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Asus P5K-E / WiFi-AP motherboard

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by ShiVER, Mar 6, 2008.

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  1. ShiVER

    ShiVER Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2006
    Messages:
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    So it's time to overhaul my comp ( 3Ghz processor / Asus motherboard / SDRAM ). Today at Fry's I will buy a new processor, motherboard, DDR2 RAM, and a new ATI graphics card. These new parts as well as my old comp will then travel to a professional for assembly.

    Asus P5K-E / WiFi-AP motherboard
    http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/493

    Intel Core2Quad Q6600 Bx processor

    TWIN2X4096-6400C5DHX DDR2 Ram

    Because I am hardware illiterate, my question is simply: Is this a solid base for a new computer? When I bring these parts to the professional, will he have any problems assembling these three components? I don't want to have him tell me that I must make another trip to Fry's to buy the right parts. Is Dual Core better for this motherboard instead of Quad Core?

    As for the accessories ( mouse, modem, sound card, drives ), please ignore them for now.

    Finally, I understand that I must also buy a powerbox with some kind of rails for my new PCI-Express graphics card?
     
  2. Jones

    Jones

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2005
    Messages:
    2,291
    Solid base: Yes. That is a very nice motherboard.

    Trouble with assembly: No. Everything you've chosen so far is 100% compatible.

    Dual-core better: Not necessarily. There aren't many applications that take advantage of all 4 cores, so if you can find a better price on a dual-core, you might want to consider it. Otherwise the quad-core is a good choice.

    Powerbox: The item you're referring to is called a power supply, or PSU for short. The 'rails' refer to the amount of power capable of being distributed at each voltage type used by the computer.

    Here's a good example of a nice PSU at a respectable price that is more than powerful enough for most needs:
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817371015
     
  3. ShiVER

    ShiVER Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2006
    Messages:
    67
    Thank you for your quick reply.

    You know, now I am considering a dual core because someones has now told me this:

    Now, do you really need a quad core? A fast dual core will do you better in my opinion. Nothing, other than maybe the [email protected] SMP client, will utilize all 4 cores. There is not much that reeeaaally takes advantage of 2, but more and more newer apps will. Also, the current quads are not true quads. They are 2 dual cores glued together.

    Consider the E6750, or 6850.


    As for the 'rails' question: I think I am already am using rails, because my ATI X1650 graphics card is currently drawing power from one of the cords of the powerbox. I thought that perhaps there might be new technology regarding power boxes and graphics cards.
     
  4. Jones

    Jones

    Joined:
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    Messages:
    2,291
    I agree with the 'other person'. For all intents and purposes, a dual-core processor will give you a ton of power. You won't be at any disadvantage with a quad-core, but it's really not 'necessary' at this point.

    I should have been more clear on the PSU thing.

    PSU's have a set number of watts that are available to be distributed throughout your PC. They distribute this power through channels or 'rails' designed to provide power at different voltages based on the needs of different components. These 'rails' are built into the guts of the PSU, and don't really have anything to do with the cords coming out the box to the various components.

    Each PSU will have a 5volt rail, a 3.3volt rail, and a 12volt rail. Each rail will have a certain number of amps on it. Better PSU's will have more amps available on the 12volt rail in order to run more power hungry hardware. Cheaper PSU's will have fewer amps on the 12volt rail. Sometimes PSU's will have 2, 3 or 4 different 12volt rails in order to provide power in a more stable manner to more powerful systems.

    The 12volt rail is where heavy power usage components will draw their power, like your graphics card.

    The fact that you have a cord plugged into your card really doesn't have to do with the 12volt rail. It just means that the card needs more power than can be provided through the motherboard connector.

    Basically, you'll want to look at the sticker on the side of the PSU. It will tell you the total wattage available, number of 12volt rails, and the amps on each rail.

    These numbers, along with the brand name, are what usually determines the quality of a PSU.
     
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