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bought new Desktop PC..replacing old XP..how do I get my Network back up and running

Discussion in 'Networking' started by Stakeouttoo, May 24, 2011.

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  1. Stakeouttoo

    Stakeouttoo Thread Starter

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    I just bought a new Dell Desktop PC running Windows 7 Home Premium.. haven't set it up yet... it's replacing my old Gateway Desktop XP that is having a power supply fan problem but is still running...barely..... it was time for a new one after almost 10 years...

    what is the best way to make the new Dell PC the Main PC on my small Home network replacing my old Gateway which is the Main PC now.... do I have to start a setup with a new network totally... or is there another way using the old network and settings.. which is hopefully easier than a complete new network setup.. I am using a Belkin N+ Wireless router with an Ethernet cable into my currect Gateway Desktop

    any help greatly appreciated..
     
  2. pedroguy

    pedroguy

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    Well,if you have an existing,working network,I might just give this a go and see what happens>
    Tips on setting up broadband connection, courtesy of Johnwill

    You don't need any setup disk to configure a broadband router.


    . The following procedure should get you a connection with any broadband modem that is configured to use DHCP for the router connection, such as cable modems, and many DSL modems. If you require PPPoE configuration for the DSL modem, that will have to be configured to match the ISP requirements.
    • Turn off everything, the modem, router, computer.
    • Connect the modem to the router's WAN/Internet port.
    • Connect the computer to one of the router's LAN/Network ports.
    • Turn on the modem, wait for a steady connect light.
    • Turn on the router, wait for two minutes.
    • Boot the computer.

    When the computer is completely booted, let's see this.

    Hold the Windows key and press R, then type CMD (COMMAND for W98/WME) to open a command prompt:

    NOTE: For the items below in red surrounded with < >, see comments below for the actual information content, they are value substitutions from the previous command output!

    In the command prompt window that opens, type type the following commands one at a time, followed by the Enter key:

    IPCONFIG /ALL

    PING <computer_IP_address>

    PING <default_gateway_address>

    PING <dns_servers>

    PING 206.190.60.37

    PING yahoo.com

    Right click in the command window and choose Select All, then hit Enter to copy the contents to the clipboard.
    Paste the results in a message here.
     
  3. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    Terry
    What is it that makes a computer your "Main PC"?
     
  4. Stakeouttoo

    Stakeouttoo Thread Starter

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    I use it as my 'Main PC'.. it is the main one in my small Home network and is the one I use 90% of the time ... I have the router wired into it with an ethernet cable... so to me that is my Main PC...

    I'm just trying to figure out if there is a way not to do a complete new setup for a new network and still use my existing one now that the old PC will be taken down and not be operating.. and hopefully find a way to transfer network settings to the new Desktop that I'll use most of the time... in other words replace the new with the old

    the modem setup should be no problem as it's plug and play...
     
  5. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    OK, that's pretty much how I define my "Main PC." :) While it's important to us humans, for networking the designation means nothing; each of the computers connected to the router is equivalent. As soon as you connect the new computer to your router it will be on your network.
     
  6. pedroguy

    pedroguy

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    I think if you follow the steps in post #2,as Terry indicates,the "new pc" will become part of your network without much more tweeking.The router should control network addressing assignment.
    If resources are being shared between different operating systems and pc's,some settings may have to be changed,but nothing major,
     
  7. Stakeouttoo

    Stakeouttoo Thread Starter

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    many thanx.. I'll give it a try.. just thought there would be more to it than that....
     
  8. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    Maybe you are thinking of things you haven't yet written here, such as file or printer sharing?
     
  9. Stakeouttoo

    Stakeouttoo Thread Starter

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    have no problems with printer/file sharing... just never was in a position to replace this old Gateway Desktop that I use most often and consider the main PC in my home network..
     
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