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Broken News

Discussion in 'Random Discussion' started by plschwartz, Jan 8, 2003.

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  1. plschwartz

    plschwartz Thread Starter

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    Perhaps my contributions yesterday were not in keeping with the tenor of a thread with a similar name. I do apologize. Instead may I offer this thread for other types of interesting media stories.
    Would appreciate a moderator moving my replies from "breaking News" to here.
     
  2. plschwartz

    plschwartz Thread Starter

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    Book claims Chinese discovered America

    By FREDERICK M. WINSHIP
    From the Life & Mind Desk
    Published 1/7/2003 11:49 AM

    NEW YORK, Jan. 7 (UPI) -- Scattered evidence that Chinese explorers "discovered" America 71 years before Christopher Columbus and circumnavigated the earth 60 years before Ferdinand Magellan was born has been brought into convincing focus by a book published Tuesday that is expected to rewrite history.

    British author Gavin Menzies first aired his theory of pre-Columbian visits by the Chinese to both North and South America in a lecture before the Royal Geographic Society in London last March, resulting in a bidding war for the book he spent 15 years writing to back up his claim. Publishing rights sold for $780,000, a phenomenal sum for a non-fiction book by an unknown author.

    The book was published in England in November under the title "1421: The Year China Discovered America" and is now available in an augmented American edition published by William Morrow. A 16-page postscript in the new edition offers evidence that the body of a Chinese official was found buried at Teotihuacan, the pre-Aztec ceremonial site near Mexico City.

    The Chinese-style tomb with Chinese inscriptions found by archaeologist William Niven at the base of the Pyramid of the Sun at Teotihuacan in 1911 contained a body identified as a Chinese or Mongolian wearing a necklace of jade, unknown in Mexico.

    Menzies, who portions of the body were split between Swiss and Swedish collections, and he hopes to get permission to take DNA samples from the remains.

    The author, a 65-year-old retired Royal Navy officer and navigation expert, began formulating his theory when he was shown a map of the world dated 1459 while doing research in Venice. The map clearly showed Southern Africa and the Cape of Good Hope, though Vasco da Gama did not "discover" the cape as a sea route to Asia until 1497. The map noted that a voyage had been made around the cape in 1420.

    The map also bore a picture of a Chinese junk. Menzies believes the map was based on Chinese charts taken to Venice by a merchant traveler, Niccolo da Conti, who claimed in a book he wrote in 1434 that he joined a Chinese treasure fleet in India and sailed to China via Australia, 350 years before Captain Cook's expedition reached the Antipodes. There is no evidence of these Chinese charts, but Menzies presumes they existed.

    His findings in Venice led Menzies to research existing Chinese documents describing the outfitting of a great treasure fleet by the Yongle Emperor, Zhui Di, under the command of his eunuch admiral Zheng Hi. The fleet of many-masted junks that were five times the size of European caravels and carried 1,000 men each made seven great voyages from 1405 to 1423 when the ships were mothballed as the result of an expensive land campaign against the invading Mongols.

    It had long been known that Zheng Hi's ships sailed around Southeast Asia, crossing the Indian Ocean to the Red Sea and the Persian Gulf, but Menzies is convinced they also sailed around the Cape of Good Hope to Western Africa and across the Atlantic to the Eastern coast of North America, from Florida to Rhode Island, and parts of the South American coast. Other Chinese ships cleared Cape Horn and explored the Western coast of both South and North America, he claims.

    Zheng Hi was also known by the name of Sin Bao, hence the legend that arose in Europe of the fabulous voyages of Sinbad the Sailor.

    Menzies writes that after his lecture before the Royal Geographic Society, "new evidence began to pour in from all over the world, all of which had to be evaluated and checked for accuracy by experts." He said he has been notified of new discoveries from Vancouver Island to Chile that lend credence to his claim that Chinese fleets visited the Americas, leaving bloodline traces that only recently have been found in the DNA of Indians living in Northern Brazil, Venezuela, Surinam and Guyana.

    In the United States, the accumulation of evidence of a pre-Columbian Chinese presence is strongest in California, around San Francisco, the Mississippi River area west of Kansas City, and Florida, the book says. Other American areas probably visited or even settled by Chinese are said to be Mexico between the Pacific coast and Mexico City, the Caribbean coast of Venezuela, Colombia, and Guyana, and the Amazon Basin.

