Are AV & AC tech compatible?

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travel-guy

Chris
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Are broadband & wifi extenders and/or repeaters using AV technology compatible with those using AC technology.
I've hunted high and low over the net to try and find out but had no luck.
I originally was using a variety of BT products to boost my network around my home. The WIFI and WIFI MINI home hotspot 500 series along with Broadband extender 500 flex powerline adapters. These all use AV 500 tech. Unfortunately the hotspot started malfunctioning about 5 weeks ago in which the data transfer dropped off. It started once or twice a day and got more frequent. The tech support team at BT asked me to send them back and get them replaced. I had them replaced with the shop I bought them from for the newer AV 600 (due to 500 being discontinued) mini hotspots, but had to go for the TP-Link re200 repeateder in lieu of the regular hotspots as they were out of stock of the BT 600's. The TP-Link uses AC750 tech. I have them all installed but not sure if there's an issue or conflict between the devices as the BT stuff keeps failing. Trying to work out if problem is because did the tech doesn't work together or the problem is caused by something else.
Thanks.
 

zx10guy

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I don't understand your reference to AV tech. There's no such thing with 802.11 wireless.

Let me put this out there, it's no secret on these forums that I do not like range extenders/repeaters. Repeaters for SOHO use operate on the same frequency as the parent wireless network it's extending. What this means is if the parent wireless network is running on a 2.4 GHz signal, the repeater will operate on the same frequency. Same applies to if the parent network is running on a 5 GHz signal. What this means is the wireless performance is cut in half when you have a wireless client connected to the repeater as wireless technology operates as a half duplex system....only one device can transmit at any given time. With this in mind, talking about 802.11ac and trying to take advantage of the increased performance is for the most part useless as you're cutting actual performance in half.

If you must use a wireless repeater type setup, the best system to use is one which uses the 5 GHz frequency for the backhaul between the extender and the main wireless access point. At the extender, it will broadcast over 2.4 GHz for any clients to connect to. While you won't get 802.11ac connectivity at the edge, it works a whole lot better as there is no same frequency contention and using 5 GHz provides for a more reliable backhaul connection versus using 2.4 GHz.

Just my 2 cents.
 

travel-guy

Chris
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Thanks for the response. To be honest I don't know what AV or AC or any of it means. I'm a novice. I going by what is said on the instructions, on their websites.

With re to hotspots and powerline adapters. The device details say

Broadband home network extender

  • Uses your home’s electrical wiring to extend your broadband network anywhere in the house
  • Works with all broadband providers
  • Link with other HomePlug AV powerline adaptors
  • AV500 powerline and N300 wireless technology
  • Compatible with AV200 technology devices
  • Up to 500 Mbps for smooth multiple HD / 3D streaming
  • Secure wireless network – no configuration necessary
  • Simple push-button Wi-Fi connection set-up with your hotspot
  • Two Ethernet ports for multiple wired devices
  • Also available as a kit with the Broadband Extender 500 Flex
  • Find out more about Wi-Fi Home Hotspots

And the says it's a AC750. I'm trying to work out if they will work properly if used on the same network or if I need to replace them.


I don't understand your reference to AV tech. There's no such thing with 802.11 wireless.

Let me put this out there, it's no secret on these forums that I do not like range extenders/repeaters. Repeaters for SOHO use operate on the same frequency as the parent wireless network it's extending. What this means is if the parent wireless network is running on a 2.4 GHz signal, the repeater will operate on the same frequency. Same applies to if the parent network is running on a 5 GHz signal. What this means is the wireless performance is cut in half when you have a wireless client connected to the repeater as wireless technology operates as a half duplex system....only one device can transmit at any given time. With this in mind, talking about 802.11ac and trying to take advantage of the increased performance is for the most part useless as you're cutting actual performance in half.

If you must use a wireless repeater type setup, the best system to use is one which uses the 5 GHz frequency for the backhaul between the extender and the main wireless access point. At the extender, it will broadcast over 2.4 GHz for any clients to connect to. While you won't get 802.11ac connectivity at the edge, it works a whole lot better as there is no same frequency contention and using 5 GHz provides for a more reliable backhaul connection versus using 2.4 GHz.

Just my 2 cents.
 

TerryNet

Terry
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802.11ac is the latest Wi-Fi specification.

A wireless Range Extender (or Repeater) receives Wi-Fi signals and rebroadcasts them. These are what zx10guy described. Newer ones surely support 802.11ac, but older ones will be 802.11n or 'g'.

You, Chris, are talking about Powerline Adapters. They "translate" ethernet signals to signals that travel over your electrical system and then "translate" back to ethernet. Some also include a Wireless Access Point, with the newest ones supporting 802.11ac. Liz said that TP-Link prefixes all their powerline adapters with "AV." The "AV" means nothing (except maybe to TP-Link).

802.11ac devices also work with 802.11n and 802.11g. 802.11n devices also work with 802.11g. (And I'm not going to talk about older specifications.)
 

travel-guy

Chris
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Thank you Terry, that makes some sense, but still don't understand fully.
The BT tech I was using were all powerline, so never had to think about it.

Like I say had to swap all the hotspot devices as they seemed to be faulty. There were 3 in total 2 regular and a mini. I was able to do a direct swap of the mini for same model in the 600 series. (The 600 ref to mps its capable of. That bit I get) but I had the 2 Reg devices swapped for the TP-link range extenders.

In theory it's simple.

The TP-Links are coupled to the router directly (installed using wps button). Plug them in, press the button when you should, press the button on router. Bibbidi bobbidi boo they're working.

The powerline adapters (of which there are 5. 2 x reg with integrated plug socket, 2 x mini and a single wifi mini hotspot) are installed by plugging 1 in next to the router, connect both (router and adapter) using an Ethernet cable. This is your base unit.
Now plug the other devices as and where you need them around the house. Press the link button for 1 sec on one of the devices then within 2 mins press link button on base unit for 1 sec. hey presto that one is ready to go. repeat process with each of the other 1 by 1, Bibbidi bobbidi boo that should be them all working.

But they don't.
and I don't get why.

I know the repeaters don't join up on the cable network created by powerline devices when doing their bit. The repeaters take what they need for their job via the WIFI itself. Logically to me (please remember I'm a beginner so if I'm wrong forgive the ignorance) things should be working all fine. But they don't.
Do repeaters disrupt the powerline network when they are plugged in? Does it somehow stop the connection of the powerline adapter if plugged in a socked that's on the same cable network. If they shouldn't be conflicting, obviously the problem is elsewhere, in which... do you have any ideas what it could be.
Please any help you got would be gratefully received.
Thank you.
 

TerryNet

Terry
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Theoretically powerline adapters are not impacted by anything else plugged into the electrical system. I doubt that since whether powerline adapters work well, OK, or not at all depends on the wiring and the quality of the electrical system with nothing else plugged in.

You must have a huge house to need all those devices! The best I can do is offer some general troubleshooting advice. Unplug all your repeaters and powerline devices except for the main (router connected) one. Then start adding powerline adapters, testing each before adding the next one. Then begin adding your Repeaters one at a time, testing each and the powerline adapters before adding the next Repeater. That should narrow the problem(s) sufficient to identify exactly, and hopefully fix.
 
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