Advertisement

There's no such thing as a stupid question, but they're the easiest to answer.
Login
Search

Advertisement

Networking Networking
Search Search
Search for:
Tech Support Guy > > >

Help setting up wireless RoadRunner


(!)

Crickets23's Avatar
Crickets23 Crickets23 is offline
Junior Member with 24 posts.
THREAD STARTER
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Experience: Beginner
10-Feb-2005, 02:49 AM #1
Help setting up wireless RoadRunner
Trying to do some research before going out to get a wireless router and ethernet cards, etc. so I can set up wireless Roadrunner. I really need simple specifics on everything, as I'm getting very confused after reading so many posts on this and other boards!
Here's what I have - presently have dial-up AOL hooked up to a Dell Dimension 2400 desktop with Windows XP Home/SP1. Also have an old Gateway with Windows 98SE (that you guys helped me get back up and working) in the basement that I haven't hooked up to AOL yet, as I was hoping I could just hook it up to Roadrunner when I got everything else set up. The cable people just set up a cable modem in the garage the other day as the PC isn't near a cable outlet, and told me to get a wireless router and ethernet adapter and left it at that.
From what I've read, I now need a wireless router hooked up to the modem in the garage (any suggestions on a brand of router would be nice - seems the Linksys and Netgear are popular), and then I need to open up the PC and put an ethernet adapter in. Do I need any specific adapter for the Dell 2400 or will any one do, and does it need to be compatible with the router, or is everything pretty compatible?
That should be the the easy part, as it looks like lots of people have problems configuring things and getting the PC to recognize the internet over the wireless - I'm hoping that won't be a problem, but any advice you can give me ahead of time as far as downloading drivers, or disabling anything else with AOL or in the PC would be greatly appreciated.
Also, do I need a separate firewall, or is that usually in the router already, and does it matter that the PC is about 30 - 40 feet from the modem in the garage? And last, will the old dinosaur Gateway in the basement be able to be connected by the router as well and can I use the same ethernet adapter in both PC's?
I know that's a lot of stuff, but any step-by-step help is greatly appreciated, or any links also.
Thanks!
StumpedTechy's Avatar
Computer Specs
Member with 7,213 posts.
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Central Florida
Experience: Advanced
10-Feb-2005, 08:35 AM #2
Just a few thoughts -

The main thing with wireless is going to be distance - You need to first determine appx distance from the wireless router for each computer. Also note how many walls, or floors may be in the way. On top of that not any strong electrical interferance can effect the bubble as well. I.E. if you have a router that has a max range of 100 feet and your 75 feet away but therei s a home elctronics equipment in the way and powered up you may not get a signal. Also I hear wireless signal is much stronger left and right of the unti rather than above the unit.

As far as hardware types I usually tell people to stick with 1 brand through the whole thing then you have 1 vendor you can fall back on for any problems you have (just an opinion). As far as which is better? I don't think there is a clear line most people have pros and cons to each.

Also note that they do sell USB Wireless adapters so if your NOT wanting to crack open cases and install new hardware if you have a powered USB port you can probably get away using that. The main thing to ensure is you have USB 2.0 and not 1.1.

As far as working with AOL I do not know what their specs are. Last I had heard you have to setup something in the router to get logged on to AOL but I don't know if this is now changed. My dad had indicated he was able to browse with I.E. without even logging on to AOL so that makes me think you may not have to specifically designate anything in the router.
Crickets23's Avatar
Crickets23 Crickets23 is offline
Junior Member with 24 posts.
THREAD STARTER
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Experience: Beginner
10-Feb-2005, 05:09 PM #3
Thanks for the reply Stump - I went ahead and picked up a Linksys wireless-G 802.11g router today (WRT54G) and a Linksys Wireless-G PCI adapter, so we'll see how it goes. And just to clarify, I won't be working wth AOL - I plan on getting rid of that as soon as the RoadRunner is up and working.
StumpedTechy's Avatar
Computer Specs
Member with 7,213 posts.
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Central Florida
Experience: Advanced
10-Feb-2005, 09:17 PM #4
IMHO thats great! I have never liked the big name ISP's and always take the most basic route. All that bloatware of added software and alot of features that can break and usually aren't overly utilized turn me off.

What I would recommend with wireless is to first work on the straight connection and then work on any security measures you may want to implement. I usually tell people to make 1 security change at a time so that way your not making too many changes and cause problems.
rdkapp's Avatar
rdkapp rdkapp is offline
Member with 196 posts.
 
Join Date: Jan 1999
Location: Houston, Texas
Experience: Intermediate
11-Feb-2005, 04:41 AM #5
(1) Nothing against Linksys. I know it's a very good brand and one of the most popular, if not the most popular, but I've had really good luck with D-Link routers.
(2) Your dinosaur Gateway, if it is equipped with USB, it is most likely USB 1.1 and desktop wireless adapters which work with USB 1.1 are few and far between. I looked not too long ago and only found a US Robotics. I purchased it along with a US Robotics router for my parents house and it worked, but I definitely prefer D-Link.
(3) If you can't stay with the same brand (e.g. if Linksys doesn't have a desktop wireless adapter that works with USB 1.1), I would use well known brands (i.e. Linksys, D-Link, Netgear, SMC, US Robotics) when mixing.

