A little stumped

zx10guy

Trusted Advisor
Spam Fighter
Joined
Mar 30, 2008
Messages
6,573
Hi. Sorry about the delay in responding here.

For clarity, are you getting those speed test numbers connecting over WiFi? If so, there are many variables at play here on the ultimate real world experience you will get. First is if there is any other interfering sources which will affect your WiFi network. Second is the type of wireless devices you're using. There's more to wireless than just getting say an 802.11ac router and a laptop with an 802.11ac wireless NIC. You have to look at the specs of each device in your wireless network. The specs involve how many spatial streams each one can support. You'll see this typically listed as 1x1, 2x2, 3x3, 3x2, etc. What this means is the number of simultaneous streams a device can support both receive and send. In the case of 802.11n as the numbers are easy, each spatial stream can support 150Mbps. So a 1x1 device can do 150Mbps receive and send. If the device has 2x2, then that means it can do 300Mbps receive and send. 802.11n has a maximum of 3x3 which means 450Mbps which lines up with all the advertised marketing speeds put out for 802.11n. But keep in mind these are theoretical.

For reference, I have 2 fairly new Dell laptops. One is an XPS13 and the other is a Precision 5520. Both top out at around 200-250Mbps on my wireless network over 802.11ac. In contrast, my HP 840G3 has registered 500Mbps.

As to mesh wireless systems, they are the best solution for home users looking to provide the best coverage in their homes. Extenders/range boosters/repeaters are total junk as they act as another wireless client to your wireless router. This adds latency in the path to a wireless client connected on the other end of the extender. The other thing it does is cuts in half the bandwidth you have available over your wireless network. Add both together and you drastically kill performance regardless of being able to see full bars on your laptop. Mesh systems go about this a different way. From what I've read, either the mesh system will use a radio that is not being heavily utilized to send data back to the central "hub" of the mesh as its backhaul connection. The more sophisticated ones will use a dedicated wireless backhaul over a triband system. In addition, mesh devices are managed centrally as all devices in the mesh have awareness of each other. You will get better wireless roaming along with better wireless performance with client connections as member mesh devices will not broadcast their signal so hot as to stomp over the neighboring mesh device. This feature will also aid in roaming and more seamless client handoffs between mesh devices.
 

Couriant

James
Moderator
Joined
Mar 26, 2002
Messages
38,789
By tagging him like we did, it will make an alert when he logs in. Please note, this is a public forum where the members use their own time so they may not respond straight away. Plus it is the holidays so that would be a factor.

The speeds you are paying for is not from the wireless, but from the modem to the server. So really you should be only concerned of the speeds when you are connected with an Ethernet cable to the modem directly. No internet provider will guarantee the full speeds on wireless as I mentioned because there will be factors to prevent it reaching the maximum it can. Considering that you are getting those speeds, both up and down, I wouldn't be too concerned on the wireless connection.

If you are looking to use your own wireless router and modem, this modem is the common modem most if not all ISPs uses.

Since you are getting half of the speeds, you will need to confirm this by using another computer directly connected to your modem. If you are getting half the speeds with another device, then that could be the issue with the modem, or you are not getting the speeds to the modem. That could be caused by overutilization in your area or signal issues.
 

KrisK91

Thread Starter
Joined
Dec 1, 2020
Messages
13
Hi. Sorry about the delay in responding here.

For clarity, are you getting those speed test numbers connecting over WiFi? If so, there are many variables at play here on the ultimate real world experience you will get. First is if there is any other interfering sources which will affect your WiFi network. Second is the type of wireless devices you're using. There's more to wireless than just getting say an 802.11ac router and a laptop with an 802.11ac wireless NIC. You have to look at the specs of each device in your wireless network. The specs involve how many spatial streams each one can support. You'll see this typically listed as 1x1, 2x2, 3x3, 3x2, etc. What this means is the number of simultaneous streams a device can support both receive and send. In the case of 802.11n as the numbers are easy, each spatial stream can support 150Mbps. So a 1x1 device can do 150Mbps receive and send. If the device has 2x2, then that means it can do 300Mbps receive and send. 802.11n has a maximum of 3x3 which means 450Mbps which lines up with all the advertised marketing speeds put out for 802.11n. But keep in mind these are theoretical.

For reference, I have 2 fairly new Dell laptops. One is an XPS13 and the other is a Precision 5520. Both top out at around 200-250Mbps on my wireless network over 802.11ac. In contrast, my HP 840G3 has registered 500Mbps.

