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Asrock 775 dual-vsta - good board??

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Bigolac, Jan 26, 2007.

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  1. Bigolac

    Bigolac Thread Starter

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    Ok, here's the deal:

    I saw this board at Newegg, and was wondering if anyone else had had experience with it:

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E16813157092

    I can buy one of the newer dual-core procs and still use my ol ddr ram and agp? And it's under $60?!?!

    This seems to good to be true - I seem to remember having an old motherboard with a VIA chipset that was atrocious.

    Still, for the price, it seems like it could do the job..... Maybe get a pentium d 805 with a 20x multiplier and overclock a bit....

    Let me know your thoughts...
     
  2. crjdriver

    crjdriver Moderator

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    IMO you are wasting your money.

    First of all asrock boards are designed by asus however the actual mfg is done by ecs. ECS is noted for poor quality control, cheap products, etc. If asus will not even put their name on the board, that should tell you about the quality.

    Next if you are going to use an intel cpu, the only chipset to use is an intel chipset. If you use sis, via, etc you are just asking for problems.

    Save your money and buy quality parts; you will be much happier in the long run.
     
  3. telegramsam

    telegramsam

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    Via + Intel = bad news
     
  4. Compiler

    Compiler

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    Actually... thats quite wrong.

    Many people have been having problems with the P965 chipset because most board manufactures have added a JMicron IDE controller. This is causing all sorts of problems with performance and reliablity - many have fixed the problems with BIOS of configuration recommendations to reduce conflicts.

    Here: http://www.anandtech.com/mb/showdoc.aspx?i=2914

    Biostar and a few others have used the VIA IDE controller with the 965chipset do NOT HAVE such problems. And of course, the Nforce4 / 5 and 6 are not having these issues and their performance and feature set equals or exeeds that of intels. If you want PCIe 16x16 - it won't be with an intel chipset.

    Bigolac - look at other boards for $10~20 more, it'll be worth it. Look at Gigabyte, ASUS and MSI and even BIOSTAR.... but for AGP/DDR-400 - you're limited to biostar and other low-end models.

    The C2Duo CPU would be best in a modern board - such as an Nforce5 board but they are about $105 and up. Nforce 4 boards start at $80.
     
  5. brite750

    brite750

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    what stuff do you have currently that you want to reuse? and why are you going to a new MB, whats wrong with the old one?
    Asrock has some what of a tainted rep on this site as you can see, Ive used Via MB all along with AMD processors never had a problem, with intel? youre on your own.
     
  6. brite750

    brite750

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    I would go with Biostar wayyyyyy before I'd buy an Asrock
     
  7. brite750

    brite750

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    also keep in mind overclocking on cheap parts is probably asking for a kick in the crotch, from what ive heard you need higher-end products, ram, MB's, cooling.
     
  8. Bigolac

    Bigolac Thread Starter

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    I guess my main thought with this board was its versatility - I still have a nice agp card (raedon x850 pro) which I don't want to get rid of.

    I also have some nice dual channel 184-pin ram that isn't ddr2 - which is what I would need for any of the other boards that support a dual-processor intel cpu.

    I also see it as somewhat of a challenge - for someone cheap like me, of course - to marry some older technology to newer stuff...

    I appreciate everyone's input - maybe Asrock isn't the only company to produce such a board.

    Bigolac
     
  9. crjdriver

    crjdriver Moderator

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    You only have problems when you try and get hardware to do something it was not designed to do. The 965 chipset does not natively support ide SO board mfg have "added" a controller. In addition most problems I have seen are related to using memory that does not meet the specs for the board.

    In short if you want an intel system to be stable and reliable, use an intel chipset. Can you get slightly better performance from say an nvidia chipset? Probably; at the expense of stability. It really comes down to what do you want the system to do; run stable or do you want to be adjusting it all the time? For this reason I always recommend an intel chipset for an intel cpu.
     
  10. telegramsam

    telegramsam

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    You are right about the 965 chipset, there is a third party IDE controller. My point is that with the Via chipsets, with their cheap construction and spotty reliability, make boards that have short lifespans and give problems that are nearly impossible to diagnose. That's just been my experience with them.

    Anymore, the P965 and all SATA seems to make a lot of sense, but when re-using parts it doesn't.
     
  11. Compiler

    Compiler

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    1 - While the x850Pro is a fine card - it is holding you back from an upgrade path. When I upgrade, my #1PC becomes my #2PC - the old #2 gets sold to help buy parts for new #1.
    There are games coming out that far exceed the abilities of the X850 - and when you want to upgrade your card (lets say 6~9 months from now) your choices maybe more limited than they are now. ATI makes the FASTEST AGP cards on the market... which won't work on the fastest systms.

