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Solved: Setting up Internal Network user


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bearly1227 bearly1227 is offline
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08-Apr-2009, 11:50 PM #1
Solved: Setting up Internal Network user
It is my desire to connect my Win XP PC to a network (Microcom) in such a way that the PC can see and share data with all the PC's on this network, but not pass anything through the Router gateway.

At the same time as this PC can connect via the network *using NETBUI", the other PC's can still connect a Linksys 5-Port Network Hub and through the Network Router Switch, using TCP/IP.

I still have wireless card attached to this PC, but disabled the Aegis Wireless Protocol (I am not sure if I needed to do that, since TCP/IP is already disabled.)

I think this should work, based on my very rusty network memories.

Thanks,

Bob
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09-Apr-2009, 09:25 AM #2
Note that NETBEUI is not available in any form on Vista or Windows 7, so you might want to take that into consideration in your planning. Personally, I'd be looking into better firewall solutions.

Please describe in detail what you're trying to accomplish, since by default someone coming in from the Internet can't access anything behind a router without you inviting them in in some way. You may be solving an issue that doesn't exist.
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09-Apr-2009, 03:29 PM #3
Updates to cloned computers . . .
The end result, if I am successful, is that I'll be able to use a file synchronization package to bring the "new" computer data up to date from the "old" computer, using the network link, instead of an updated version of "sneaker-net". (i.e. external HDD USB 2.0 interface).

It seems apparent to me that it will be easier to update one PC to the other via LAN instead of using the external HDD drive as the medium of exchange.

Why?

I am fully retired with one home in the north and a second in the south, and I divide my time more or less equally between the two locations. The past couple of years I've been shlepping the "summer" home computers to the "winter" home. This year, I got a couple of good used PC's and cloned my home PC's to these other PC's.

Now I need a mechanism whereby I will have one set of PC's in summer and the other pair in my winter home, and I need to update the data from one set to the other as I move back and forth, an would prefer to just carry the data that changed.

( Vista is not a consideration at this time, since neither of my "mission" critical programs will not run on it (so says Microsoft Vista test program). One is my wife's drawing package on her PC and the other is my boating navigation program on the other PC.

(Four PC's in total for this schema)


Bob
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09-Apr-2009, 09:19 PM #4
I'm a little confused. Are you trying to sync computers across a Local Area Network (within one home) or across the internet between homes?

John already answered the former--no issue.

For the latter you could use something like Ultra VNC to set up a secure virtual network. But that requires the computers at both homes to be on, which is probably not going to be the case.

You might want to look into some kind of online storage and/or syncing. Prices range from free to ridiculous. I'm using Sugar Sync, $30/year for 10 GB storage plus syncing, but their current pricing seems to start at $60/year for 30 GB. I better start saving more pennies!
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09-Apr-2009, 10:39 PM #5
Updating cloned computers . .
Sorry and Thank You,

Yes, my initial update is with both computers on the same Local LAN.

Regarding a prior answer, at this point only these two PC's will be exchanging information, with the one traveling northbound being synched to the one remaining behind (in the south).

Next fall, during Snowbird migration season, I plan to store the data which changed over the summer (DVD's most likely) and when I get to my southern home, update the southern computer with the newer data.

Then repeat this process at each migration cycle.

( I did consider a VPN, as I began to become mesmerized with the idea of installing a video camera system that would allow me to monitor the absented home. But, winter storms and rude network realities preclude anything approaching reliability.)

I think the safer approach would be to carry updated DVD's between the two locations.

I also considered bringing the hard drives, and using a HDD adapter to USB 2.0, set the disk with upgraded (HD1) data as the secondary drive, and either manually copy the data from HD1 to new primary drive (HD0) or use a program to identify the differences and decide which to update.

If someone can suggest a better approach, I am all ears! Mumble mumble better the dumb question that the doing the dumb thing ...

Again, Thank You,

Bob
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10-Apr-2009, 09:24 AM #6
OK. My confusion isn't necessarily your problem or fault.

As John said, a router will prevent an internet assault on your computers on your LAN.

I don't know anything about file sharing with TCP/IP disabled, but if you can get that enabled again here is a wizard way to enable file and printer sharing on computers that can communicate because they are connected to the same router or switch or hub or are directly connected by (cross over) ethernet cable or ad-hoc wireless.

Run the Network Setup wizard (found in Control Panel of XP). Tell it each of your computers connects to the internet via "residential gateway" and that you want to enable file and printer sharing. Create a disk at the end only if you have a Windows PC other than XP or 2k Pro or Vista.

Windows XP firewall (if SP2 or SP3) will be properly configured by the wizard. You must uninstall or properly configure any 3rd party firewalls on each machine. Unique computer names and same workgroup, of course.

The Shared Documents folder is automatically shared. Any other folders (or drives) or printers you want to share, just right click on them and sharing ... . When sharing a printer, accept the offer to load other drivers if your other PCs have different Operating System(s).

When you first go into My Network Places there will be nothing there. The first time you click on 'View Workgroup computers' will probably result in great disappointment. It takes awhile (up to 15 minutes) before all the computers in the workgroup get up-to-date and accurate lists of the other computers. Often you can speed up this process via Search for other computers.

When computers show up in My Network Places, double click on one to see its shares. If that includes a printer, you can right click on the printer to connect to it.

If you use any of these computers on a public network (not protected by your own router) just change the Windows XP firewall to "On, No Exceptions" and you will be protected as you were before enabling file and printer sharing.
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10-Apr-2009, 09:38 AM #7
My choice for transporting data between the two locations would be simply a USB external hard disk, it's quick, easy, fast, and reliable.
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10-Apr-2009, 09:50 AM #8
And you can wear one around your neck to look real techy!
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10-Apr-2009, 02:50 PM #9
Thanks John,

Problem is solved, at least the network part. The "problem", is that when I cloned the computer software to the "new" hardware, I forgot to change the name of the "new" PC.

I changed the name, and voila! Running only NetBUI on the "new" machine allows me to connect to my internal network, and remains hidden from the external network.

We are not quite there yet, but the problem of having the internal network recognized is resolved.

( I guess i do remember a few things from all those Microsoft courses after all.! <smirk>


Bob
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netbui, router, tcp/ip, winxp home

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