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What does "Dual Channel Supported" mean?


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30-Jan-2007, 10:22 PM #1
Question What does "Dual Channel Supported" mean?
Hey every one,

I'm interested in this mother board: Click here.

But what does "Dual Channel Supported" mean under memory?

Is it can of like how you can connect two video cards together, but for memory?

Also whats the best way to find out if a mother board on the internet will with another item? Like a hard drive or ram .etc.

Thank you for your time,

Bigk
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30-Jan-2007, 10:27 PM #2
Dual channel memory means that you need a matched set of DDR2 memory sticks to run it. Just search Dual channel memory.
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30-Jan-2007, 10:41 PM #3
That's one hell of a board. Dual channel in terms of motherboards means the bandwidth is 'theoretically' doubled. However this should not be a selling point. All modern processors and motherboards support dual channel memory. In terms of RAM. RAM that is advertised as 'dual channel' means they have been tested to work together and come from the same 'batch' of memory when it is manufactured. Again.... Should not be a selling point. Virtually all RAM that comes in a pack of 2 will run in dual channel provided the RAM itself is compatible with them motherboard. Yes. Contrary to what many believe you still need to make sure your ram is compatible with the motherboard EVEN with AMD processors where the memory controller is on the CPU itself.

You must be getting ready to overclock. If you plan on running your system at stock speeds then that motherboard is not the right choice. If your interested in clocking the hell out of your processor and RAM then you made a good choice.
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31-Jan-2007, 12:01 AM #4
I'm not interested in over clocking it. I really don't want to viod my warranty if I manage to get this. Also I don't want to fry any thing either.

Bigk
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31-Jan-2007, 12:21 AM #5
As long as you don't use the nforce software to overclock and you set the board to "Optimal" settings in the BIOS you will love it. Remember DO NOT use nforce to try to tweak any system settings it is garbage. When you get interested in overclocking, and you will, do it in the BIOS only. I can't tell you how many posts I've seen in nvidia's forum saying, nforce fried my system. I don't care what anyone tells you it is terrible and don't use it. Other than that I would kill to have that board. OK, maybe not kill, maybe just maim a little.
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