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Ubuntu not recognising windows ntfs partition


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05-Oct-2011, 05:18 AM #1
Ubuntu not recognising windows ntfs partition
Hi,

So basically here goes. After much debate I decided to try a dual boot on my laptop running windows 7 ultimate with Ubuntu to see what it was like. I really like Ubuntu and considering that I only use my laptop for Internet browsing I have decided to install it all the way.

The problem goes like this. I cannot see or mount my NTFS partition from windows 7. This wouldn't be a problem as there is nothing on it of value however when I downloaded the Gnome partition manager, it could not format it always coming up with an error that said the device was busy.

I am new to Linux and don't really know what I'm doing so please bear with me.

James
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05-Oct-2011, 07:00 AM #2
How is your hard drive setup and partitioned right now?
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05-Oct-2011, 08:16 AM #3
Hi gatewaypc700,

In Ubuntu, run the following command:
$ sudo fdisk -l (i.e. lower case L)
and post the output in this thread.

-- Tom
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05-Oct-2011, 08:56 AM #4
I think the above questions and request for info are more important, but also related ...

The last time you booted to Windows did you shut down or did you Sleep or Hibernate? If Windows is currently sleeping or hibernating that may explain the 'busy' message.
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06-Oct-2011, 02:27 AM #5
Definitely shut down properly. I wasn't even aware that a computer could dual boot in sleep or hibernate! haha.

Prunejuice, its just two partitions. I installed ubuntu in windows right off the disk and chose the dual boot option. In a partition manager it appears as the linux partition (10gb) and the windows partition (65gb.)

Tom, let me just jump on my laptop and post the output.
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06-Oct-2011, 02:28 AM #6
Output: james@ubuntu:~$ sudo fdisk -l
[sudo] password for james:

Disk /dev/sda: 80.0 GB, 80026361856 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 9729 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0xd870d870

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sda1 * 1 9728 78140128+ 7 HPFS/NTFS
james@ubuntu:~$
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06-Oct-2011, 06:26 AM #7
Quote:
Originally Posted by gatewaypc700 View Post
I installed ubuntu in windows right off the disk and chose the dual boot option.
Wait...Is this a WUBI install?
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06-Oct-2011, 07:49 AM #8
Hi gatewaypc700,

Ok, so Ubuntu can see the NTFS drive partition.

Here is how you mount it from Ubuntu, and a few other commands - Note: comments are enclosed in () and not part of the command:

$ sudo mkdir /mnt/sda1
$ sudo mount -v -t ntfs /dev/sda1 /mnt/sda1
$ sudo -i (get into the root account)
# pushd /mnt/sda1/ (to visit the mount point directory)
# pwd (to determine the directory you are located)
# popd (to get back to /root directory)
# umount /dev/sda1 (to unmount the ntfs drive)
# exit ( to get back to your user account)
$

Note: It is best to navigate a mounted directory via pushd/popd and use the command dirs -l to see the current directory stack, rather than use the cd command to navigate directories - otherwise, when you go to umount, there may be some directories left on the stack and you won't be able to umount.

-- Tom
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06-Oct-2011, 11:01 AM #9
Quote:
I installed ubuntu in windows ...
If it's a Wubi install I'm pretty sure it will only detect the pseudo-partition into which it is installed, as shown by your fdisk -l. My question/comment assumed a "true" dual boot (different and independent partitions).
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08-Oct-2011, 07:17 PM #10
True. Yeah its a wubi install. Im guessing this was the stupid way to go about it?

And thanks Tom, will try this as soon as I can get a spare minute and let you know how it goes!
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08-Oct-2011, 07:28 PM #11
Probably among the smartest ways to go about it if all you want to do is install without partitioning. But if accessing the NTFS was the goal, then maybe not.

People who don't use WUBI on new machines with recovery partitions often lose access to them by making changes to the real partitions. For them, WUBI is the best choice.
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08-Oct-2011, 08:08 PM #12
You know, if this is the laptop in your Computer Specifications list, running Ubuntu as a virtual machine using VirtualBox or something similar is always an option...
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09-Oct-2011, 03:12 AM #13
If Ubuntu is installed as a guest system, which is just a large file, inside a Windows host would it be logical that it can mount the entire host filing system and see itself inside it again?

If a Linux were installed as a separate operating system, which Post #6 confirmed it was not, and has its own partition then any Linux can mount, read and write a NTFS partition because this is an integral part of a modern Linux kernel.
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