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Determining the range of IP addresses on my network


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nevarDeath's Avatar
nevarDeath nevarDeath is offline
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06-Jan-2009, 10:28 AM #1
Determining the range of IP addresses on my network
Ok I have a network setup with a desktop connected to a wireless router with an ethernet cord. then I run 4 other computers off the WI-FI from it. I want to exclude all these computers IP addresses in my google analytics. I think I need to do 192.168.1.* (that IP is just an example, not my real IP)l traffic on our router, but I'm not sure and have not been able to find the answer on google. I think I just don't know what search terms to use to find the answer :/ One other strange thing I noticed is that my laptop and my girlfriend's laptop both had the same IP last night. I think they change though, when we connect. I know I have NOT set static IPs. The router is a Linksys WRT54GS
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06-Jan-2009, 02:28 PM #2
So what was your question?
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06-Jan-2009, 04:33 PM #3
Put 192.168.1.1 in the web browser. By default the username is left blank, and the password is admin. Under the setup page, do you see a page for DHCP? If so, then the DHCP page should list the IP range that the computer's have if none of the PCs are static.
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06-Jan-2009, 04:53 PM #4
If you have logging set in the router you should also be able to see when each DHCP lease was given and to what PC
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06-Jan-2009, 05:25 PM #5
Funny how dhcp is never mentioned in the OP's post.

Once again nevarDeath what was your question?

BTW if you exlude 192.168.1.* you exclude yourself since you just excluded the entire subnet.

You would just ignore those addresses in your google analytics report or put that url and 127.0.0.1 in the hosts file on those pcs and they will not be able to access that site. No access = no log.
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06-Jan-2009, 06:28 PM #6
I'm not trying to block my computers from accessing the site. I'm trying to make sure google analytics doesn't log our computers in its statistics and mess up my stats. My question was which block in the IP address do I need to exclude? Looks like Jason08 gave me the answer I needed as did wanderer2. I will check it when I get home and mark this as solved if that's how easy it'll be. Thanks for all the input guys!
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06-Jan-2009, 07:07 PM #7
I think you misunderstand. You "block" those ips at the router they don't get internet access at all.

You can get each workstations ip by doing a ipconfig at each station which lists its ip address.

You either have to accept the report as is including those pcs listed access or block them from the url so they are not included in the report.

Unless you can get Google to filter the report you have no other options.
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06-Jan-2009, 07:37 PM #8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wanderer2 View Post
I think you misunderstand. You "block" those ips at the router they don't get internet access at all.

You can get each workstations ip by doing a ipconfig at each station which lists its ip address.

You either have to accept the report as is including those pcs listed access or block them from the url so they are not included in the report.

Unless you can get Google to filter the report you have no other options.
Yeah I still didn't make myself clear. I'm not using the router to block anything. I'm just trying to find out what range of IP addresses we have on it so I know what to tell google to block from the stats. Google Analytics provides a filter feature to filter individual IPs or ranges of them. I apologize for not making myself more clear.



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06-Jan-2009, 08:05 PM #9
Quote:
Originally Posted by nevarDeath View Post
One other strange thing I noticed is that my laptop and my girlfriend's laptop both had the same IP last night.
That is a pretty clear indication that DHCP is not configured correctly. Unless you are referring to the external WAN IP address, which every device on your LAN would share. Unless you have paid for multiple external WAN IP addresses from your ISP, but that would be unusual. Anything in the 192.168.xxx.xxx range is on your internal LAN and set by your local DHCP (probably in your router). Every device on your local LAN should have a unique IP address in this 192.168.xxx.xxx range.

Last edited by AKAJohnDoe; 06-Jan-2009 at 08:13 PM..
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06-Jan-2009, 08:08 PM #10
Then you have the answers. Either get the info from your router or do a ipconfig on each pc which will list its ip.

But knowing your local ips doesn't mean anything to the google report.

There are millions of users with those same private ips.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Private_network

Google will only be able to log your routers wan ip not your lan ip. Ipchicken.com or whatsmyip.org will give you that info

Last edited by Wanderer2; 06-Jan-2009 at 08:24 PM..
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06-Jan-2009, 09:45 PM #11
Some routers actually do have an option to set a website filter separate from the MAC filter. I know some D-link routers do.
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