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Home LAN with Vonage Problem


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geonova's Avatar
geonova geonova is offline
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01-Jul-2012, 12:47 PM #1
Home LAN with Vonage Problem
I hope this is the right place for this.....

I'm having a difficult time finding a solution to get my home LAN running with a Vonage box connected. The following describes my setup:

Cable modem >
Linksys wrt54g >
1. Vonage vdv22-vd > PC1
2. PC2

Without the Vonage box all is fine. With Vonage box connected none of the PC's can see each other.

PC1 IP address reads 192.168.15.1 with Vonage box. Before adding the Vonage box IP address was 192.168.1.1.

I'm hoping for a solution without having to reconfigure hardware as cable modem and router are remotely located. I get a NAT issue error when troubleshooting through win7 on PC1.

Is there any way I can set this up to work with the current hardware configuration? If so, would anyone be able to kindly offer a solution? It would be much appreciated as I am at my wits end.

Thanks!,
Geo.
TerryNet's Avatar
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01-Jul-2012, 04:37 PM #2
You want all the computers to be on the same LAN. It looks to me that you have them on separate ones (if PC2 is connected to the Linksys instead of the Vonage).
geonova's Avatar
geonova geonova is offline
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01-Jul-2012, 05:33 PM #3
Thanks for responding,

Not sure I understand. Each device is connected to the Linksys and without the Vonage box everything worked fine. The only difference is that the Vonage box is now between the router and PC1 connection so is interrupting my LAN, according to Vonage this shouldn't happen and everything should work when I plug it in. Anyway, I've lost faith in their tech support after being bumped and hung up on several times. I was hoping there was some way to set these up with all the many options between the two routers to make my network on PC1 visible again.

Geo.
TerryNet's Avatar
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01-Jul-2012, 05:46 PM #4
You need to connect all computers to the same LAN--to the same router or else use one of the routers as only an ethernet switch and, optionally, a wireless access point.

It might be better to use the Vonage as the (primary) router. Either way, if you decide on the second option ...

JohnWill's procedure (Aug. 30, 2008) for configuring a secondary router as a switch and, optionally, wireless access point follows.

Connecting two (or more) SOHO broadband routers together.

Note: The "primary" router can be an actual router, a software gateway like Microsoft Internet Connection Sharing, or a server connection that has the capability to supply more than one IP address using DHCP server capability. No changes are made to the primary "router" configuration.

Configure the IP address of the secondary router(s) to be in the same subnet as the primary router, but out of the range of the DHCP server in the primary router. For instance DHCP server addresses 192.168.0.2 through 192.168.0.100, I'd assign the secondary router 192.168.0.254 as it's IP address, 192.168.0.253 for another router, etc.

Note: Do this first, as you will have to reboot the computer to connect to the router again for the remaining changes.

Disable the DHCP server in the secondary router.

Setup the wireless section just the way you would if it was the primary router, channels, encryption, etc.

Connect from the primary router's LAN port to one of the LAN ports on the secondary router. If there is no uplink port and neither of the routers have auto-sensing ports, use a cross-over cable. [You will not need a cross-over cable if one of the "routers" is a computer.] Leave the WAN port unconnected!

This procedure bypasses the routing function (NAT layer) and configures the router as a switch (or wireless access point for wireless routers).

For reference, here's a link to a Typical example config using a Netgear router
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