As to mesh wireless systems, they are the best solution for home users looking to provide the best coverage in their homes. Extenders/range boosters/repeaters are total junk as they act as another wireless client to your wireless router. This adds latency in the path to a wireless client connected on the other end of the extender. The other thing it does is cuts in half the bandwidth you have available over your wireless network. Add both together and you drastically kill performance regardless of being able to see full bars on your laptop. Mesh systems go about this a different way. From what I've read, either the mesh system will use a radio that is not being heavily utilized to send data back to the central "hub" of the mesh as its backhaul connection. The more sophisticated ones will use a dedicated wireless backhaul over a triband system. In addition, mesh devices are managed centrally as all devices in the mesh have awareness of each other. You will get better wireless roaming along with better wireless performance with client connections as member mesh devices will not broadcast their signal so hot as to stomp over the neighboring mesh device. This feature will also aid in roaming and more seamless client handoffs between mesh devices.
Oh you're fine. I wasn't sure if I needed to send you a DM. I have an HP Notebook - 14-dk0028wm which I am not sure what Wi-Fi speeds it can handle but I am sure can handle speeds around 400-600 mbps. But can defiantly handle hardwired connections of 1 Gig.
Right now when I run a speed test over Wifi on my laptop I am only getting speeds around 150-220 mbps. When I am hardwired I am only seeing speeds around 600mbps somedays. I am paying for Xfinitys Gig speed plan. I had Xfinity come to the house the other day and say I would never see speeds close to Gig speeds hardwired. I didn't understand why if I am paying for those speeds. He said in my area it isn't common to actually get those speeds. But he tested the lines inside and outside the house and said everything looked good and I should be getting decent speeds. He connected to my modem and he was only getting around 200mbps on his ipad and his exact words were "oh wow your speeds are sh!t" so he swapped out my gateway with another one he had in his truck and got it up and running and he tested it again and he was seeing the same speeds of around 200mbps. When I had their Blast! internet which is 300mbps when I had that plan I was getting speeds around 150-250 over Wifi easily. So I am seeing the same speeds with both the 300mbps and the Gig speed internet plans.
The specs involve how many spatial streams each one can support. You'll see this typically listed as 1x1, 2x2, 3x3, 3x2, etc
I am not sure what you mean by this, can you please explain? Where would I see this?

I am thinking about a mesh system. Are they better then a high performance router? What would be a good mesh system to get?
 

KrisK91

Thread Starter
Joined
Dec 1, 2020
Messages
13
By tagging him like we did, it will make an alert when he logs in. Please note, this is a public forum where the members use their own time so they may not respond straight away. Plus it is the holidays so that would be a factor.

The speeds you are paying for is not from the wireless, but from the modem to the server. So really you should be only concerned of the speeds when you are connected with an Ethernet cable to the modem directly. No internet provider will guarantee the full speeds on wireless as I mentioned because there will be factors to prevent it reaching the maximum it can. Considering that you are getting those speeds, both up and down, I wouldn't be too concerned on the wireless connection.

If you are looking to use your own wireless router and modem, this modem is the common modem most if not all ISPs uses.

Since you are getting half of the speeds, you will need to confirm this by using another computer directly connected to your modem. If you are getting half the speeds with another device, then that could be the issue with the modem, or you are not getting the speeds to the modem. That could be caused by overutilization in your area or signal issues.
Oh sorry I understand I didn't know if I had to DM him. I have tired everything from trying another computer to resetting the gateway. I just don't know anymore. Xfinity believes it is "normal" and there isn't anything more they can do or offer to make it right.
 

KrisK91

Thread Starter
Joined
Dec 1, 2020
Messages
13
Alright I asked this before but I need some additional help.
I have Xfinity's Gig speed internet plan.
I have rent their XB7 modem (the newest)
Equipment I have is the XB7 modem, a Linksys EA7500, TP-Link Archer C7, TP-Link 8 Port Managed Gigabit Switch (TL-SG108E).
I am looking to hook all this connected and have it work correctly. I am really looking to have all 3 on different networks if possible.
I am not sure what I am doing wrong. I currently have the TP-Link 8 Port Managed Gig Switch hardwired to the XB7.
XB7 ---> TP-Link 8 Port Managed Gig Switch ---> TP-Link Archer C7. Is there a way to have DHCP enabled on all 3 devices to hand out different IP address?
XB7 ---> Linksys EA7500
When I connect to the TP-Link Archer C7 I find I can't send emails. Like it shows it sent but it doesn't actually get sent out.
Like I stated earlier I would really like all 3 devices to assign specific IP address. I would like the XB7 to assign a range of IPs from 192.168.1.2 to 192.168.1.99 and have the Linksys EA7500 assign a range of IP addresses from 192.168.1.100 to 192.168.1.199 and the TP Link Archer C7 to assign a range of IP addresses from 192.168.1.200 to 192.168.1.249. I'm stuck I would really like to see a specific IP address and know which router/device it is connected to. I really would prefer not to set up the Linksys EA7500 and the TP-Link Archer C7 as Access Point. I would really like to use the routers as actual routers and not AP's if possible. I would like for all 3 devices to see each other. I am trying to use the TP-Link Archer C7 further away in another remote location that has a different client devices connecting to that one so maybe if this one is more isolated from the XB7 and the Linksys EA7500 wouldn't be a bad idea. Or maybe having them all be different networks and secluded from one another.

I am just finding myself having to change settings on the devices from day to day to get the devices to work correct. I would really like it all to just be set up and work properly all the time.

Screenshot 2021-01-20 17.11.19.png

Screenshot 2021-01-20 17.20.09.png

Screenshot 2021-01-20 17.20.19.png


<removed personal information>

Thank you!!
 

Couriant

James
Moderator
Joined
Mar 26, 2002
Messages
38,789
Hello! Placing personal information on a public forum could lead to nasty people sending you spam.

You shouldn't have multiple routers using the same network id as it will cause issues with the routing. You will need to turn off DHCP on the other routers and let the modem control the DHCP.
 

KrisK91

Thread Starter
Joined
Dec 1, 2020
Messages
13
Sorry I just needed quick help I figured posting that info would help get help quicker.
So having the other two routers attached to the XB7 would then have to be set in AP mode?
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 1)

As Seen On
As Seen On...

Welcome to Tech Support Guy!

Are you looking for the solution to your computer problem? Join our site today to ask your question. This site is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations.

If you're not already familiar with forums, watch our Welcome Guide to get started.

Join over 807,865 other people just like you!

Latest posts

Members online

Top