    2 - Core2Duo CPUs were not designed with DDR-1 in mind. intel went to DDR2 a year before C2D came out. Fastest Here is a review on an ASrock DDR1 mobo.
    http://anandtech.com/mb/showdoc.aspx?i=2810&p=3 -

    one thing they do NOT hit on is how the DDR1 compares to DDR2 on a native DDR2 mobo. ie: The performance of RAM (DDR400 / DDR2 533 / DDR2 667) is not much differnce - but it is likely that DDR2-667 is actually performing at DDR400 speed. When compariion DDR2 533 / 667 & 800Mhz, there is a bit of a performance increase with C2D CPUs.

    Here is the BIOSTAR which I'd take over a ASROCK anyday.
    http://www.anandtech.com/mb/showdoc.aspx?i=2724

    With this review - with either DDR1 or DDR2, its among the slowest thing out there. Such as 85fps vs 105fps. The PCIe slot, while having an 16x slot - is actually only 4x performance.... and so a PCIe Video card performs a bit lower than an AGP card of same type. Using the audio on such board (again, old tech) reduces gameplay by another 10~20fps.

    3 - If you want to USE your AGP card and DDR1 RAM, I recommend an Nforce3 board - but they are very hard to come by as they are quite old and maybe not work with dual core AMD CPUs.

    4 - With myself (and some others here I think) who have experince with HYBRID boards - they are NOT WORTH IT. You get instability, performance loss and add up the time lost with reboots, lost data and slower performance - they are rarely worth it.

    It was the same in the OLD ISA/VESA/PCI hybrid boards (garbage) or the CPU socket converters (Converts Pentium to fit a 486 board for example, or a 486 into a 386 mobo etc) and the most public was the stupid intel MCH used to convert SD-RAM to an RD-RAM controller.

    You're looking at a mess on your hands. Save some money and Sell what you have and buy what you can get.

    About the cheapest upgrade I think possible is an Nforce4 board ($50 ASUS or MSI with VIA chipset - sometimes less) pop in a $150 AMD X2 3800 and new PCIe video card $200 = $400~425


    Many techs don't want the cheap stuff - spending hours trouble shooting junk which needs to be replaced is a waste of time and money, not a challenge.
    ie: The $60 wasted to replace with another $80~100 part that should have been bought the first time.
     
  12. Compiler

    Compiler

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    Thats the point, intel screwed up dropping IDE before the industry was ready (which is sad) but that is partly M$ fault with how XP(non SP versions) and older operatings systems that don't know how to talk to SATA controllers. The choices of SATA opticals is still very limited. PS: when XP was designed, it should have been designed to ASK for drivers from USB or optical media... not a stupid floppy drive.

    Hmmm... most people don't seem to have a problem with Nvidia chipsets. As you said "probably" - thats not a fact. And as proved with the Jmicron and memory issues - that kind of tosses the "intel knows best" out the window. If the Nforce 5/6 series boards were unstable - nobody would buy them, they would be regulated to econo boards... for which VIA and SIS still make Northbridges for and work quite well... the reasons THEY tend to fail is that the other parts of the boards are using really cheap parts.
     
  13. Compiler

    Compiler

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    TO: telegramsam

    VIA has made very good chipsets. They don't control the quality of the boards they are used on (same as intel / nvidia or ATI/AMD)

    VIA became rather important when Intel screwed up the 825chipset for P3 CPUs. That mess caused a severe shortage of motherboards with intel chipsets, but VIA's chipset was available and gave them crediblity. VIA was also the best AMD chipset, especially with KT133A Chipset and above. It wasn't until nForce2 that Nvidia kicked VIA in the nuts and haven't stopped. But even today, the VIA chipsets sell pretty well for both AMD and Intel - but they gave up competing with Nvidia/Intel/ATI in pure performance and name recongnition... so those chipsets are used in fairly junky boards (PC Chips - ECS - ASrock - Jetway), but ASUS,Gigabyte and MSI still uses VIA for the low-end boards ($45~70)

    Which by the way, if the poster is SOLD on keeping his parts and an Intel CPU - some AGP/DDR1 boards will work with PentiumD chips. But the only ones that do: PentiumD/AGP/DDR400 seems to be PCCHIPs - which is the WORTH thing to subject a person to.
     
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