    Menzies reports 50 ancient stone carvings of ships believed to be Chinese and 40 of horses -- extinct in America after 10,000 B.C. -- from the floodplains of he Mississippi. He quotes 16th century Spanish historian Pedro de Castaneda as saying he met people resembling Chinese living along the Arkansas River and his contemporary, Pedro Menendez, as saying he saw the wrecks of gilded Chinese vessels on the banks of the Missouri River.

    Menendez's report no longer seems incredible in light of the discovery 20 years ago of a medieval Chinese-style junk buried under a sandbank in the Sacramento River off the northeast corner of San Francisco Bay, Menzies says. Fragments of wood taken from the ship have been carbon-dated to 1410 and identified as cut from Keteleria, a Chinese evergreen tree unknown in America.

    The author offers long lists of plants, animals, and birds that were carried to the Americas, probably by foreign visitors, in the pre-Columbian era. The first European explorers found fields of rice -- a crop foreign to the Americas but common in Asia -- in Mexico and Brazil and Chinese root crops in the Amazon basin. The list goes on and on.

    This book is likely to be the most fascinating read of 2003.

    ("1421, The Year China Discovered America," by Gavin Menzies, William Morrow, 576 pages, $27.95.)
    Copyright © 2001-2003 United Press International

    What if the Chinese press their claim to California. You may remember in Blade Runner LA was portrayed as a Chinese city.
    Maybe we can just offer them Mammoth Mountain instead
     
  3. plschwartz

    plschwartz Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2000
    Messages:
    11,451
    Book claims Chinese discovered America

    By FREDERICK M. WINSHIP
    From the Life & Mind Desk
    Published 1/7/2003 11:49 AM

    NEW YORK, Jan. 7 (UPI) -- Scattered evidence that Chinese explorers "discovered" America 71 years before Christopher Columbus and circumnavigated the earth 60 years before Ferdinand Magellan was born has been brought into convincing focus by a book published Tuesday that is expected to rewrite history.

    British author Gavin Menzies first aired his theory of pre-Columbian visits by the Chinese to both North and South America in a lecture before the Royal Geographic Society in London last March, resulting in a bidding war for the book he spent 15 years writing to back up his claim. Publishing rights sold for $780,000, a phenomenal sum for a non-fiction book by an unknown author.

    The book was published in England in November under the title "1421: The Year China Discovered America" and is now available in an augmented American edition published by William Morrow. A 16-page postscript in the new edition offers evidence that the body of a Chinese official was found buried at Teotihuacan, the pre-Aztec ceremonial site near Mexico City.

    The Chinese-style tomb with Chinese inscriptions found by archaeologist William Niven at the base of the Pyramid of the Sun at Teotihuacan in 1911 contained a body identified as a Chinese or Mongolian wearing a necklace of jade, unknown in Mexico.

    Menzies, who portions of the body were split between Swiss and Swedish collections, and he hopes to get permission to take DNA samples from the remains.

    The author, a 65-year-old retired Royal Navy officer and navigation expert, began formulating his theory when he was shown a map of the world dated 1459 while doing research in Venice. The map clearly showed Southern Africa and the Cape of Good Hope, though Vasco da Gama did not "discover" the cape as a sea route to Asia until 1497. The map noted that a voyage had been made around the cape in 1420.

    The map also bore a picture of a Chinese junk. Menzies believes the map was based on Chinese charts taken to Venice by a merchant traveler, Niccolo da Conti, who claimed in a book he wrote in 1434 that he joined a Chinese treasure fleet in India and sailed to China via Australia, 350 years before Captain Cook's expedition reached the Antipodes. There is no evidence of these Chinese charts, but Menzies presumes they existed.

    His findings in Venice led Menzies to research existing Chinese documents describing the outfitting of a great treasure fleet by the Yongle Emperor, Zhui Di, under the command of his eunuch admiral Zheng Hi. The fleet of many-masted junks that were five times the size of European caravels and carried 1,000 men each made seven great voyages from 1405 to 1423 when the ships were mothballed as the result of an expensive land campaign against the invading Mongols.

    It had long been known that Zheng Hi's ships sailed around Southeast Asia, crossing the Indian Ocean to the Red Sea and the Persian Gulf, but Menzies is convinced they also sailed around the Cape of Good Hope to Western Africa and across the Atlantic to the Eastern coast of North America, from Florida to Rhode Island, and parts of the South American coast. Other Chinese ships cleared Cape Horn and explored the Western coast of both South and North America, he claims.

