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Solved Beating key loggers

Discussion in 'General Security' started by bilnrobn, Jan 1, 2019.

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  1. bilnrobn

    bilnrobn Thread Starter

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    Can copy/pasting in passwords from an independent list defeat keylogging attempts? (It certainly makes entering long and complex passwords easy, but does it help security wise?
     
  2. dvk01

    dvk01 Moderator Malware Specialist

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    no!
    Almost all modern keylogging or remote access trojan software intercepts & reads what is sent over the internet, not what your keyboard types.

    In the "bad" old days, keyloggers read what you typed adn using an onscreen keyboard & mouse or pasting in a password etc would stop a high % of them reading the entries. That no longer applies
     
  3. bilnrobn

    bilnrobn Thread Starter

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    Thanks dvk, so it follows then that long complicated passwords are also a waste of time? On security-critical sites like my bank I use alpha/numeric/symbol passwords passwords up to 43 digits long. The copy/paste entry makes it very quick to enter while getting it accurate every time, but now I'm wondering if long passwords are any better than short ones? Is this the case?

    Thanks for the link; I'll check it out to see if I can make use of any of the suggestions.
     
  4. dvk01

    dvk01 Moderator Malware Specialist

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    Oh yes, long & complicated passwords are much better & safer. The chances of a keylogger getting on the computer are low, if you are sensible. The chances of somebody reading a password over your shoulder or compromising a website and stealing the hash of the password are much higher. The longer & more complicated the password, the less chance of it being discovered & used. reversing a hash on a 12 digit or higher password or brute forcing it is extremely difficult & time consuming. If you use a 43 digit password the chance of brute force is just about 0. It would take millions of years of computer time to do it
     
  5. bilnrobn

    bilnrobn Thread Starter

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    Thanks dvk, that helps a lot. Thanks also for the Security Advice link. I've just spent a couple of hours working through it. good stuff in there.
     
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