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Backup Software (EaseUS/Windows Backup)

Discussion in 'All Other Software' started by Spade64, May 1, 2012.

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  1. Spade64

    Spade64 Thread Starter

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    I just bought a USB 3.0 3 TB external drive for making backups. After some searching, I decided to use EaseUS Todo Backup because CNET rated it highly. I plugged the drive into a 3.0 port and did a backup. It was a file backup, not an image backup, but it still puts everything in one file (.PBD) and then apparently modifies Windows Explorer to be able to browse the file. Windows Backup (the one that comes on Windows 7) seems to work similarly, though you need to use a wizard to restore things. The backup took twice as much space as my data takes up on my internal hard drive. Also, it took 8 and a half hours, which I calculated to be 20 MB/s. So my questions are:

    1. Why doesn't it just put things in the drive in a normal folder/file structure?
    2. Why did it take up twice as much space?
    3. Why did a USB 3.0 backup go so slowly? (Maybe it has something to do with the fact that it took up twice as much space, but that's still slow considering I've gotten speeds of 75 MB/s, and I do realize transferring a lot of small files will take longer.)
    4. Am I just better off with using Windows Backup (or is restoring a pain with the wizard)?

    Thanks for any advise!
     
  2. Elvandil

    Elvandil

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    I'd go with Macrium for free and Acronis for pay. The images are roughly 60% of the used space (compressed and things like page file left out). I haven't used Easeus, but that doesn't sound like it worked as it should.

    Free drive backup software (imaging, cloning, and archiving - backups can be created on a second hard drive, internal or external, or on DVD's, or BluRay disks. One BluRay disk will hold most peoples' entire system drive's backup at 25 GB's using compressed images, 50 GB's double-layer):

    Paragon Backup & Recovery 2012 (Recovery boot CD or USB key)
    Macrium Reflect (Free)
    O&O Disk Image Express or (mirror)
    Easeus Todo Backup
    Acronis True Image For WD (reduced, free version for WD drives - cloning and imaging)
    Acronis True Image For Seagate (DiscWizard) (reduced, free version for Seagate drives - cloning and imaging)
    ODIN (open-source)
    Redo Backup & Recovery (Boot CD)
    Clonezilla Live (A bootable CD of Debian with Clonezilla.)
    Drive Image XML
    PING (Partimage is not Ghost) (Boot CD with option Clam Antivirus)
    Partition Saving
    Clonezilla
    Passmark OSFClone (Bootable, cloning only)
    ImageX and GImageX (Geekware. Small images due to "single instancing" and allows partial, selected restore of image parts. Used by Microsoft to apply disk image to drive during "installation" of Windows 7.)

    There are also many commercial products with more features.

    The reason it is all in one file is because a file system would be needed to make it navigable, and it is supposed to be compressed in that smaller file.
     
  3. fairnooks

    fairnooks Banned

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    It sounds like EaseUS ToDo is able to "mount" the pbd file virtually as if it were another drive/partition, that's good to be able to spot check verify some files and probably selectively recover files instead of having to restore the whole thing to get one or two files back.

    Windows backup is pretty basic...its better than nothing, and I think the reason its taking up so much room is you probably have the settings at default so it makes a file backup and also an image backup.
     
  4. Spade64

    Spade64 Thread Starter

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    I definitely want to use freeware. I have used Macrium before. Is there something these have that Windows Backup does not (that I would actually use, considering my requirements are that it is easy to use, makes file and image backups, and is easy to restore individual or multiple files, or entire drives)?

    And I didn't make an image backup. All there is on the drive is the .PBD file. I was going to make an image after the file backup.
     
  5. Elvandil

    Elvandil

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    There is no need to make any file backup if you are making an image. You can mount the image and get any files from that (which Windows backup can't do). The only reason to have a file backup is if you are backing up files more often than the system, but even then, an incremental backup of the whole system takes a few minutes and will include any new or changed files. I make 6 Acronis backups a day, so no file is very old before it has been included in an image. I have 20 or so images going all the way back a month that takes around 250 GB's on my external (the system has about 125 GB's of data). Acronis deletes the ones I've specified to get rid of after a specific time, so I have one very recent, one a few days old, and then more that are older.

    I'm also not sure if Windows backup can restore to different sized drives or partitions if yours should fail.
     
  6. Spade64

    Spade64 Thread Starter

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    Well my thinking was that I'd make an image and then file backups that are much smaller to save time. Does an incremental disc image backup work by making one full backup and then making a new image by making a copy of that image and replacing files with new versions? Because then it would take up multiples of 670 GB (the size of my OS drive) which seems like it would make it take a long time to back up, as well as eat up all my drive space. What I would want is one full image backup as well as a file backup that would just have files that were updated be replaced, so I only have one backup of each. I really wouldn't make frequent image backups (I don't care about restoring my system to its most recent state as long as I get my data back, and initially I'm even restoring the system to factory settings because I've been having frequent blue screen problems).

    So is this possible, or do backups just not work this way?

    Edit: I just checked Macrium's website and it looks like the free version doesn't have "File and Folder Backup". So I'm not inclined to use it.
     
  7. Elvandil

    Elvandil

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    Incremental only saves changes since last backup. You start with a full, and each incremental then saves the changes since the first. You need the full and all the incrementals to recover the last backup, but you have all of them to choose from.

    With a differential, usually larger, you only need the original full and the last differential to recover the last backup. It can save space because you can delete all the other differentials, where with incrementals, you need them all. I prefer incrementals since I have more dates to recover to.

    An incremental of my system in the AM takes about 3 minutes. A bit more if you use VSS.

    My Acronis Backup & Recover has several schedule templates that you can use if you want. I chose the Grandfather-Father-Son schedule and made some changes to it. It makes sure you have plenty of backups in minimal space.
     
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