A weird doubt about how networking works.

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fatboynotslim

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Namaste!

I was wondering how to LAN, WLAN, WAN, MAN etc. work. Do they need to have specific setups? On top of that my biggest doubt is that can cell phone towers be used to produce WiFi signals?
 

TerryNet

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On top of that my biggest doubt is that can cell phone towers be used to produce WiFi signals?
You could install a Wi-Fi radio on a tower, but a tower itself does not produce any wireless signal (although it, of course, is adorned with at least one transmitting/receiving antenna).
 

fatboynotslim

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You could install a Wi-Fi radio on a tower, but a tower itself does not produce any wireless signal (although it, of course, is adorned with at least one transmitting/receiving antenna).
Do you know if by any chance the range that Wi-Fi radio on a tower would offer? Would it be as effective as a cell phone tower?
 

zx10guy

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Do you know if by any chance the range that Wi-Fi radio on a tower would offer? Would it be as effective as a cell phone tower?
No. The FCC regulates output power of all RF devices in the US. As a comparison to what I'm talking about. Indoor WiFi APs are limited to a max output of 250mW. Outdoor WiFi APs are allowed to transmit a bit hotter at a max of 630mW. In comparison, cellular transmitters on cell towers have a typical actual radiated power of between 5 to 10W.
 

zx10guy

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Namaste!

I was wondering how to LAN, WLAN, WAN, MAN etc. work. Do they need to have specific setups? On top of that my biggest doubt is that can cell phone towers be used to produce WiFi signals?
To answer your first question, yes, each network type you've listed requires specific hardware. LAN (local area networks) usually employ the use of switches. The expectation is network traffic will be contained in a local physical location. Hence the local part of LAN and how the protocol doesn't support long range transmission compared to WAN type devices. WLAN (wireless LAN) is the same principle as a LAN but the use of wireless for the transmission medium. WAN (wide area network) is when you're stretching very long distances (ie Internet). MAN (metro area network) is something between WAN and LAN. MANs are deployed in a city type environment when there are offices which are connected to each other spread throughout the city. These networks use equipment which can support very high speeds the same or close to some LAN speeds. An example of a MAN is the use of Metro Ethernet or SONET rings.
 
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