    Zheng Hi was also known by the name of Sin Bao, hence the legend that arose in Europe of the fabulous voyages of Sinbad the Sailor.

    Menzies writes that after his lecture before the Royal Geographic Society, "new evidence began to pour in from all over the world, all of which had to be evaluated and checked for accuracy by experts." He said he has been notified of new discoveries from Vancouver Island to Chile that lend credence to his claim that Chinese fleets visited the Americas, leaving bloodline traces that only recently have been found in the DNA of Indians living in Northern Brazil, Venezuela, Surinam and Guyana.

    In the United States, the accumulation of evidence of a pre-Columbian Chinese presence is strongest in California, around San Francisco, the Mississippi River area west of Kansas City, and Florida, the book says. Other American areas probably visited or even settled by Chinese are said to be Mexico between the Pacific coast and Mexico City, the Caribbean coast of Venezuela, Colombia, and Guyana, and the Amazon Basin.

    Menzies reports 50 ancient stone carvings of ships believed to be Chinese and 40 of horses -- extinct in America after 10,000 B.C. -- from the floodplains of he Mississippi. He quotes 16th century Spanish historian Pedro de Castaneda as saying he met people resembling Chinese living along the Arkansas River and his contemporary, Pedro Menendez, as saying he saw the wrecks of gilded Chinese vessels on the banks of the Missouri River.

    Menendez's report no longer seems incredible in light of the discovery 20 years ago of a medieval Chinese-style junk buried under a sandbank in the Sacramento River off the northeast corner of San Francisco Bay, Menzies says. Fragments of wood taken from the ship have been carbon-dated to 1410 and identified as cut from Keteleria, a Chinese evergreen tree unknown in America.

    The author offers long lists of plants, animals, and birds that were carried to the Americas, probably by foreign visitors, in the pre-Columbian era. The first European explorers found fields of rice -- a crop foreign to the Americas but common in Asia -- in Mexico and Brazil and Chinese root crops in the Amazon basin. The list goes on and on.

    This book is likely to be the most fascinating read of 2003.

    ("1421, The Year China Discovered America," by Gavin Menzies, William Morrow, 576 pages, $27.95.)
    Copyright © 2001-2003 United Press International
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    What if the Chinese press their claim to California. You may remember in Blade Runner LA was portrayed as a Chinese city.
    Maybe we can just offer them Mammoth Mountain instead
     
  4. angelize56

    angelize56 Always remembered in our hearts

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2002
    Messages:
    82,163
    pl: To me breaking news is something to know about or post about when it happens...like today's plane crash in NC. Lately the breaking news thread has been more different type articles. So this thread is a good idea. Breaking news isn't always relevant to everyone in every state or country so it can have some odd posts here and there too. Kind of have to decide where to post....articles of note, oddly enough, breaking news....so broken news is a great idea! The plane crash today was definitely breaking news. Take care. angel :)

    What do you think Bruce since you started the breaking news thread. :)
     
  5. bigh47

    bigh47

    Joined:
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    Messages:
    1,091
    BTW the Vikings found America (or what ever they called it) about a 1000years before China or Spanish.

    Howard:D
     
  6. pyritechips

    pyritechips Gone but Never Forgotten

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2002
    Messages:
    26,907
    First Name:
    Jim
    Vikings landed on Newfoundland in circa 1000 AD. In 1961 archeologists discovered their settlement at L'anse Au Meadows, at the northern tip of the island. The Vikings called it Vinland. The site was the first authentic Viking settlement and is a World Heritage Site.
     
  7. eggplant43

    eggplant43 A True Heart and Soul - Gone But Never Forgotten

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2001
    Messages:
    17,198
    I find the information on the Chinese Explorers fascinating. Thanks for posting that info. In answer to Agelize's question to me, this is how I started "Breaking News":


    My interest in starting these different threads was to have threads that represented "Areas Of Interest" within Random so that people could post in an ongoing thread, as opposed to starting a thread each time something came up, having a proliferation of threads that went for 3 or 4 posts, and confusion. I thought of this as a way to simplify.

    So here's how I see it:


    Breaking News - For crashes, kidnappings, murders, things that are happening right now, like the OJ parade.

    Articles of Note - Articles you've read, interested you, and you want to share with others.