Hope this helps and good luck.
Crickets23's Avatar
Crickets23 Crickets23 is offline
Junior Member with 24 posts.
THREAD STARTER
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Experience: Beginner
11-Feb-2005, 08:13 PM #6
Thanks for the advice Stump and RD. I'm off now to hook things up, so I'm sure I'll be back on shortly with the first problem I encounter!
Crickets23's Avatar
Crickets23 Crickets23 is offline
Junior Member with 24 posts.
THREAD STARTER
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Experience: Beginner
11-Feb-2005, 11:46 PM #7
Okay - first set of problems/stupid questions:
I've got the wireless PCI adapter installed using the disc that came with it - took only a few minutes, now I have no idea what to do next.
I then put the CD that came with the router into the PC and it told me to hook the router up to the modem and to the network port on the PC. First do I need to do this since the router is going to be in the garage where the Roadrunner cable and Telephony modem were placed by the cable guy.
I'm thinking that I might need to hook the router directly to the PC to get some settings configured or some such thing, and then move the router out to the garage. But when it tells me to hookk the router up, it says to use one the cable that came with the router to hook to the network port on the PC - that was okay. Then it says to hook the cable from the modem to the internet slot on the router. Now I'm not sure what cable this is as the only 2 cables on the back of my modem are one going to the wall jack and one that goes to a phone. I tried to hook the cable from the wall jack to the router just for fun, but I see the size of the plug (it's like a regular phone jack) is smaller than the ports on the router (those are the size of the network cable plug which is bigger than a regular phone jack). Now, I don't see any other cable or slot on the back of the computer that could plug into the router, so I have no idea what to do next.
I've also got the CD thta came with the Telephony modem so I'm going to try to put that in, but I don't see what it's going to do unless the router is hooked first - I'm hoping someone can point me in the right direction!
Thanks!
rdkapp's Avatar
rdkapp rdkapp is offline
Member with 196 posts.
 
Join Date: Jan 1999
Location: Houston, Texas
Experience: Intermediate
12-Feb-2005, 03:11 AM #8
Crickets,
First, let me say that a wired network is more secure, more reliable, and more stable than a wireless network. Re-read Stumped Techy's first post for some of the issues you may be dealing with in a wireless network. Don't get me wrong, wireless is great, but IMO, it should be limited in application to: (1) computers that are mobile (ones that can easily be moved from one location to another); and (2) stationary computers that due to their location, cannot have network cable run to them. Personally, I have 3 desktop computers in my home, networked to a "wireless" router by network cable (the ends look like telephone cable plugs, but larger) and I have a laptop computer with a built-in wireless adapter that I roam around the house with while using. It was a bit of a hassle to run some of the network cable, but IMO, well worth it.

Second, do not confuse your cable modem with your telephone modem. They are two separate modems and do not connect to each other. The telephone modem connects to the telephone line and is used for dial up internet access (AOL), receiving and sending faxes, and any other telephony software. Generally speaking, a cable modem is used for broadband internet access. To set up broadband or wireless broadband, you only need to concern yourself with the cable modem, which I understand from your post, is in the garage.

Now, with that said, I'm not sure why the Cable Modem installer was so quick to put the Cable Modem in the garage and to tell you to go wireless. Did he/she not give you the option of installing another cable outlet closer to the Dell computer? Does your Dell have a wired network adapter? It sounds like you don't, but if you do, is it possible to install an additional cable outlet closer to the Dell desktop PC? I would recommend that, even if you have to pay for installation of that extra cable outlet. If you can, I would call roadrunner back out to install an additional outlet in proximity to the Dell and then follow the instructions which are obviously for wired setup. In addition to having a wired connection from the Dell to the router, it is also important (IMO) to have the cable modem and router close to your computer, because occasionally you will need to view the LED lights on the modem and router. I would not want to have to walk out to the garage everytime I needed to view those lights.

Another option is to go wired with the old Dinosaur Gateway. If it has a network port on the back, then you would need to run a network cable from the Gateway to one of the Lan ports on the router. Of course, you would need to be able to run a network cable from your basement to the garage. If the Gateway does not have a network port on the back, it will be easier and cheaper to find a network adapter to install in that machine (provided you have an open PCI slot) than it will be to find a desktop network adapter that works with USB 1.1. Then you would just need to run the network cable. There are websites that describe how to setup wired networks and even how to make network cables, if you are so inclined. If you decide to go that route, just post and I, or someone else on this board will post some links.

If you cannot go wired, then you would need to use your AOL account (through dial up access) to setup the router. You must have internet access to setup your router to go wireless.

Generally, in a network with a wireless router and cable modem, the setup is as follows: (1) the cable from the wall will attach directly to the back of the cable modem; (2) a network cable is attached to the back of the cable modem with the other end going to the WAN (internet) port of the router. There are no other cables involved. The main difference between a wired network and a wireless network (non-technically speaking) in your setup, is that a wired setup will have a network cable going from the network adapter in your computer to one of the LAN ports on the router, while a wireless setup will not.

I know there's a ton of information above and I hope it helps. OTOH, if you have any specific questions about any of the above, just post back.
As Seen On

BBC, Reader's Digest, PC Magazine, Today Show, Money Magazine
WELCOME TO TECH SUPPORT GUY!

Are you looking for the solution to your computer problem? Join our site today to ask your question. This site is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations.

If you're not already familiar with forums, watch our Welcome Guide to get started.


(clock)
THIS THREAD HAS EXPIRED.
Are you having the same problem? We have volunteers ready to answer your question, but first you'll have to join for free. Need help getting started? Check out our Welcome Guide.

Search Tech Support Guy

Find the solution to your
computer problem!




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools


WELCOME
You Are Using: Server ID
Trusted Website Back to the Top ↑