2.4GHz, 5.0GHz??

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raybro

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I'm in the process of researching the appropriate/best wireless router to connect to my Hughesnet satellite equipment currently connected via Ethernet. What I'm looking for is how to go about selecting a good, reliable and compatible wireless router. There are a lot of them out there. I don't want to pay any more than I need to and do not need anything exotic nor do I want to have to mess with it. Just set it up and use it.

I have reviewed my Owners Manual and am unable to find any reference to the operating frequency. Looking at the various routers available, some have both 2.5GHz and 5.0GHz while others have only one frequency. I have the impression that allows multiple computers which may operate on different frequencies to access the network. Is that the principle? should I care if there will only be my computer connected. How can I ascertain which frequency my Dell needs? Is that an automatic function? My Dell Inspiron 1501 has a Dell WLAN (WiFi) card installed which I have used numerous times in various places. Connecting to an existing network is quite simple.

As you can probably tell, this is a relatively new area for me. I'm pretty well versed in the majority of hardware and software aspects of computers, but need a little help here. I'll continue my research online, but have great appreciate the wisdom and experience of others on my favorite forum.

Raybro
 

cwwozniak

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Instead of comparing frequencies, you should be checking to see which 801.11 standard(s) are supported by your computer's WiFi hardware and then find a suitable wireless router. Some people here may have particular brand and model number recommendations.

The article in the above link is a bit out of date. The 802.11n standard was finalized in Sept., 2009. There were companies releasing hardware based on proposed versions of the 802.11n standard before that date but there was no guarantee of it working, particularly if the wireless hard was made by two different companies. If your computer supports 802.11n and is a bit older, there is a possibility that an 802.11n connection may not work with a router that supports 802.11n. In which case they would probably fall back to an 802.11g connection.

Even if you are in the middle of nowhere with no nearby neighbors, it still would not hurt to use an encrypted wireless (WPA preferred over WEP) connection.

FWiW, a wireless router supports multiple computer connections using the same frequency at the same time. It time shares the bandwidth, quickly switching between computers.
 

raybro

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'Preciate the response cwwozniak. There seems to be a myriad of routers available which meet the 802.11(n) draft and draft 2.0 (?) standards, but none I have found meet the released 802,11(n) standard. But, as you say, the connection can always fall back to the (g) standard.

Anything is better than what I've been using for the last few years... Dial-up. :( :mad:

I've read numerous reviews on various routers by cnet and pcmag and haven't come to any conclusions as yet. Any recommendations based on use would be appreciated. Range is not a critical factor in and of itself, but would seem to correlate to connection stability at reasonable ranges.

Still do not understand the significance the the two frequencies I referred to earlier, but am still looking.

Raybro
 

JohnWill

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I believe anything that met the 802.11n draft2 specification will meet the final specification, as I understand it only documentation details changed between those versions.
 

cwwozniak

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The article in my first link touches on the differences between using the 2.4 and 5.0 GHz frequency ranges.

802.11b and 802.11g share the 2.4 GHz band with cordless phones and microwave ovens and are subject to interference from such nearby devices as well as other nearby 802.11 networks on the same channel. However 2.4 GHz signals can travel farther and have an easier time passing through walls.

802.11a uses the higher 5.0 GHz band and may only be subject to interference from other 802.11a and 802.11n networks using the same channel. The 5.0 GHz signals do not travel as far and are attenuated more than 2.4 GHz signals when passing through walls. The 5.0 GHz hardware typically costs more than 2.4 GHz hardware.

802.11n uses both the 2.4 and 5.0 GHz bands.
 

raybro

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Thanks for clarifying all that, cwwozniak. I'm gettin there. :D

Appreciate your patience. :)

Raybro
 
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