Advertisement

There's no such thing as a stupid question, but they're the easiest to answer.
Login
Search

Advertisement

Windows 7 Windows 7
Search Search
Search for:
Tech Support Guy > > >

Administrator Account does not have full privileges


(!)

Mulderator's Avatar
Member with 51,018 posts.
THREAD STARTER
 
Join Date: Feb 1999
16-Apr-2011, 05:23 PM #1
Administrator Account does not have full privileges
Ok--this is a new computer (laptop) with 7 Pro. The Administrator account has full privileges, but if I try to create a new account with administrator privileges, it does not have the full privileges--i.e., its a though its a more limited account even though it says its an administrator account. I have checked and there does not seem to be any fix for this except reinstalling windows--although this computer just came with OEM and I don't have a CD. Anyone know another way to correct it?
__________________
Weapon of Mass Instruction!
parttimetechie's Avatar
parttimetechie parttimetechie is offline
Computer Specs
Account Disabled with 849 posts.
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Huntington Beach, CA USA
Experience: Advanced
16-Apr-2011, 05:31 PM #2
Are you saying the account you are trying to create doesn't have admin privileges or the admin account you are using doesn't have the full set of privs?
Mulderator's Avatar
Member with 51,018 posts.
THREAD STARTER
 
Join Date: Feb 1999
16-Apr-2011, 06:11 PM #3
Quote:
Originally Posted by parttimetechie View Post
Are you saying the account you are trying to create doesn't have admin privileges or the admin account you are using doesn't have the full set of privs?
Not sure what "full admin privleges" are, but what I am saying is the account definitely has some admin privileges (for example I can install software)--it just has some restrictions. For example, if I right click on a shortcut, there is a "Run as Administrator" choice--that shouldn't be there if the account has full administration rights.
parttimetechie's Avatar
parttimetechie parttimetechie is offline
Computer Specs
Account Disabled with 849 posts.
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Huntington Beach, CA USA
Experience: Advanced
16-Apr-2011, 06:19 PM #4
What is your User Account Controls set at? Do you get a pop up box and a dimming of the desktop? That would explain the "run as admin" in the shortcut window.
bbearren's Avatar
Computer Specs
Member with 3,732 posts.
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Central Florida (Polk County)
16-Apr-2011, 06:46 PM #5
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mulderator View Post
Not sure what "full admin privleges" are, but what I am saying is the account definitely has some admin privileges (for example I can install software)--it just has some restrictions. For example, if I right click on a shortcut, there is a "Run as Administrator" choice--that shouldn't be there if the account has full administration rights.
"Run as Administrator" will be there on the right-click menu regardless of account level.

"Full Administrator Privileges" are those available to the Windows default Administrator account (which is disabled by default). Members of the Administrators Group have most of those privileges, but not all.
Mulderator's Avatar
Member with 51,018 posts.
THREAD STARTER
 
Join Date: Feb 1999
16-Apr-2011, 07:57 PM #6
Quote:
Originally Posted by bbearren View Post
"Run as Administrator" will be there on the right-click menu regardless of account level.

"Full Administrator Privileges" are those available to the Windows default Administrator account (which is disabled by default). Members of the Administrators Group have most of those privileges, but not all.
Is that new to Wiindows 7? Because I always had full administrator rights for any account I created as an administrator account. Anyway--here is an example of changing a shortcut for skype (see screen shot). Interestingly--it still allows me to make the change, but gives me the warning message:
Attached Thumbnails
Administrator Account does not have full privileges-capture.jpg  
parttimetechie's Avatar
parttimetechie parttimetechie is offline
Computer Specs
Account Disabled with 849 posts.
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Huntington Beach, CA USA
Experience: Advanced
16-Apr-2011, 08:33 PM #7
That is the UAC I talked about earlier. Bb is right, the Admin account is a default account, the created admin accounts have most, but not all of the privs. Standard users have even less privs
Mulderator's Avatar
Member with 51,018 posts.
THREAD STARTER
 
