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7 Useful Linux Networking Commands

Discussion in 'Linux and Unix' started by lotuseclat79, Apr 19, 2010.

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  1. lotuseclat79

    lotuseclat79 Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2003
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    7 Useful Linux Networking Commands (2 web pages).

    This tutorial covers the commands and topics of:
    ifconfig, iwconfig, ethtool, and tcpdump/network packet sniffing, ping and netstat, hostnaming.

    -- Tom
     
  2. KristineHabeck

    KristineHabeck

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2010
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    Commands are simply great! however, I think that every complicated commands of Linux is useful in all ways. Every command is necessary to take advantage of Linux platform.
     
  3. lotuseclat79

    lotuseclat79 Thread Starter

    Joined:
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    Messages:
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    Hi KristineHabeck,

    Yes, they are great! Reading the man page on each command is, however, mandatory to really get to know what one is doing and what all the options can do for you. It is best to do small experiments with test files in separate directories to try things out to see how everything works. From there, you can begin to combine commands together in a script that lessens the workload of repetitive tasks, etc.

    -- Tom
     
  4. flan_suse

    flan_suse

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2010
    Messages:
    74
    That makes a good bookmark for a quick and useful way to remember some important networking commands.

    Playing around with SystemRescueCD, I discovered that in 3 steps, using only the command-line, you can fully configure a wired ethernet adapter and activate it so that it is internet-ready. These steps are not really necessary for desktop-oriented/user-friendly distros like Mint, openSUSE, Ubuntu, and Fedora, but they do come in handy if you're using a terminal or rescue CD. These commands need to be run as root or following "sudo", depending on the distro. Change the IP addresses accordingly.

    First, activate the wired network card and assign it an IP address:
    Code:
    ifconfig eth0 192.168.1.2 up
    Next, point it to your router as the default gateway:
    Code:
    route add default gw 192.168.1.1
    Finally, add a DNS server for name-resolution:
    Code:
    echo "nameserver 8.8.8.8" >> /etc/resolve.conf
    You should now be up-and-running and internet-ready. Of course, sometimes matters become more complicated based on other factors, but these three steps will usually suffice.

    The last step can be repeated multiple times if you wish to add more DNS servers to the list. I recommend adding your router's IP address first, then add other DNS servers, such as OpenDNS or Google's public DNS.
     
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