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Multiple Hard drive problems


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Digitalsoju's Avatar
Digitalsoju Digitalsoju is offline
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10-May-2012, 10:54 AM #1
Angry Multiple Hard drive problems
Lately Iíve been having multiple hard drive problems and it's really bugging me. The first few times I chalked it up to bad luck, but now I really think it's not a coincidence.

Some quick background information:
-About a year ago (May 2011), I built a new computer with all new parts.
-I currently work overseas (South Korea), but when I was back home in the US, I bought my computer parts there because they are much cheaper.


-First drive was a Western Digital 2 TB Caviar Black. I bought this in January of 2011 in the US. This drive got really slow, it took over a second to load an mp3 file, transfer rates were less than 1 mb/s. Eventually it couldnít pass some hard drive tests so I sent this back and got a replacement.

-Second drive was a 2 TB Seagate Barracuda drive (bought this drive in March 2012 in South Korea). This one simply started making an annoying noise after 2 weeks. It passed all the hard drive tests using Seagateís hard drive diagnostic program. Seagate still recommended I send it back. Here is a link to the noise (just hit the play button): http://www64.zippyshare.com/v/14067017/file.html
The weird thing is it's hard to get it to directly make this noise on purpose. Yesterday I kept browsing random files on that drive hoping to make the noise, but nothing. It wasn't until I went to my web browser that it made the noise, weird.

-Third drive was a 600 GB Western Digital Velociraptor (bought in March 2012, ordered online from The US). This drive is less than two months old, yet yesterday when I rebooted my computer it made some crazy noises and the bootup was weird, like very delayed. I ran diagnostic tests on it and it passed them, however when I run a 'quick test' it makes this crazy noise for exactly 24 seconds each time. Here is the audio (just hit the play button): http://www64.zippyshare.com/v/21284152/file.html
Right now the drive is quiet as hell, only seemed to happen the time I rebooted and when I ran the quick test. Western Digital is lazy and won't give me any type of support except for replacing the drive itself.

My computer parts and specs:
-Intel Core i7-2600K Processor with 8 MB Cache, 3.40 GHz for Socket LGA1155 - Unlocked Boxed
-16 GBs of RAM
-Graphics card: EVGA GeForce GTX470 Superclocked 1280 MB DDR5 PCI-Express 2.0 Graphics Card 012-P3-1472-AR
-Motherboard: Asus Sabertooth P67 (New p67 B3 revision)
-Power supply: CORSAIR Professional Series HX750 (CMPSU-750HX) 750W ATX12V 2.3 / EPS12V 2.91 SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS SILVER Certified Modular Active PFC Power Supply
-CoolIT SYSTEMS ECO-R120 Advanced Liquid Cooling (ALC)

What could be the possible problem? Power supply? Motherboard? Something else?

Any help would be appreciated.

Thank you
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10-May-2012, 11:01 AM #2
Voltage???
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10-May-2012, 11:43 AM #3
Hi Dave,

Not sure what you exactly mean. Voltage in the bios?

Or is his what you need to know?
"Electricity in South Korea is 220 Volts, alternating at 60 cycles per second. If you travel to Korea, South with a device that does not accept 220 Volts at 60 Hertz, you will need a voltage converter."
From: http://treehouse.ofb.net/go/en/volta...a%252C%2BSouth
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10-May-2012, 12:15 PM #4
I was suggesting that the power supply may be different.
It is not only the Voltage and frequency that is important, the variation/stability does affect things even more so.

My brother, and my sister both live in towns about 25 miles from me, and both kill power supplies like nobodies business. I have other "customers" in the same towns and they are the same.
People using the same parts in other places have no problems at all.

Last edited by DaveBurnett; 10-May-2012 at 12:27 PM..
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10-May-2012, 12:18 PM #5
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveBurnett View Post
I was suggesting that the power supply may be different.
It is not only the Voltage and frequency that is important, the variation/stability does affect things even more so.
What do you recommend?
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10-May-2012, 12:57 PM #6
Well you can get power smoothers, but they're not the sort of thing you want to carry around (not the ones I've seen).

??Have a look on Google and see if you can get Mains Power Smoother - or something like that
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13-May-2012, 11:19 PM #7
Kinda confused why I'd need a power smoother. I thought that was the PSU's job?

Could it be a voltage issue in the bios as well?
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14-May-2012, 05:13 AM #8
It is, but modern ones are diode based rather than decently heavy coils, so they break easily. Also they can only cope with minor fluctuations.
I didn't say anything about the BIOS??
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14-May-2012, 05:23 AM #9
Some public power supplies are also prone to more frequent power surges. They can add up. A good protector with a low ceiling may help, too. I lost so much equipment in my home due to storms that I finally installed a whole-house surge suppressor. It was only $60 (a good strip can cost $30) and I haven't had any problems since.

Besides, the way the Sun has been acting, we should all be ready.
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