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Can you use one wireless router to boost the signal of another?


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St!nkf!nger's Avatar
St!nkf!nger St!nkf!nger is offline
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10-Sep-2008, 10:46 PM #1
Can you use one wireless router to boost the signal of another?
With my two wireless routers, is it possible to use the one hooked up to the modem to beam the wireless signal to another wireless router that's plugged in elsewhere in the house? Then the second router would spread the signal to weak spots in the house. Can this be done?

If not, if I'm looking for better coverage in the house is it a better idea to have the router in the basement or on the second story?
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11-Sep-2008, 12:33 AM #2
Possibly, but it'd depend on the models of the routers. Some routers have the ability to act as a repeater - look for that under the options. The router that's acting as the repeater will be the router that the signal is being beamed to (ie, the second router that's plugged else where in the house)
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icmpechome icmpechome is offline
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11-Sep-2008, 03:26 AM #3
Also do a search for wifi booster/extender and high gain antenna. You should get back a lot of info.
For example: http://www.tigerdirect.com/applicati...|c:374|&Sort=4
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11-Sep-2008, 07:32 AM #4
You can wire almost any SOHO router as a WAP with the following configuration.

Connecting two (or more) SOHO broadband routers together.

Note: The "primary" router can be an actual router, a software gateway like Microsoft Internet Connection Sharing, or a server connection that has the capability to supply more than one IP address using DHCP server capability. No changes are made to the primary "router" configuration.

Configure the IP address of the secondary router(s) to be in the same subnet as the primary router, but out of the range of the DHCP server in the primary router. For instance DHCP server addresses 192.168.0.2 through 192.168.0.100, I'd assign the secondary router 192.168.0.254 as it's IP address, 192.168.0.253 for another router, etc.

Note: Do this first, as you will have to reboot the computer to connect to the router again for the remaining changes.

Disable the DHCP server in the secondary router.

Setup the wireless section just the way you would if it was the primary router, channels, encryption, etc.

Connect from the primary router's LAN port to one of the LAN ports on the secondary router. If there is no uplink port and neither of the routers have auto-sensing ports, use a cross-over cable. Leave the WAN port unconnected!

This procedure bypasses the routing function (NAT layer) and configures the router as a switch (or wireless access point for wireless routers).

For reference, here's a link to a Typical example config using a Netgear router




You can also increase the range of your primary router.

Hawking Tech has a number of products that will help you increase your wireless range. The root page is Hawking Hi-Gain™ WiFi Range Extending Products.

Some of the more interesting products are this Hawking [HSB2] Hi-Gain WiFi Signal Booster, which can be used on either end of a wireless connection to boost the signal power.

Another way to increase your signal strength is by the use of hi-gain antennas. You can choose from omni-directional or directional models, here are a some examples.

Hawking [HAI7SIP] Hi-Gain 7dBi Omni-Directional Antenna

Hawking [HAI15SC] Hi-Gain 15dBi Corner Antenna

[HAO14SD] Outdoor Hi-Gain 14dBi Directional Antenna Kit


This is just a sample of available products, many people have hi-gain antennas with similar specifications, but I haven't seen any other suppliers of signal boosters.
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St!nkf!nger's Avatar
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17-Sep-2008, 08:00 AM #5
@JohnWill

That sounds like what I'm trying to do, except I don't want to have to run cable between the two routers. I'd like to keep one router in the basement and place the other on the ground floor and connect them wirelessly. Is there a way you know of to do that?
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17-Sep-2008, 05:56 PM #6
You'll need a wireless bridge to connect between two boxes wirelessly. Some routers have such a capability, you need to look at your specific make/model and see if it offers that functionality.
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