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Best Linux OS?

Discussion in 'Linux and Unix' started by Metys, Oct 11, 2003.

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  1. Metys

    Metys Thread Starter

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    im a n00b to linux so im just looking for a distribution thats pretty easy to use but runs well.

    i really dont know anything about what i should look for in an os for linux so somebody who has some knowledge help me plz!


    thanx in advance,

    -metys
     
  2. LinuxGold

    LinuxGold

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    Linux distributions came in different flavors depending on your character, knowing you're new to linux:

    -Looking for fast way to install, easy upgrade and configurability, use Redhat

    -Looking for highly detailed, easy install, easy upgrade and configurability, use Debian.

    -Looking for highly detailed, (boot camp style to REALLY learn how linux core works) auto/manual install option, manual or auto upgrade and manual or auto configurability, use Slackware

    Personally, I would recommend to learn shell scripting, learn how /etc directory works on each file by file, by then you're done learning, you will learn how linux works rather quickly and you will be up and running in making a better decision on which distribution is right for you.
     
  3. Whiteskin

    Whiteskin

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    I agree with LinuxGold. It mainly depends on how you like to work with it. If you like a good packaging system, go with Debian. If you like compiling from source go with gentoo (not for newbs!!!!!) if you want to go from source then i wouldnt actually go with linux, i'd actually go with freebsd, because it has the ports system, and a package managment that is ahead of everything with the exeption of debian.
     
  4. Metys

    Metys Thread Starter

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    perhaps ill try slackware... sounds like its what i need to learn how it works. thanx again fella's
     
  5. Whiteskin

    Whiteskin

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    And Remember.... man pages are your best friends (besides us of course)
     
  6. ReNxWar

    ReNxWar

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    Mandrake is geared more towards everyday users. I used it for alittle while and it seemed very user friendly.
     
  7. codejockey

    codejockey

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    Lots of good thoughts from previous posters. However, as a die-hard Slackware user, I have to recommend against Slackware for a first-time installation. Slackware aims to be the most 'Unix-like" distribution (whatever that means); my rough translation is that it provides many of the user-hostile features of Unix: cryptic configuration files, arcane command syntax, plenty of terminal-mode/non-GUI/command-line interaction and a subtle "less is more" attitude. True, all of these features are available in other distributions :))), but usually not quite as readily as in Slackware.

    If you know you want to learn about what's really happening underneath all of the pretty screen displays and dialog boxes, Slackware is a fine choice. But understand: you are driving a stick-shift here, not an automatic.

    Hope this helps.
     
  8. AbvAvgUser

    AbvAvgUser

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    I use RedHat 9. Simpley because its the most popular version and therefore there are many books available that are specifically written for RedHat. No oher version has so many specifically written books.
     
  9. tgm

    tgm

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    Here is another thing to keep in mind. You might some day want to load some third party software on your machine. The fact of the matter is that most third party products support RedHat. Not that RedHat is any better Linux; just that it is probably the most popular and has very good support (corporate users demand this). Another warning: many of the third party vendors do not immediately support the latest Linux version. It seems somewhat typical that most of them are one level back for 6 months or so. So for example, these days the current RedHat version is 9; so you will find that most vendors are supporting version 8 instead. The drawback to installing a version level back is all the updates that need to be installed too. In the case of RedHat it means that you really need to learn the rpm software install process as a high priority item on your study list.
     
  10. LinuxGold

    LinuxGold

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    Hmm... here's another thing, issue this command and analyze:

    (If you got the world of time to yourself)

    cd /usr/bin
    for i in * ; do man $i ; done


    (If you got limited time)

    cd /usr/bin
    ls
    (pick a utility then issue this command)
    man <utilityname>

    After learning all those utilities, you will be able to use commandline fluently.

    BTW, as far as freebsd and linux in comparison are concerned, they're good on their thing. =)
     
  11. 8inchFloppy

    8inchFloppy

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    other distros to try (not so popular, but rather functional) - ELX Linux BizDesktop (much like Windoze) SOTL Linux (Server Optimised), Redhat I found rather less intuitive and configurable than Mandrake. For a full featured and scalable install I would go MDK, RH, or for ease of use - one of the many smaller distros. Check out linux.org for a list.
     
  12. AbvAvgUser

    AbvAvgUser

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    Yahoo has a messenger clone written for RedHat upto the latest version 9. This is just an example. Almost all third party softwares are available for RedHat. There are very few other versions supported. For a newbie like me, RedHat is the most obvious choice.
     
  13. kmk740

    kmk740

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    Aug 25, 2003
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    I'm a new user to Linux and I am running Redhat 9. I must say that I am pleasantly surprised at how many third party developers there are creating Redhat compatible software. That being said, the user that noted the issue of keeping third party software up to date with the current versions of Redhat is right on target. Case in point, the dns2go client: While it is currently running on my Redhat 9 system, it's latest client version is designed for Redhat 8.

    Another thing to keep in mind while selecting your Linux OS: What will it's primary use be? If you simply want to delve into the world of Linux I say try as many of the OS's that you can. Toy around with one for a month and then install a different OS and see how it compares. If you do intend on choosing and actually using a platform for a long period of time I suggest you go with Redhat...but my opinion is skewwed being that Redhat is the only one I've tinkered with...but I intend on using for awhile and so far it does exactly what I need it to!
     
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