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Best to Worst Hardware

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by mooml, Jun 24, 2005.

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  1. mooml

    mooml Thread Starter

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    I'm considering buillding a new computer for my family. I know how to put a computer together, but i don't know the best things for my computer. For example.. i was looking at a Pentium 4 3.0 GHz Processor and i also saw a Pentium 4 3.8 GHz Processor. My guess is that the 3.8 GHz is better, but i don't know why it's better. What will .8 extra GHz do for my computer? I know whats better... but i dont know why.

    Another example... I'm looking at a Pentium 4 3.2 GHz Processor and i'm also looking at an Athlon AMD 64 2.6 GHz Processor. The AMD is more expensive but is it better? This is all extremely confusing to me. Now i don't even know what's better.

    I don't expect anyone here to tell me everything i need to know about how to distinguish whats better and why one thing is better than another... but do any of you know where i can learn about this? Possibly a website or maybe a book. Thanks for reading.
     
  2. Dick1038

    Dick1038

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    Seeing that you are a beginner, I suggest that you don't attempt such a complicated project without a helpful book. You might try Amazon.com books. In any case, you will be getting a mess of headaches before you are through.

    The high ghz cpu's get really hot, so care must be taken to insure adequate cooling.

    You really don't save any money by putting together you own machine from scratch. Manufactuers by the components dirt cheap and use cheap labor to assemble them.

    Then there's the cost of the software. You will need a copy of Windows plus all of the other softwre you need.
     
  3. mooml

    mooml Thread Starter

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    Although it may seem odd.. i've put together a list of parts i'de like for a "dream computer" by using eBay. I've got everything i need to put together a computer right now and the cost came up to $1800. Then i looked for a computer very similar to the one i "put together" on eBay. I found one for $1800 and the only thing better was it's P4 3.4 GHz Processor compared to my P4 3.2 GHz. It didn't have any software with it, no monitor, and no keyboard or mouse. So i can save money putting it together myself. In my list, i have down many cooling fans and have water cooling considered. My problem isn't just processors either. I don't really know what any other hardware's specifications tell me either. I realize i am a beginner and i thank you for your advice. I can imagine how frustrating it will be but i have to start somewhere. I've put together computers before, but i never chose the hardware that was going into it. Also, i know where to get books and i know where websites are, but i don't know which websites and books are helpful. Again thank you very much for replying and giving your personal advice... but i feel i will learn the most if i do this.
     
  4. rockinmale

    rockinmale

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    Here's my humble two cents.....

    In my opinion, i would rather build a new system than buy a proprietary system with no upgradability. Dick1038 is right in the long run building a new system will set you back more on cost but, you have more options of upgradability. Bascially your first time building it costs you the most. Since you dont have any hardware/software. When you decide to upgrade you can carry over hardware/software from this system into your new box. I certainly wont be the first one to tell you. It's the software that raises the intial cost of the pc. Where as buying a proprietary system the software is included. Although on another note pc manufacturers (HP, DELL, ETC) use cheaper parts than if you were to build it yourself. So if you build it yourself you will spend more but, you will be buying better quality parts.

    I wouldnt let that last post discourage you from wanting to build your own system. We all go through the learning curve to learn something new. If you can put a computer together like you stated that's the easy part. When you buy quality parts your chances of running into problems is less. Of course things do happen and you will run into problems whether its software or hardware. Dont forget you got the help from this board to get you through it.

    Im sure myself and anyone else on this board would be happy to help you decide on what (QUALITY)(I have to stress that)hardware to buy.

    Before we can actually help you we need you to answer a few question?
    How much is your budget?
    Will you need to include a monitor in your budget? If so would that be a crt or a flat panel? Let's not forget about size as well.
    Of course most importantly what are your primary uses on the pc? Based on your use, we can suggest hardware to give you the best bang for buck and still fit in your budget.

    To answer your question about the pentium (4) 3ghz next to the amd64 2.6ghz. The amd will outrun the 3ghz since its a faster cpu. That's why the cost is much greater. To explain this in a simple way. Amd and intel have their own naming system when it comes to cpu speed. If anyone else wants to explain this is more detail. Please be my guest.

