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Cannot Ping Computer on a Wireless Network from Wired Network


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Dave4237's Avatar
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31-Jan-2012, 12:36 AM #1
Cannot Ping Computer on a Wireless Network from Wired Network
My computer is a 32 bit, Win7 SP1 with Pentium Dual Core 2.6 Ghz and 2Gb of Ram on a wired network. My wife has a similar system using a wireless network. She can ping my IP Address, but I cannot ping hers.

We both have full access to the Internet. We are using the same workgroup, and both computers have file and printer sharing enabled and IPv6 addresses and DNS server addresses selected automatically.

The problem appears to be with my computer, but I don't know how to solve it. Please help.

Here are my system stats:

Tech Support Guy System Info Utility version 1.0.0.2
OS Version: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium, Service Pack 1, 32 bit
Processor: Pentium(R) Dual-Core CPU E5300 @ 2.60GHz, x64 Family 6 Model 23 Stepping 10
Processor Count: 2
RAM: 2013 Mb
Graphics Card: Intel(R) G41 Express Chipset, 782 Mb
Hard Drives: C: Total - 76308 MB, Free - 49226 MB; D: Total - 286167 MB, Free - 52893 MB; M: Total - 38154 MB, Free - 7 MB;
Motherboard: ASUSTeK Computer INC., P5G41-M LE
Antivirus: Microsoft Security Essentials, Updated and Enabled
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31-Jan-2012, 01:35 AM #2
She may have a firewall enabled that is blocking you. Check for any 3rd party software on her computer.

Also what IP addresses do both of you have?
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06-Feb-2012, 01:59 PM #3
My IP address is 192.168.5.103. My wife's IP address is 192.168.0.102. She is using a Belkin USB Wireless Adapter, Model #F7D2101 v1. I could not find any firewall on the adaptor. Is there one on the D-Link WAP Model DIR-615, maybe?
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06-Feb-2012, 03:53 PM #4
You're on different networks. Since she can ping you I would guess that you are using daisy-chained routers and she is connected to the second one.
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07-Feb-2012, 05:04 AM #5
With the wireless router connected to the wired router, how can fix the situation?
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07-Feb-2012, 08:54 AM #6
What are the make/models od the two routers?
Check the instructions for the wireless router and see if it can be set as a WAP on the same network as the wired router. Some newer ones let you do this by making a few selections on their setup pages.

Otherwise, this should work.


Connecting two soho routers in a network
Tutorial from Johnwill from the Networking Forum

Note: The "primary" router can be an actual router, a software gateway like Microsoft Internet Connection Sharing, or a server connection that has the capability to supply more than one IP address using DHCP server capability. No changes are made to the primary "router" configuration.

Configure the IP address of the secondary router(s) to be in the same subnet as the primary router, but out of the range of the DHCP server in the primary router. For instance DHCP server addresses 192.168.0.2 through 192.168.0.100, I'd assign the secondary router 192.168.0.254 as it's IP address, 192.168.0.253 for another router, etc.

Note: Do this first, as you will have to reboot the computer to connect to the router again for the remaining changes.

Disable the DHCP server in the secondary router.

Setup the wireless section just the way you would if it was the primary router, channels, encryption, etc.

Connect from the primary router's LAN port to one of the LAN ports on the secondary router. If there is no uplink port and neither of the routers have auto-sensing ports, use a cross-over cable. Leave the WAN port unconnected!

This procedure bypasses the routing function (NAT layer) and configures the router as a switch (or wireless access point for wireless routers).

Hopefully one of these will lead you in the right direction.

Primary router would be the wired router, secondary would be the wireless.
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