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Can Not Access BIOS/CPU Over Heating


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JonnyFB421's Avatar
JonnyFB421 JonnyFB421 is offline
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04-Apr-2010, 10:40 PM #1
Can Not Access BIOS/CPU Over Heating
Setup:
Motherboard: MSI 975x Platinum Powerup Edition (MS-7246)
BIOS: Phoenix - AwardBIOS V6.00PG
CPU: Intel Q6600 ~2.4GHz (Not overclocked obviously)
RAM: 4GB DDR2
Video Card: Nvidia 9400 GT
PSU: LOGISYS Computer PS575XBK (575W)
OS: Windows 7 64x (7600)
Case: Xion II Black Pearl

Problem:
This has been happening for months, despite many failed fix attempts. So my computer has been over heating, I installed HW Monitor and EVEREST to see what the problem may be, and upon further investigation I can see the temperature of the CPU is DANGEROUSLY high. When the system idles it is about 60-69 C, upon anything installing, or even having WMP open it shoots up to 70-90C within 60 seconds. I decided I would enter the BIOS and attempt to play with various settings trying to fix it. Upon this step I realized, if I pressed any keystroke on start up my computer shuts off. I used to be able to access them of course. So I tried to flash them by using a bootable flash drive, but apparently BIOS (like skynet) is self aware and prepared for this, the boot priority seems to be changed to hard drive before everything else. Of course I can not change this, because my computer will restart. I decided to try to remount the heat-sink/fan over the CPU, and scored away the old thermal paste and applied new paste. This however, did not help as the temperatures remain the same.

So guys and girls! What should we do?
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05-Apr-2010, 08:27 AM #2
First of all, did you pull the mb out of the case to do the hsf and thermal compound? If not, you are asking for problems. The socket 775 type hsf can be a pain to install for an inexperienced builder. Once you have done a few, then it is no big deal however the first one or two can be a real challenge.

First of all, pull your mb out of the case. Now clean all parts with 99% or 91% alcohol. Do not use the 70% stuff they sell in the supermarket. It contains lanolin and will leave a residue. Once all parts are completely clean and dry, apply new thermal compound IAW [in accordance with] the thermal compound maker's instructions. Now install your hsf correctly as follows;
1 Push firmly on diagonally opposed push pins until you hear them click
2 Push firmly on the other two until you hear them click
3 Turn the board over and inspect the four push pins to make sure they are fully engaged. If not, reseat them
4 Once you are sure all four pins are correctly installed, reinstall the board into the case.

Note with the socket 775 type hsf, it must contact the cpu with a min of 15lb clamping force. Less than this and it will overheat and shutdown.
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05-Apr-2010, 07:18 PM #3
Thank you for the speedy reply,

Initially when I put the fan/heat sink in, (My old fan over my CPU stopped working so I replaced it) I had taken the MB out of the case. I however did not clean all the parts with alcohol. I only used the alcohol when I removed the old thermal paste. I will clean the rest of the mb tonight, (I mean it can't hurt) but that still leaves the problem of the BIOS. These issues can very possibly be unrelated, but they both started happening around the same time which raises a cause for suspicion. I'll verify that the heat-sink is set over the CPU correctly tonight, and probably clean the rest of the MB. If anything changes I'll surely post, if not any input is very well appreciated!
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05-Apr-2010, 08:23 PM #4
I think there is a mis-understanding. All parts refers to the cpu heat spreader and the bottom of the hsf. Those must be clean and dry. Do not clean the rest of the mb with alcohol. You can use a can of air to blow off the dust however do not use any liquid cleaner.
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05-Apr-2010, 09:24 PM #5
Sorry I've just had a long day at work been making silly mistakes like that all day. I am well aware that any liquid and motherboards = risky business, I don't even like to used compressed air because if held at an angle, liquid can come out... Though that's more of paranoia, we all have our things I guess. What I meant was I only have used alcohol on a cue tip to score off the old thermal paste, but have never applied it anywhere else. The HSF is in all the way, and I cleaned up any dust buildup on it, shiny clean now. Still runs at very high temperatures when I do anything, idled at 60 opened wmp and it jumped to 83....
I am thinking buying a new HSF is a great step, if you recall I mentioned the one I got with the mobo had gone out once before. The one I have was actually supposed to be a temporary solution, but since the temperature was pretty cool with it to begin with I have kept it. You seem to know much about the 775 socket is there any extremely well renowned HSF, or any you highly recommend? I would eventually like to overclock, but that's no deal breaker or anything.

I was thinking about getting something like this:
http://www.newegg.com/product/produc...82e16835186134
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06-Apr-2010, 07:34 AM #6
Arctic cooling is fine. I use an arctic freezer pro on my own system [amd 940 overclocked to 3.4] and it runs fine. Never gets above 55C even when under a 100% load running prime95.
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06-Apr-2010, 02:45 PM #7
At times defective capacitors can mimick other problems including overheating and cause machines to shut down.

Carefully check the capacitors on the motherboard and make sure none are becoming "domed" often referred to as "swollen" or "bulging". The capacitors should be perfectly flat on top. If you have any with a "domed" top or that are leaking a fluid, the capacitor is defective.

Attached is a link showing what you should be looking for.

http://www.badcaps.net/ident/

Bad capacitors may not be near as bad as some of the ones pictured and still be bad. Also, you may notice a slight "metallic" or "amonia like" smell in the case. In some instances you also may notice a "white" residue on other components in the vicinity of the capacitors. This "residue" is cause by capacitor "gassing".
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Tags
bios, cpu, overheating, q6600

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