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320GB RAID 0 VS 250GB SATA...please help!...

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by MdDg37, Oct 6, 2004.

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  1. MdDg37

    MdDg37 Thread Starter

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    I am trying to decide what type of HD to put in my computer...a 250GB SATA or a 320GB RAID 0 (2 x 160GB SATA HDDs)...and would really appreciate hearing your thoughts.

    I will be using it mostly for everything from statistical analysis, writing, etc. to music, pictures, DVDs and flight simulator work. The bottom line is data preservation is important. I have lately been hearing that RAID 0 does not provide any real performance improvements and carries more risk of data loss. I have also been told by the folks at Symantec and Norton that some programs such as Go Back will not work on RAID disks.

    If what I have been told is true, RAID 0 carries little in the way of performance improvements, but an increase in data loss risk and more limiting in some program availability making the 250GB SATA sound more appealing.

    Could you please tell me if this is true...what are your experiences/thoughts?

    Thank you very much!
     
  2. lego1496

    lego1496

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    Get the 250 SATA. Its the safest and although not the biggest , in the future you could get another 250 gig one too.
     
  3. MdDg37

    MdDg37 Thread Starter

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    Thank you lego1496 for your help...I was leaning that way myself, now I feel much more confident in my decision. Your point about adding another 250 GB HDD in the future if necessary makes a lot more sense.

    Thank you very much again for your help...I really appreciate it!!
     
  4. lego1496

    lego1496

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  5. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

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    I agree, unless you have a very good reason for using RAID, it's probably wise to stick with the SATA drive. Much simpler to configure and live with. :)
     
  6. crjdriver

    crjdriver Moderator

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    Raid 0 provides a significant increase in read / write speed over a single sata drive. It does not provide any data redundancy however. If you are concerned about data loss, you can run raid 1 which mirrors the disk. If one disk fails, you install another and rebuild the array. This option is not available with raid 0.

    Raid adds complexity to your system. If you do not need the extra speed of raid 0, I would stick to either ide or sata. IMO there is not any real world difference in speed between the two.

    As for using go back, I would use a good disk image program instead. Something like ghost or acronis true image. BTW acronis can restore raid / scsi disks without a problem.
     
  7. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

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    IMO, the average user is more likely to lose data using RAID vs. not using RAID. Just read all the messages from people having issues trying to get RAID configured or recovering data after a problem. :)

    I'd much rather have a second hard disk in an external USB/Firewire case and have real backups.
     
  8. crjdriver

    crjdriver Moderator

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    I agree completely. A third hd or external disk is required if you want to use raid. All important info should be backed up to a third hd, dvdr, cdr, etc.

    I like the extra speed that raid 0 affords. It made a very noticeable difference in my main system at home.
     
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