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Backup Options

Discussion in 'All Other Software' started by BML, May 11, 2012.

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  1. BML

    BML Thread Starter

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    I'm currently using Carbonite for my backup. I have a total of 210gb right now, which will slowly increase. I like the way Carbonite keeps it up to date, removing files as I delete them and re-saving files that I change. But the problem is, they throttle your service if you have more than 200gb. My upload speeds are very slow. It takes about a day and half for 1gb. I am really disappointed in that I pay for this service which is "unlimited" and my speed is reduced simply because I have a lot.

    What other options are there? I'm paying $54/year for this. I looked at Mozy, but that is over $200! Most of my stuff is digital high-res pictures that I shoot and I cannot afford to lose them with the time and effort I put into it. If I get a external h/d, there's the chance it could be stolen during a break-in which cannot happen with Carbonite. Or if my place is damaged in fire, tornado, etc. Storing a h/d off-site means I cannot continuously update my backup. Carbonite says that 98% of its users store less than 200gb so I guess I am the 2% :D but how do photographers back up their difficult-to-reproduce works? Any other suggestions or options?
     
  2. TheShooter93

    TheShooter93 Malware Specialist

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    Personally, I hate the idea of online backups.

    Keeping 2 internal harddrives in a RAID 1 configuration, or even multiple external harddrives is the way I go. Since you're worried about the security of these in natural disasters and break-ins, you could purchase a fire-proof safe and seal the harddrive(s) in waterproof bags. As for break-ins, there are many options to make sure the safe stays secure.

    If you keep these connected continuously, software can update them automatically, or you could manually perform backups whenever you want.
     
  3. DoubleHelix

    DoubleHelix Banned

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    If you step back and look at the situation objectively, you'll see you're getting a ridiculous amount of data and service for very little money. 200+GB is a lot of data. You should consider yourself very lucky that you don't have a data cap from your ISP that prevents that kind of transfer. The highest cap I've seen in the US is Comcast at 250GB.

    "Unlimited" is a buzz word, but in this case you are actually getting unlimited backup. It's just that the speed is throttled. No company could afford to offer blazingly fast speeds for trillions of terabytes of data for every person in the world.

    Professional photographers use services like Smug Mug to back up their photos online. Yes, you have to pay. You have to decide how much your data is worth.
     
  4. BML

    BML Thread Starter

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    Yeah, I am getting a lot of bang for the $54.... I didn't upload 210gb all at once. It was probably 150gb back when I did it, slowly adding to it. If I go with any other service, I'll end up paying much more. SmugMug Vault is about $25/month.

    I like the external h/d option but if there's a h/d sitting next to the computer and say the place burns down, then both are toast.
     
  5. fairnooks

    fairnooks Banned

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    Option C subcategory B; external drive backup at a remote location, truly unlimited (depends on how many drives you supply), needs to be a system on the other end to communicate with and that is left on all the time.

    In other words if you have a trusted friend, family member, or secure workplace, all at a remote but maybe not to remote location (so you can retrieve the backups in a fairly timely manner if needed), you can roll your own off-site backup to your own external (or internal) drive. The program you would need is Google's Gbridge and set up what are called SecureShares. To see and browse the data at the remote site you would set up SecureShare for that drive as well but not actually share it unless you wanted it to synchronize the backups.

    I currently backup about 1.2 terabytes at a remote location, only cost was the $80 2TB drive (tells you how long ago that was, though I've seen them for $110 again now so they're coming back down) I supplied to a trusted friend. Haven't had a single problem with it to date, which is notable since storms have cut electricity and burned out modems and routers at both locations and when all is back up and running, Gbridge just picks up right where is left off. If the drive last for 5 years, that will be a cost of $16 a year for up to 2 TBs of backup.
     
  6. BML

    BML Thread Starter

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    thats an interesting option..
     
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