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1080p TV display latency in 16:9?

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Claire_Kitty, Apr 23, 2014.

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  1. Claire_Kitty

    Claire_Kitty Thread Starter

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    Tech Support Guy System Info Utility version 1.0.0.2
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    Hi, I'm trying to use my TV as a monitor with HDMI but I am having problems. I have a 32" 1080p Insignia TV (model number ns-32l450a11) whose native resolution is reported to be 1920x1080 on all specs listings I could find on the internet. However, the 1920x1080 option only outputs in 30Hz, with considerable latency. The color quality and image clarity is fine, but the image needs to be overscanned. I was able to find a workaround in the form of a custom driver someone made, and unlocked it to 60Hz. With this, the TV maintains the high input lag. I tried changing to any available option and I found that 1280x768 operates with very little lag , comparable to my other monitor. Does this mean that this TV actually has a 5:3 native aspect ratio? What I want to know is, is there any way to get 1080p to happen with the same small amount of lag as 1280x768, or perhaps if there is a way I can use a higher resolution in 5:3 ratio? Do Nvidia/Intel based machines have this issue?
     
  2. Oddba11

    Oddba11

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    It's not a PC (ie: nVidia or Intel) issue. It's a TV issue. This is a common problem when using TV's as a monitor. Most TV's suffer from the same problem. They aren't designed to function for your intended use. Hence the reason monitors cost more than a comparable sized TV, even though a TV has additional hardware to meet it's function (as a TV).
     
  3. Triple6

    Triple6 Moderator

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    Using a PC/VGA cable is generally the best way to avoid this issue.

    Also some TV's have a lower resolution for PC input than their advertised maximum, 1366x768 or 1360x768 is pretty common.
     
  4. Claire_Kitty

    Claire_Kitty Thread Starter

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    I see.. Oh well, I'll just live with this as it is. It's still nice to have a large screen, low res or not.
     
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