    That's all i got for now!
    TC
    rockinmale:cool:
     
  5. Dick1038

    Dick1038

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    I agree, rockinmale, such a system would be easily upgradable, but at more cost.
     
  6. techno_lust

    techno_lust

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    80 dollars =really good case
    100 dollars = really good power supply
    50 dollars =really good cpu heatsink fan
    200 dollars for full copy of windows
    80 dollars for decent harddrive
    50 dollars for decent cd-rw
    100 dollars for a gig of ram
    80 dollars for a video card but 200 or more for good gaming
    30 dollars for a couple of case fans
    25 dollars for a floppy drive
    100 dollars for decent motherboard
    200 dollars for a decent CPU.

    1,095 dollars for a decent system
     
  7. techno_lust

    techno_lust

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    look at my sig below. I put all that together with a full paid for copy of windows XP for 1300 bucks and it has a very large case and very good power supply and very nice video card and more ram than I really need. I bought it all from newegg online except the copy of windows which I bought at officemax.

    This system is fast, stable and upgradeable and I do not have anything overclocked
     
  8. techno_lust

    techno_lust

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    I think the only real way you can build your own system as cheap as the big boys like HP, Compaq and Gateway is to buy second hand hardware and run a bootleg copy of windows because as has already been said, the big manufacturers use very cheap parts and very cheap labor. The OEM version of the operating system they install on those machines only cost's them about 50 bucks.
     
  9. DCM1519

    DCM1519

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    I made up a similar list a few years ago and then before I went ahead, I got lucky.

    There are a lot of companies in my area that build and sell computers and I found one that was offering one equipped similar to mine but better. In addition, they did the work and guaranteed it. It is still running strong after 4+ years.

    Now, I have the urge again but am going back to them again.
     
  10. mooml

    mooml Thread Starter

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    Sorry i couldn't reply earlier but i went to a race. :D First off, thanks for all your replies.. i read each carefully and i am very satisfied with everyones input. The computer i have 'set up' is not a computer i plan on building. It's really a dream computer within a somewhat reasonable price. I already have an OS cd.. in fact i have a few so buying that is not a problem. My budget would have to be reasonable for a family comp.. plus i might be building a computer for myself and one for my older brother. So i have a line of computers that i need to consider. (Family comp, Gaming comp, and Work/Gaming comp) The whole processor thing is very confusing and that's just one thing i'de really like to understand. I see more GHz and i think it's better. I wouldn't want to be fooled out of my money buying something that isn't as good as another.. and that's why i want to learn what all the specs for different hardware mean. I could really use the experience of choosing parts and building a full computer... i plan on helping out other family members and friends with their computers... for a fee i mean. ;) Thank you techno lust for your list of prices. That is very useful. Again, if any of you know what website or what book i can read to help me learn these sort of things i would be very thankful. Also.. if you wouldn't mind.. where did you learn what specifications meant what, and which piece of hardware was better than another one.
     
  11. justfoo

    justfoo

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    This is a great site mooml,(interesting name btw)
    Its called how stuff works, here is the link to microprocessors: http://computer.howstuffworks.com/microprocessor.htm
    These guys put it in laypersons terms, and it should help you a lot. I'd say read about microprocessors, and then jump back to here:http://computer.howstuffworks.com
    and check out how cache works and other stuff. It doesn't go into name brand specifics, but it should give you some basic knowledge.
    Good luck to you.
    DF
    Edit: OOPS in reading a little of that page again, I realize it does kind of dwell on Intel, sorry for the comment above.
     
  12. rockinmale

    rockinmale

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    I think this site will help you out......It's called tom's hardware. They review and benchmark all different kinds of stuff. Between cpu's to video cards, etc. Plus they have a lot of information to read. So, if you wanna know what SLI is they can tell you in detail.

    Here's a link
    www.tomshardware.com
     
  13. mooml

    mooml Thread Starter

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    OK. Thanks a bunch for the links. I've heard of howstuffworks but didn't know they had that much stuff. I'm gonna be camping for the next week but when i come back i'll read up on that. Thanks again for your time.. and the links! :)
     
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