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eMachines T3256 won't boot; beeps continuously


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mig62 mig62 is offline
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26-Jul-2009, 08:10 PM #1
Red face eMachines T3256 won't boot; beeps continuously
Starting a few days ago, when I press the ON button to start my eMachines T3256, nothing appears on the monitor. The computer starts a beeping sound as follows: high-pitched "beep" of 1-2 second duration at 3-4 second intervals.

Searching online (on another computer) for a solution indicated that such a Beep code might mean the system was overheating. So I took the cover off the computer, cleaned out some dust, and started it up again. The 3 fans I could see were all working, but the same "beeping" noise started and still nothing on the monitor (the monitor power light is on).

I'm not sure what to do next and would appreciate any help with this.
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26-Jul-2009, 08:22 PM #2
Take the tower into a shop and have them test the power supply and if the power supply is bad, have them hook a known good power supply to the motherboard and test the board.

If this machine has a Bestec power supply, Bestecs are notorious for blowing and taking out the motherboard and possibly other components.

If you have a power supply tester and a known good power supply to jump to the motherboard then of course you can do the tests yourself.

I get machines in all the time to do these tests, they should take about 30 minutes and the cost should be minimal maybe $25-$30 or so.
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26-Jul-2009, 08:28 PM #3
I have one, its doing the same thing, mucho bad. It means it can't even really get started at all so I think some major component has failed. Try unplugging everything from the motherboard (drives, USB, add in cards) and see if it makes any difference. I'll start tearing mine down and get back if I figure anything out. I think it major and not overheating, unless some part is burnt out and overheats instantly, in which case overheating is just a symptom.
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27-Jul-2009, 10:22 AM #4
Red face If "power supply" bad, will internal fans still run?
Thank you to the responders to my initial question. I will probably take the tower into a shop, as suggested, to test the power supply, etc. because I don't have the means to do this myself. Also, I am not comfortable with taking components off the motherboard and testing in that way.

Just want to make sure before I take it to the shop.... the fans that are operating in my computer use a different "power supply" than that referred to for the motherboard?
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27-Jul-2009, 11:22 AM #5
The fans are connected to the power supply either through the motherboard or by a direct connection. The fact that the fans run only tell you there is some current on the +12v rail. You still have the +3.3v, the +5v and the -12v rails to test.

The power good/power OK signal that controls the starting of the motherboard operates off the +5v rail.
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02-Aug-2009, 06:27 PM #6
Diagnosis and result? Apparently mine is the Thermaltake PSU. No beeps with new one so far anyway though I haven't put it all together again yet.

Can a case cause problems with a PSU? This is at least the 3rd one to blow in this one so far.
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03-Aug-2009, 01:33 AM #7
Quote:
Originally Posted by fairnooks View Post
Can a case cause problems with a PSU? This is at least the 3rd one to blow in this one so far.
In my opinion the answer is yes.

Many power supply manufacturers or resellers calculate the output voltage of the power supply at 25C. Installed power supply's will normally operate at 40-50C. If you have a chassis with poor thermal design and the power supply is getting too hot continuously it can significantly decrease the life of the power supply internal components.
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03-Aug-2009, 01:56 AM #8
Had that problem first. I think you should try to see if your Ram and other peripheral components is not loose. Also blwoing the dust on the board surface might help you solve it totally.
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