patching the outside pipe, may hide this danger, and could possibly lead to a house/roof fire this winter.
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27-Sep-2006, 04:29 AM #8
If it's a hole caused by corrosion replace it and while you're at it thoroughly check the integrity of the rest of the sections. A problem in one section can be indicative of problems in others. Flues and exhaust vents are not something to mess around with.
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02-Oct-2006, 07:04 PM #9
You can also do like in the cartoons and plug the hole with a piece of used chewing gum.... ha ha ha.

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03-Oct-2006, 12:50 AM #10
Many silicon sealers (RTV types) will stand up to 600F.

But I also urge extreme caution, you need to know why it's happened etc. Insurance liabilities also come to mind if you repair it and there is a fire following the event.
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03-Oct-2006, 08:20 AM #11
Quote:
Originally Posted by thecoalman
If it's a hole caused by corrosion replace it and while you're at it thoroughly check the integrity of the rest of the sections. A problem in one section can be indicative of problems in others. Flues and exhaust vents are not something to mess around with.
My thoughts exactly .. Time to call in a certified expert.
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12-Oct-2006, 09:49 AM #12
I would replace it. In order to be "up to code", the pipe needs to be "dual-walled" - basically meaning there's a smaller pipe inside the bigger, outer pipe. This is so that as it's passing through the roof, the inner pipe can generally be hotter than the outer pipe, without a risk of fire.
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12-Oct-2006, 10:08 AM #13
Auto stores sell a fiberglass/epoxy patch for mufflers that might work, but I agree for safety reasons I would replace the pipe. If its a simple stovepipe then a new one would be cheaper then the repair.
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