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Anti-RIAA

Discussion in 'Web & Email' started by cyber19583, Sep 28, 2003.

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  1. cyber19583

    cyber19583 Thread Starter

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    currently dorming at a university...would like to have downloading ability of music and movies...the university has blocked WinMx and i do not trust KaZaa......Tesla is pretty good but the selections available are usually limited or not on GO ( the yellows and reds outnumber the greens)..........can anyone suggest some alternative programs that would allow downloads to be done without too much RIAA concern...THANKS!!
     
  2. CastleHeart

    CastleHeart

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    In the present climate with the RIAA on the warpath trying to shore-up their outmoded business model that has driven away the public, rather than deal with the change that is long overdue in their industry - you will have to make your own personal judgment as to what you can and can't do.

    Currently Kazaa is the choice if you want selection. That is why the RIAA is after it the most. If you make use of Kazaa you are running a risk. If you are an infrequent user it probably is actually very small - but it is there. The RIAA's current tactic is to scare away the small guys that make up that vast library, so that (they assume) - the whole world will buy more CDs and life and their checkbooks will return to normal.

    As I understand it there are two new P2Ps coming up from the shadows. But like all those in the past they will not have much of a showing unless the demise of the Giants thrusts them into the limelight. There are service like the APPLE music store currently being sued by the Beatles that sell songs individually. A model the RIAA fought because their greed didn't like it but eventually embraced as an alternative to losing all control. Unfortunately that greed still places a high royalty on services like Apple and it makes it hard to sell individual songs to the eager public at a price that makes it attractive.

    (My view is - if I like an artist and his CD - I buy it. But if I want a song or two and don't care for the rest of the paste or am digging for an oldie - I share it.

    I know this answer didn't help much. But if you copy music over the Internet you will have to go where you have to and weigh the costs. (strange though.... you can copy it off the public airways or a friends CD and never worry! Go figure! I's all about $$$$$$$$)

    - C
     
  3. Steve-x8086

    Steve-x8086

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    I had LP's before there were 8 Tracks. Then I enjoyed 8 Tracks and recorded some from my LP's. Not long after, Cassettes came out and it was heaven. Good sound, plenty of time and the ability to record the songs I wanted to hear.

    The Congress said it was legal to share cassettes, copy other peoples LP's and cassettes for my own use. VCR's and VHS tapes were the same for TV and Movies.

    Then the electronics industry went to the next level and CD's were born. CD's are the replacement of cassettes and used for the same purpose. What difference does it make if I use cassettes or CD's for recording music for myself and to share with my friends?

    We need to get this clearly through to our Congressmen. The sooner, the better.

    Before long, we won't be able to record TV shows. And if we still can, we will be not able to fast forward past commercials.

    Sincerely, Steve-x8086
     
  4. slipe

    slipe

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    The law you don’t seem to understand says you have the right to make a single copy of media you legally own for your own use. It has never been legal to borrow a recording from the library or a friend and copy it for your own use. The law does not differentiate between media types including CD. You can copy an LP, tape or non-protected CD to either tape or CD. Few audio CDs are copy protected. The law extends to program CDs as well, and I believe extends even to allowing you to copy a book you legally own. They did make exceptions for DVD in making newer copy laws specific against DVD, but that has nothing to do with your post.

    You should be able to protect the original from harm and make a copy for backup or use in portable devices if you legally purchased the music or program. It was never intended to allow persons to bypass copyright protections to steal music they have no rights to.

    You aren’t going to have legal problems copying a friend’s CD any more than you did illegally copying LPs and cassettes you didn’t have rights to. But had you started a club to exchange music so only one person would buy an LP and everyone could copy it you might have come on somebody’s radar if the club was large and public. You have no more right to steal copyrighted materials because you don’t want to pay for them than you do to steal a car because you don’t want to pay for it. Because you have gotten away with theft in the past is no reason to expect Congress to pass a law so you can continue. It isn’t going to happen.

    Everything on my computer isn’t completely legal and I indeed copied other people’s LPs to cassette in the old days. At least I’m smart enough to know it is wrong.
     
  5. Steve-x8086

    Steve-x8086

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    Thanks for your input. I think that you should look further into the law passed regarding Cassettes back in the 70's. This very thing was addressed and it was allowed for friends to trade, pass around and share cassettes. Then the Music companies, in the early 80's, developed the digital recording on CD's and got Congress to pass a law giving them the exclusive right to be the only people that may put music on CD's digitally. This happened before recording on CD's was available to anybody.

    The Music Industry is trying to make people buy more than they did before as they try and use this "Digital" law.

