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Burning avi to watch on DVD player


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paul_carron's Avatar
paul_carron paul_carron is offline
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13-Oct-2007, 12:20 PM #1
Burning avi to watch on DVD player
Hey,

If I want to burn avi films to watch on my DVD player is it just a matter of buning them straight to a CD/DVD and playing them on a compatible player or is there anythng else involved? If its just a matter of burning them as normal are there any issues over putting more than one file on the same disk?

Cheers
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13-Oct-2007, 01:44 PM #2
Most dvd players will not play avi files. The avi files will need to be converted to dvd compatable mpeg2, then authored to the proper dvd file structure.You can find alot of information on dvd authoring at videohelp.com
videohelp
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13-Oct-2007, 03:38 PM #3
Rick is correct but if you ever want to go the divx encoded avi way, its soooooooo much quicker and easier and I think the results are substantially better as well than messing with the rigid DVD structure all the time.

All you need is an inexpensive Divix/DVD combo player, then all I do is burn 720x480 (or PAL or even 640x480 or I can just burn downloaded divx podcast videos and watch them as well....see, much more flexible already) divix data files to DVD and I'm DONE! Like I said, its a wonderful time saver and the results are better (keeping the bitrate at or above about 4000 of course) than DVD standards unless you encode a DVD at maximum quality which is only one hour on a single layer DVD.

I pass the word whenever I get the opportunity. If you make a lot of DVDs for friends and others its not a good choice though because they either have to play it on a computer or have a Divix certified DVD player.
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16-Oct-2007, 06:35 AM #4
Quote:
Originally Posted by paul_carron
Hey,

If I want to burn avi films to watch on my DVD player is it just a matter of buning them straight to a CD/DVD and playing them on a compatible player or is there anythng else involved? If its just a matter of burning them as normal are there any issues over putting more than one file on the same disk?
As long as you have a compatible player (DivX) and your AVI's are also DivX (and sometimes XviD) you would simply burn them as DATA. There can be problems though as not all AVI's are encoded the same.

Quote:
All you need is an inexpensive Divix/DVD combo player, then all I do is burn 720x480 (or PAL or even 640x480
That statement makes no sense.

Quote:
Like I said, its a wonderful time saver and the results are better (keeping the bitrate at or above about 4000 of course)
That statement also makes no sense as most DivX/XviD's bitrates hover around 1000 kb/s.

Converting to DVD can be done for free and provides a much more flexible experience... menus, chapters and near universal playability.
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16-Oct-2007, 12:01 PM #5
MysticEyes, go to divx.com and learn, you are waaaayyy behind the times. I'll give you universal playability (if you'll note I said that solution wasn't for everyone) but we're up to 10-12,000 kb/s bitrates, full screen 1920x1080 NEAR-high definition playback and all the way back down to maybe 550 kb/s bitrate for a half-passable 640x480 web video. Divx DVDs to my knowledge are still limited to same upper dimension as DVDs on stand alone DVD/Divx players...yet--obviously the higher bitrates >4000 kb/s, and greater dimensions are reserved for playback over a media network.

DIVX is so much more flexible than DVD its not even funny...variable compatible resolutions, speed, setup, picture quality if desired, chapters and menus again if desired, "conversion"...it goes on and on as to the reasons why......

--but you do have me on universal playability (as long as we forget about region locking eh?); in fact that's why DVD standards are so RIGID with no room to flex at all so they will be COMPATIBLE, not flexible.

Last edited by fairnooks; 16-Oct-2007 at 12:09 PM..
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17-Oct-2007, 05:31 AM #6
Hey nooks, did you bother to read the topic, Burning avi to watch on DVD player? Not converting to Divx.

I guess I am behind the times as this statement also makes no sense to me:
Quote:
its soooooooo much quicker and easier and I think the results are substantially better as well than messing with the rigid DVD structure all the time.
Quicker than what? Substantially better than what? The original DVD? And what exactly does DIVX is so much more flexible than DVD mean. There's nothing flexible about a proprietary format like Divx.

When most folks ask about AVIs they are usually referring to Xvids. Your Dvix is strictly a niche product that is all but ignored in the Scene. Just as the Scene moved from Divx to Xvid the next step is H264/AVC, with x264 (open source) the encoder of choice. That's where compression is going not Divx. There are tons of HD/extended resolution movie rips and music videos floating around, 99% of them are x264/H264.
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17-Oct-2007, 07:43 AM #7
Yes but there aren't any analogs to a stand alone Divx DVD player are there? You're floating off topic. I've always been talking mainly about the flexibility of divx encoded files played on a stand alone player vs. the inflexibility of DVD creation, except for widespread compatibility due to the small footprint of divx players.

The whole process from encoding of home videos to viewing from a divx dvd is where the faster, better, longer part steps in. If mpeg-2 DVD production were better I'd of course be on that hard and heavy instead, and as you know that codec is pretty darn restrictive, and there is a perponderance of DVD making/burning questions/problems and without really good production software its difficult for many home users to create a DVD that follows the strict guidelines of that industry standard. Industry, not consumer.

We can debate the fine points of non-dvd conversion formats sometime when that is the point of discussion if you like.
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17-Oct-2007, 09:24 AM #8
Paul_Carron, there is a program called ConvertXtoDVD which will essentially convert your video files (.avi etc) and burn it onto a DVD. I believe there is a trial on their website.

There are a few dvd players that has can play avis and mpgs straight off, but again, only a few.
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Jon1001 Jon1001 is offline
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17-Oct-2007, 11:15 AM #9
DVD Flick is a free program which converts avi and burns the videos to a dvd if you don't want to buy a divx DVD player. It's very good.
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