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Attaching single band external antenna to dual band wi-fi router.

Discussion in 'Networking' started by kn4ova, Feb 27, 2014.

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  1. kn4ova

    kn4ova Thread Starter

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    Will I damage the RF output circuit of a dual band wi-fi router if I attach an antenna that is only designed for the 2.4 gHz? band?
     
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  3. jhayz

    jhayz

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  4. kn4ova

    kn4ova Thread Starter

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    Thank you. I am a retired radio broadcasting engineer and have been an active ham radio operator since 1957, so I am familiar with most of the information about antennas in the link you sent. - I should explain what I'm trying to do - I have a guest house located about 275' from my home. I want to provide guest wi-fi service to that house from a router in my home. I am only interested in getting a useable 2.4 gHz low-band signal to/from the guest house, not high-band. I think a very high gain antenna might do the job. It is clear line of sight. I might have to use a range extender at the guest house to get full coverage inside. - I have a router with three removable antennas on order. I am currently serving my small home with an old router with a single antenna, so I think I could spare one of three antenna ports in order to aim a signal toward the guest house. - My question had to do with my concern about the fact that a low-band antenna will present a very serious impedance mismatch to the high-band signal from a modern dual band wireless router. - Maybe there is a better way to achieve srevice to the guest house than what I have in mind. I'd welcome suggestions.
     
  5. jhayz

    jhayz

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    It's a hit or miss with range extenders sometimes because its imaginary up to this point on the obstruction going to the frequency range. But a more sustainable wifi connection would be more likely creating another wireless access point which means using an additional router as it is wired to your main router.
     
  6. Elvandil

    Elvandil

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    If the electric service for the guesthouse comes from yours, there is "ethernet over power". I use it throughout my house. But it works best on the same side of 3-phase service, though they claim it doesn't matter.
     
  7. DaveBurnett

    DaveBurnett Account Closed

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    Have you tried a directional dish antenna?
    I made up a "pringle can" one just for fun. It worked well to a house 100 yards away with a similar antenna.

    We lined them up at night with a laser pointer.
     
  8. kn4ova

    kn4ova Thread Starter

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    I need to provide wi-fi service throughout the guest house.
     
  9. kn4ova

    kn4ova Thread Starter

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    This probably would not work in my case. The houses are NOT fed by the same transformer.
     
  10. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor

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    I personally haven't set up this topology, but I would if I were faced with the same issue you are. The product I would use would allow a mesh network topology. Aruba Networks has APs which support this. What you would do is have one AP which acts as the wired gateway. The AP would be the model which requires external antennas. You would then use a directional antenna for the 5GHz radio. If you want local coverage off the same AP, you would install an omnidirectional on the 2.4GHz radio. On the other end where you're looking to extend the network, you would use the same model AP and use a directional on the 5GHz and a omnidirectional on the 2.4GHz radio. This to me is the ONLY way to do this with proper operation and acceptable performance.

    The use of the 5 GHz radio is because there is less interference from ambient RF noise. The other reason why it is done this way is because of the operational principles of extending a network wirelessly. You need a backbone connection that is active all the time. You can't have the same 2.4GHz radio be your backbone and service wireless clients...at least not do it well.

    The APs I would use from Aruba are the IAP 105 or IAP 135. Also keep in mind, your daily performance will depend on physical environmental conditions as well such as if there is snow or rain.

    ETA: The wireless clients connecting to these APs would only be able to operate over 2.4 GHz.
     
  11. kn4ova

    kn4ova Thread Starter

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    Thanks for taking time to reply. I'll look into this.
     
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