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1 out of 4 networked computers not able to connect to internet

Discussion in 'Networking' started by kathybrj, Jan 6, 2004.

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  1. kathybrj

    kathybrj Thread Starter

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    We have a small office with 4 computers- 1 acts as our server and the other 3 are for the 3 folks working in the office.

    All were running fine- had internet access, etc. All computers had access to shared drives and, oddly enough, still do- even the one shared printer. BUT 1 computer now can not access the internet (when we try, it comes up as a "can not connect to the server" window). But, this same computer can access all the shared drives with all the other computers.

    One computer guy says logic board is bad, after playing with the ethernet card for an hour . Another says maybe, but maybe it's a corrupt Winsock application (the computer in question is running windows 98 se).

    We are a small office with not a lot to spend on a new computer. But we do need internet access for some of the things we do in the office, so it's been a bit of a pain in the rump.

    Any ideas? New logic board? Anyway to check it? Or just go ahead and replace it?

    Any chance that it's a software issue? One minute it was fine, next it wouldn't browse.

    Thanks, in advance :)
     
  2. Bob Cerelli

    Bob Cerelli

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    If you have network access, then likely the hardware is ok and I'm not sure what "logic board" might be referring to.

    From the Win98 computer:

    1. Can you ping the IP address of one local computer.
    2. Can you ping the IP address of your gateway.
    3. Can you ping an external IP address. (maybe the DNS server)
    4. Can you ping an external name.

    If you think the protocol stack files are corrupted, you can:

    1. Temporariliy add another protocol stack.
    2. Remove NetBEUI
    3. Reboot.
    4. Then add it TCP/IP again and remove NetBEUI

    You will need to have access to the Win98 source files for this.
     
  3. Bob Cerelli

    Bob Cerelli

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    Slight typo in that last post:

    1. Temporariliy add another protocol stack (e.g. NetBEUI)
    2. Remove TCP/IP
    3. Reboot.
    4. Then add it TCP/IP again and remove NetBEUI
     
  4. kathybrj

    kathybrj Thread Starter

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    I don't need NetBeui for that computer to still be networked, correct?
     
  5. Bob Cerelli

    Bob Cerelli

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    NetBEUI has never been a requirement for networking. Just need to get TCP/IP configured correctly.
     
  6. kathybrj

    kathybrj Thread Starter

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    Great- thanks Bob- I'll give it a shot...
     
  7. Bob Cerelli

    Bob Cerelli

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    Basically just have the same IP scheme (e.g. 192.168.0.x), same subnet mask, gateway and DNS addresses.

    There's really not that much otherwise to do other than the default settings.

    Also not sure why there are so many posts to mask TCP/IP problems by adding NetBEUI. I would rather uncover what is really going on. One recent one, where the guy was told to just install NetBEUI, it turned out that he would have been unnecessarily paying an extra $10/month for Internet access for each additional computer and had no firewall in place. One it was determined how to configure TCP/IP properly he saved money and was better protected.
     
  8. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

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    I'd sure like to hear how adding NETBEUI ends up costing 10/mo for each connection, that should be a good story. :confused:
     
  9. Bob Cerelli

    Bob Cerelli

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    It was a recent one where he was having trouble networking computers with just TCP/IP. The solution given was to use NetBEUI. While this did work, and most people would have been satisfied and let it go, it still masked his real problem.

    Fortunately he didn't let it go and we continued to get to the bottom of the problem.

    Turned out his ISP assigned him two different IP schemes and subnet masks, so the computers would not see eachother on a LAN with just TCP/IP. This is why NetBEUI seemed to work.

    But what wasn't unconvered until we kept going was that he was unnecessarily paying around $10/month for that extra IP address. Also he was directly connected to the Internet with no firewall. As I understand it now, he is trying to get a regular DSL router and just a single IP address. Won't take too long before he is breaking even dollar wise and it will serve as a reasonable firewall.

    I certainly couldn't have predicted that cause ahead of time but it just gives one example of why I would rather get to the root cause of getting TCP/IP to work than band-aid a network by using another protocol.
     
  10. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

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    OK, but NETBEUI was not the cause of him paying for an extra IP address. :) If he had happened to be assigned two addresses on the same subnet, he would have been sharing with just TCP/IP, and still paying for the two IP addresses, correct? NETBEUI is just a red herring in this story...
     
  11. Bob Cerelli

    Bob Cerelli

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    NetBEUI was certainly not the cause of the extra monthly charge. Maybe I didn't explain it well enough. The extra charge was for the second IP address, which was on a different subnet and used a different subnet mask.

    Yes, NetBEUI was the red herring that kept him from getting to the bottom of the problem so he could save that money each month. Not a fortune but it adds up month after month.
     
  12. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

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    I can't disagree that having two IP addresses is not very cost effective, you just threw me by inferring that NETBEUI was the reason. :D Hopefully he has a broadband router and is a happy camper now. :)
     
  13. Brian Mills

    Brian Mills

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    I've seen this type of situation couple of times recently.

    The ISP wants to make a few extra bucks and installs individual static IP address that are directly accessable to the Internet. This way they get their extra monthly charge.

    Then in addition, the IP scheme is slightly different. Even if the difference is on only one computer, this makes it hard to network just using TCP/IP.

    So the network person before me takes the shortcut approach,
    doesn't try and figure things out, and 0just installs NetBEUI to make them happy...

    Until they realized that they didn't need to pay for all those extra addresses (one was over $60/month total), and that they had no firewall. If the NetBEUI workaround had been left on, they never would have had a decent solution.

    A simple DSL router solved both their problems. But you have to be willing to take a little time to figure out why the network didn't work in the first place.

    Brian.
     
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