    No, I am not a pirate. However, I expect to have the right to place and playback any music that I own or have recorded from the radio and TV on whatever kind of media I want, 8 Track, Cassette, CD, Hard Drive, MP3's, VHS Ect... Without interference from the RIAA or anyone else. That is not stealing.

    Check the rulings on Cassettes and VHS - Same should be applicable to CD's and Hard Drives.

    Oh well, enough said. I'll let this one go.

    Steve-x8086
     
  6. CastleHeart

    CastleHeart

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    I certainly don't expect Congress to jump in on our behalf. Congress has been behind the curve in the technology end since the internet was an infant. DMCA was a poorly thought-out knee jerk reaction to their lack of understanding of a new industry. Mention the word Piracy and they can't see beyond it to the root of the problem. One congressman wants to make it a felony to have any copyrighted song - even legally purchased, on your computer in a place that others could access it.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------

    In reality, copyright laws should be refocused and changed for the future to reflect the changing world of technology.
    - You can invent the world's greatest transmission. Market it - get rich from it - but in 10 years I can build one like it.
    - Make the world's best hair growth drug - and enjoy your years on the top because in 7 years the generics force your price back down into the real world.
    - Create the world's first pair of pliers that does everything from open bottles to repair flat tires. You've got 7 to 10 years to get rich while China gears up to make them for $2.99

    Creative ideas can't be penned up forever.
    Copyrights should shift into the same gear:

    You write and sing a song - concert it around for 10 years and get rich! - And at the end of that time, you can have royalties on those who wish to make money off it's commercial use, but the public should be able to copy it for their own use. After all you flooded our public domain with it for years!

    Will this happen? No! I'll be dead first. You'll be dead first!

    And what will the RIAA do when a big digital radio station starts offering it's, 'Front to Back' format... where they don't talk over any part of the song and you can record a fantastic copy? They will again petition Congress to help stop recording that has gone on for years. (And how many industries get free advertising like that... Radio stations nationwide showcase these folks goods for free - trying to get the public addicted to a product that then they alone want to sell you.) Can you imagine a time when all songs play on radio stations have digital tags and finding a song in your library with such a tag is a criminal offense!

    I don't mind the artist getting something for his efforts. I don't mind them getting rich. We like our artists that way. But when the RIAA decides that they want the public to pay for their poor business decisions and excesses I get a bit miffed.

    When it costs $25 to see a football game - I stay home and watch it on TV. When too many people stay home - they stop showing it on TV except for pay per view. When payperview gets to expensive I don't buy it but go to a sports bar. When too many people stop buying pay per view they make it illegal to show at a sport bar. Doesn't anybody stop and back up and look to the root of the problem? Do you think in my business when my customers leave in mass and my profits fall that I can simply make it illegal for them to shop elsewhere or borrow a tool from their neighbor?

    Would you pay 50 cents a song for current tunes? I will? There are a bunch I'd buy right now. But they want it all. And they don't like the idea that resellers might take some of their profits. They have discovered their decades old business methods have taken them out into neck-deep water - and now their thrashing about to get back to shore, rather than asking the millions of music listeners of America to get on board and work together for everbody's benefit.

    This is not about copying songs - it's about $money$ - pure and simple. They haven't cared about the public copying songs or movies for years - till their pocket books hurt. And that hurt is to a large extent their own doing. But they are in a backlash mentality and are out to save their purses.

    Kazaa is a public response to the state of their industry and sky high CD prices. Despite their beliefs, the road on which they have embarked will not bring back the hordes of buyers. They would be smartest to engage the public - meet them part way - and embark on the new direction of technology in entertainment. I am one willing participant - should they ever decide to see the light...

    - Castleheart
     
  7. CastleHeart

    CastleHeart

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    all right...... so I was a bit verbose. that happens sometimes!

    :D - Castleheart
     
  8. Steve-x8086

    Steve-x8086

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    Bravo. Now we are in sync. We need to get this message through to our Congressmen. Readers, write your Legislator.

    Thanks Castleheart.

    Steve-x8086
     
  9. Davey7549

    Davey7549

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    Well Said Castleheart!! Double (y) (y) up to you!
    Hopefully the future will hold a more amicable way to obtain music and movies at reasonable prices but until then we are stuck with the archaic copyright laws and high priced entertainment. I for one do not support file sharing en mass as technology has provided but I sure would like to see this resolved for everybody's sake.

    Dave
     
  10. sekirt

    sekirt

    Joined:
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    It appears the problems have been around longer than anyone knows:

    "Only one thing is impossible for God: To find any sense in any copyright law on the planet."
    - Mark Twain



    I can honestly say, the music industry has lost nothing ($zero) on any music I downloaded or copied. All Oldies. If I was going to buy these, I would have done so when they were new.

    sekirt
     
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