    Oddly Enough - Stories about the human condirtion/human interest stories.

    Some other members have started New Threads along these same lines, like:


    Computer Related Articles - Articles related to Computing and the Internet.

    Up Beat Stories - Positive stories, things that uplift you.

    Broken Stories - too new to tell yet, off to a good start.


    My $.02 worth:)
     
  8. plschwartz

    plschwartz Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2000
    Messages:
    11,451
    (first three chapters translator J. Garon)

    If you can talk about it,
    it ain't Tao.
    If it's got a name,
    it's just another thing.

    Tao doesn't have a name.
    Names are for ordinary stuff.

    Stop wanting stuff. It keeps you from seeing what's real.
    When you want stuff, all you see are things.


    2
    If something's beautiful, something's got to be ugly.
    If something's good, something's got to be bad.

    You can't have something without nothing.
    If no task is difficult, then no task is easy.
    Things are up high because other things are down low.

    So, the Master gets s**t done with moving a muscle
    and signifies without saying a word.
    When s**t happens, he doesn't blink.
    When things fall apart, he stays cool.
    He doesn't own much, but he's got a lot.
    He does his work without expecting any favors.
    When the job's finished, he moves on to the next job.
    That's why his work is so damn good.


    3
    If you cut people too much slack,
    they're going to come up short.
    If you give things too much value,
    they're going to get ripped off.
    The Master leads
    by clearing the crap out of people's heads
    and beefing up their hearts.
    He lowers their sights
    and makes them suck in their guts.
    He shows them how to forget what they know and what they wanted.
    If you think you've got the answers, he'll mess with your head.

    Stop doing stuff all the time,
    and watch things happen.
     
  9. angelize56

    angelize56 Always remembered in our hearts

    Joined:
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    82,163
    Bruce: Yep we're in total agreement as to where the news stories and such belong. Glad you posted that. :) Take care. Marlene (angel) :)
     
  10. Shadow Bea

    Shadow Bea Cherished forever in our hearts

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2002
    Messages:
    8,924
    Hi plschwartz:
    interesting article on the Chinese :) I'd like to read the book, I have always found history fascinating.
    however I am of the possible erroneous opinion
    that one can not discover a continent which is already occupied by a people :) unless we mean discover for another people :D
     
  11. plschwartz

    plschwartz Thread Starter

    Joined:
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    One of the things that interest me is the notion that with discovery comes the right of possession
    If I say "Bea I discovered this marvelous little resturant." and tell you about it., would you feel free to go there with another friend without mentioning to me? Or won't we get a little mad when we see in written up in the Times?
    Well the Chinese along with the other imperial types feel able to claim a country they "found" .
    So I was bemused by the idea of them claiming California. Maybe in another ten years they will feel ready.
     
  12. Shadow Bea

    Shadow Bea Cherished forever in our hearts

    Joined:
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    LOL ..that sort of thing always happens to me .. I discover something (like in Paris) and the next thing you know its in Macy's windows across the country:D and Yes I would mention that you found the restaurant (at least the first few times) :)
    Bea
     
  13. plschwartz

    plschwartz Thread Starter

    Joined:
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    Messages:
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    Vampire saliva could help treat stroke

    UPI Science News
    From the Science & Technology Desk
    Published 1/9/2003 4:33 PM

    VICTORIA, Australia, Jan. 9 (UPI) -- The saliva from vampire bats might be effective in improving the treatment for stroke, a new study released Thursday concludes.

    The bats -- bloodsuckers by nature but reviled in pop culture -- have saliva that contains a blood clot-busting substance called Desmodus rotundus salivary plasminogen activator, or DSPA or desmoteplase, which can be administered to stroke patients three times longer than current drugs used to treat the condition.

    Researchers led by Robert Medcalf, senior research fellow at Monash University Department of Medicine at Box Hill Hospital in Victoria, compared the effects of DSPA to the only drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration for ischemic stroke.

    As reported in the January issue of the journal Stroke, they injected either DSPA or the stroke drug -- called recombinant tissue plasmingen activator or rt-PA -- into the brains of mice. The researchers then induced stroke in the animals and tracked the survival of the brain cells.

    They found DSPA proved more effective in zeroing in on fibrin, a sort of structural scaffolding for blood clots. When exposed to fibrin, the clot-busting abilities of DSPA jumped 13,000-fold compared to only 72-fold from rt-PA.

