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Bios video setting with new video card

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Hansjurg, Mar 27, 2011.

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  1. Hansjurg

    Hansjurg Thread Starter

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    I have an Intel mother board with onboard video. In getting ready to install my new pci-E video card, I checked BIOS settings and noted IGD DVMT memory and also aperture size. (These are for use of regular memory for the onboard video). Also the video select is set to auto for both primary video adaptor and to auto instead of pci-e and pci graphics.

    I will insert the new video card, powerup and disable the onboard video through device manager.

    When I insert the new video card and powerup, will the "software" disable the two IGD settings?
     
  2. Sharma7

    Sharma7

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    Sorry, I'm not sure what you're talking about but this is what happens:
    1. You install the new graphics card
    2. You start the computer
    3. Computer recognizes new graphics card and disables onboard (in certain motherboards onboard and pci-e can run at the same time).
    4. You install drivers
    5. Voila! Your graphics card will work

    Sorry if this is not what you wanted, but you don't usually have to worry about anything else.
     
  3. Elvandil

    Elvandil

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    Software rarely affects anything in BIOS. You will still need to use system memory for your card, and the more you can give for texture memory ("aperture"), the better, so long as you have enough that it doesn't affect system operation.

    You should select the card that you want to use in BIOS when you reboot. It is also better to disable the onboard through BIOS (if there is an option), or, sometimes with a board jumper. But leave the old one enabled in Windows until you get the new one up and running, with the latest drivers installed. If you need to get back into Windows with the old graphics, it will still work.

    You may actually need to make the BIOS changes with the old connector and then switch to the new one.
     
  4. win2kpro

    win2kpro

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    On most later Intel boards you don't have to do anything after installing a PCIe card the motherboard automatically selects the highest of the hierarchy of graphics devices installed and assigns it as the primary device.

    Your board is not a standard Intel board it is a Gateway proprietary board with a Gateway proprietary BIOS. Follow the instructions provided by Gateway for graphics card installation.
     
  5. dai

    dai

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    what model video card

    power supply

    brand
    model
    wattage

    usually video upgrades and psu upgrades go hand in hand
     
  6. Hansjurg

    Hansjurg Thread Starter

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    Dai,
    Graphics board: EVGA 01G-P3-N959-TR GeForce 9500 Video Card 1 GB, DDR2 PCI-E 2, SLi Support Dual link, Dual DVI, HDTV VGA

    PSU Diablotek 400 W (don't have model #) purchased w assistance of Tiger Direct. It works in current system (w/o new card installed). Video card requires minimum of 350w. Original was 306w, thus the change.

    MotherBoard: Intel D915GSE

    Note: BIOS settings set to auto for location of video chipset.
    Later this week (I teach college and classes will give uninterrupted time for computer work) I will 1.)power down, 2.)insert new card; 3.) connect monitor to new card; 4.) power up;5) if I can see on monitor, will disable old video through device manager;6.) and then install new drivers. Hope this sequence sounds logical. Comments?
     
  7. dai

    dai

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  8. Elvandil

    Elvandil

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    A minimum of 350, but that does not include what you should have if you use any powered peripherals or have any added drives. 400 watts is cutting it very close and it may not even be enough to power your system. Even if it is, running a PSU close to its capacity means it won't last long.

    You should have 500+. I'm using 750 w for a 9800GTX.
     
  9. dai

    dai

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    it's amps not watts that are the key
     
  10. Elvandil

    Elvandil

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    Same measure. The voltage is constant, so when watts go up, amps go up. It is 2 ways of saying the same thing. They don't sell PSU's by amps.
     
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