Join Date: Feb 1999
16-Apr-2011, 08:50 PM #8
Quote:
Originally Posted by parttimetechie View Post
That is the UAC I talked about earlier. Bb is right, the Admin account is a default account, the created admin accounts have most, but not all of the privs. Standard users have even less privs
So what is the point of that? Seems not to make sense to prevent me from giving my main account complete administrator privileges. Does this mean I have to log out and log back in as administrator to do certain things? The reason this came up was I was trying to create a "dot" file in word and save it in a folder in the office subfolder (forget which folder now) and it wouldn't let me save it--told me I needed administrator rights. So do I now have to log out and log back in as administrator to do that? Because if so, I don't get the point of that--is there any way around it?
parttimetechie's Avatar
parttimetechie parttimetechie is offline
Computer Specs
Account Disabled with 849 posts.
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Huntington Beach, CA USA
Experience: Advanced
16-Apr-2011, 09:02 PM #9
When it blocks you and wants admin rights, and you click yes, you should have to put in the admin password. I'll ask again, what is your User Access Control settings set at? That might make all the difference. And the point is so that viruses can't make changes to your system without your permission. I turned my UAC off, and have no problems as a normal admin account.
TerryNet's Avatar
Computer Specs
Moderator with 65,928 posts.
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Ottawa, IL
16-Apr-2011, 09:03 PM #10
The point of the UAC is that Microsoft apparently decided to put some Unix/Linux type security into Vista and Windows 7. The theory is that when malware tries to run a program or make a "system" change you will be sufficiently alert to not click on 'Continue.'
OVERLORDCHAOS's Avatar
OVERLORDCHAOS OVERLORDCHAOS is offline OVERLORDCHAOS has a Profile Picture
OVERLORDCHAOS has a Photo Album
Member with 238 posts.
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Montevideo, Uruguay
Experience: Hawking
16-Apr-2011, 09:08 PM #11
the complete administrator priviledges (in other words the administrator account was created as a debug option since its a "god" account. UAC will never ask you anything, you can change all as in xp and never be prompted for admin priviledges, ru virus and UAC will never notice about it or the microsoft security essentials etc) in other words, its almoust like be a microsoft programmer changing the source code of windows (compared to the normal administrator group accounts).
basically, you are a normal user with elevated permissions.
its like if your dad where the owner of pepsi. you have permission to take all the bottles you want to drink. but you cannot sell the company fired anyone or destroy some machine. the "provide administrator priviledge" would be like ask you dad to fire someone and that he calls to the boss and make him fired.
in other plain words, you are a normal user with minor administrator permissions on windows 7.
if you disable UAC many old programs will go insane. from raging anger screaming at you that you are not an administrator stop tryng hacking the system, from stupid errors like do all the setup (installing a program) just to find out that copied all the files but no registry key. or all the registry keys and no files. etc.
if you use the built in administrator account (i know how to enable it) you are at risk.
i once used the admin account and in 3 months a virus deleted my MBR and partition table from my DOCUMENTS hard disk (in one disk the os and programs in the other all my documents so i dont need to do a backup. a clean install every time i need to do it free of backups).
the UAC its like a tiny slave of microsoft inside the pc that makes sure you wanna run a program.
from the calculator to office etc. and stops the evil viruses and other malware from destroy the pc.
parttimetechie's Avatar
parttimetechie parttimetechie is offline
Computer Specs
Account Disabled with 849 posts.
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Huntington Beach, CA USA
Experience: Advanced
16-Apr-2011, 09:32 PM #12
That is a most interesting explanation..I got lost about half way through. I turned UAC off and have no problems, but then again I keep a tight lid on my system.
OVERLORDCHAOS's Avatar
OVERLORDCHAOS OVERLORDCHAOS is offline OVERLORDCHAOS has a Profile Picture
OVERLORDCHAOS has a Photo Album
Member with 238 posts.
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Montevideo, Uruguay
Experience: Hawking
16-Apr-2011, 09:36 PM #13
ok as you wish.
but its like play russian roullette or sex without a condom.
you are risking your os life for nothing.
TerryNet's Avatar
Computer Specs
Moderator with 65,928 posts.
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Ottawa, IL
16-Apr-2011, 09:44 PM #14
Let's not get too over-dramatic. I think the UAC is a good addition, but disabling it simply gives you security-wise an XP system. I've had at least one XP system for 8 1/2 years and have yet to get a serious infection.
Mulderator's Avatar
Member with 51,018 posts.
THREAD STARTER
 
Join Date: Feb 1999
16-Apr-2011, 09:55 PM #15
Okay--the issue with viruses makes sense as to the securities--thanks for that information.

So I "unhid" my administrator account so I could login as that if I wanted to. Should I hide it again? In other words if that shows up as an option in the original login screen, is that a security issue?

As an aside, I am VERY IMPRESSED with Windows 7 (using 32 bit, professional). I am most amazed at how it recognizes my IoBox server and I can control it directly from my laptop.
As Seen On

BBC, Reader's Digest, PC Magazine, Today Show, Money Magazine
WELCOME TO TECH SUPPORT GUY!

Are you looking for the solution to your computer problem? Join our site today to ask your question. This site is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations.

If you're not already familiar with forums, watch our Welcome Guide to get started.


(clock)
THIS THREAD HAS EXPIRED.
Are you having the same problem? We have volunteers ready to answer your question, but first you'll have to join for free. Need help getting started? Check out our Welcome Guide.

Search Tech Support Guy

Find the solution to your
computer problem!




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools


WELCOME
You Are Using: Server ID
Trusted Website Back to the Top ↑