    Furthermore, the study showed DSPA was effective for several hours after the stroke occurred. The drug rt-PA only works if given during a very short period -- three hours with the onset of stroke symptoms.

    Another advantage of DSPA, researchers note, is it focused on the blood clot without causing brain cell damage. In contrast, rt-PA can enhance brain cell death if it is administered too long after a stroke occurs.

    Medcalf explained vampire bat saliva carries an anti-clotting substance called fibrinolytic to boost the victim's blood flow so the animal can continue feeding.

    "It is ironic, but remember that evolution has given the vampire bat a powerful means to keep blood ... unclotted," Medcalf told United Press International. "Rather than trying to manipulate the structure of a given protein to make the protein more effective/potent, in this case, nature has already done the job for us."

    DSPA has proven so promising, Medcalf added, that "human clinical trials testing DSPA in patients with ischemic stroke are currently underway in Europe, Asia, Australia and the USA." Ischemic stroke occurs when a blood clot or several clots block blood to the brain.

    Another type of stroke is called hemorrhagic stroke, in which a blood clot bursts. Hemorrhagic stroke was not examined in this study.

    Dr. Hal Unwin, a professor of neurology and stroke expert at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, said vampire bat saliva could mean the difference between life and death for many stroke victims.

    "It may double or triple the number of people who can be treated for acute stroke," Unwin told UPI. "It may be better because it's much more specific to the actual clot, where tPA works everywhere in the body."

    --
     
  14. plschwartz

    plschwartz Thread Starter

    Joined:
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    11,451
    Rare moss ends 130 years of celibacy

    LONDON (AP) --For more than 130 years, the rare Nowell's moss found on old limestone walls in northwest England has not been known to fruit and the plant has been listed as an endangered species.

    But scientists said they have found tiny brown cigar-shaped spores on a patch of the moss on a wall at Penyghent Hill in the undulating Yorkshire Dales -- the first time since 1866 that the moss is known to have reproduced.

    "I was absolutely overjoyed ... because I knew the history of the plant and I knew that the last person to see this was a famous botanist in the 1860s," Fred Rumsey, a plant biodiversity researcher at London's Natural History Museum who made the find, said Tuesday.

    Scientists from the University of Bradford and the Natural History Museum are now studying the plant's molecular and genetic makeup to find ways to protect it from further decline. They are also investigating the mites that have been damaging the plants by eating the female sex organs.

    "We may have to do some matchmaking -- 130 years is a very long time to go without sex," said Rumsey.

    The last person to see the moss fruit is thought to be a friend of John Nowell, the Victorian botanist who discovered the plant in 1866 and for whom it was named.

    Patches of Nowell's Moss have continued to grow on Yorkshire's traditional limestone walls, but its spread has declined as the walls have deteriorated. The plant produces no flowers, but shoots out its brownish spores after reproduction between male and female plants.

    Rumsey said researchers found the moss is "still abundant in small areas in low altitudes, but some of the colonies were all one sex and there were no opportunities for them to reproduce. In some of the sites there were both sexes, but they were a meter (yard) or two apart and that may not seem far, but for a very small sperm that is a long way to swim."

    "They need a continuous stream of moisture. Therefore the plants can't successfully colonize and so stopped reproducing sexually."

    The new fruiting probably happened when male and female moss came together on a wall on Penyghent Hill after being washed or blown down from nearby, Rumsey said.
     
  15. plschwartz

    plschwartz Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2000
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    11,451
    On February 13, 2002, Americans were warned that our nation was facing the threat of danger to homeland security. Three hours later it happened, but nobody told America. That day, John M. Poindexter was appointed Director of the Pentagon's Information Awareness Office.
    Meet
    America's



    Who's John Poindexter?
    A retired Navy Admiral, John Poindexter lost his job as National Security Adviser under Ronald Reagan, and was convicted of conspiracy, lying to Congress, defrauding the government, and destroying evidence in the Iran Contra scandal. [1]
    What's the Information Awareness Office (IAO)?
    It's a new office created by the Pentagon agency DARPA after 9/11 to gather intelligence through electronic sources like the internet, phone, and fax lines. [2]

    Why is a person convicted of those crimes being hired for such an important government post?
    The convictions were overturned in 1990, based on the fact that Congress had given him immunity in exchange for his testimony, even though the testimony he gave Congress turned out to not be true.
     
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