BSOD on laptop (Windows 10)

Joined
Dec 29, 2020
Messages
962
Looks like Mohittomar may be away.
Option 1) Download Ubuntu from my link and see if you get the option to try
OR Option 2) I was given this advise.
I think if OP still has different version of Ubuntu than you they have to select Ubuntu at that grub screen and then it boots to the Ubuntu desktop and offers the choice to install or try Ubuntu then.
As long as you DO NOT pick an install option.
 

enigmadragon

Phil
Thread Starter
Joined
Aug 4, 2011
Messages
108
Looks like Mohittomar may be away.
Option 1) Download Ubuntu from my link and see if you get the option to try
OR Option 2) I was given this advise.

As long as you DO NOT pick an install option.
I did download Ubuntu from your link and I did select Ubuntu from the grub screen and ask to try it or install and I picked try and all the files were empty.
 

mohittomar13

Mohit Tomar
Joined
May 2, 2011
Messages
548
Actually i spilled water on my laptop and couldn't find a shop to get it repaired. Well anyways, so I see Peter is trying so hard to get this problem fixed.

So below is my solution. Please do not mind typos as I am using my Android phone to type in all the steps.

Enigmadragon is finding folders as empty because these folders on the left of the file explorer belongs to ubuntu live OS not to windows os. So that explains why you see those folders empty.

In order to recover files from the windows installation you must first mount the drive. Unless you mount the drives the operating system wouldn't be able to read data from those drives. (Linux works a little differently than windows)

If you check in the file explorer on the bottom left corner you will find the option for other location. When you click on that it will show you windows drives. When you click on any of the listed drives the ubunty operating system would automatically Mount those drives for you.

If you are not able to find any drivers listed then you might have to open the Linux terminal and type the command

"lsblk"

The above command will list the block devices which are usually hard drives.

There is also a GUI based tool available in Ubuntu if you do not want to use the terminal. I use xubuntu so the tool name might be different.

But I would personally suggest to use the terminal as it provides some useful information.

Once you find the block device that is your C or D etc drive you then just need to manually mount it to copy your data.

If your system had to volumes c and d then you can copy the data from C and paste it into D.

Please first try to use the other location option before trying the other steps that I have mentioned.

I am not able to provide a complete solution because it's very hard to type using an Android device.

If you are not able to figure out what to do then just simply copy paste the output of the the "lsblk" command
 
Joined
Dec 29, 2020
Messages
962
Thank you mohittomar
I knew there was an option to mount but not sure how.
Mine works as a dual boot an the files appear
 

mohittomar13

Mohit Tomar
Joined
May 2, 2011
Messages
548
Okay so to be honest, yesterday I used voice typing to type the content. :giggle::giggle: My phone has a tiny display which was very difficult to scroll up and down.

Luckily the problem was not the water but the RAM which was not seated correctly in the slot. It might be because after the water evaporated it left some salts/dirt that resulted in the problem. Alright, so let us get to the main issue here.

Hi enigmadragon!! Follow the steps given below. Now I have my laptop so I can provide a better solution.

Steps
I'm assuming you are able to boot the live Ubuntu system.

NOTE: Linux does not support Volumes like Windows, so there is no concept of DriveC or DriveD. Everything resides under the "ROOT" directory which is identified by a simple forward slash '/'. So do not get confused.

  • If you are able to boot the live system without any problem then simply open the file explorer (Nautilus)
  • On the bottom left corner, you must see the option to go to Other Locations check the image below (Some images might be different as Linux uses different apps for different distributions, eg. Ubuntu uses Nautilus and Xubuntu uses Thunar, I use Xubuntu)
1620297943442.png

  • If after clicking on the Other Location you can find your disks C and D then the problem is almost solved at this stage itself.
  • You now just need to take a backup of the data as you would normally do in windows, so I'm not going into details about that.
  • If you do not find your disks listed in other locations then do not worry we can get your disks listed in Nautilus, its Linux so everything is possible :giggle: we just need to type some commands on the Linux terminal (command prompt in windows)
  • Open a terminal which would look something like this (I use xubuntu and customised it a little so the look might be different but the ultimate output would remain the same)
1620298474482.png

  • In the above image I've already ran lsblk and listed its output for you as that is what you need to run too
  • You need to run the above command as it would give you the names of the disk drives which starts with the letters sda and a number that identifies the partition
  • So now run lsblk command and it will list all the block devices in your computer. If you check the above image closely you would see that I've mounted sda4 on /media/mohit/diskC and sda5 on /media/mohit/diskD
  • In your case lsblk will output the devices (starts with sda) but you have to guess which one is C / D which is easy based on the size you can determine that
  • Now open nautilus and create directories DiskC and DiskD for C and D drive respectively under /mnt/
  • /mnt is a place that is provided by Linux to us when we want to mount some drives.
  • Now simply run the command
Bash:
sudo mount /dev/sdaXX /mnt/diskC
sudo mount /dev/sdaXX /mnt/diskD
The 'XX' in the above command tells the partition number for example 'sda4' and sda5 are my C and D drive. So replace XX with what you see in the lsblk output.

If everything worked fine then you must see your disks appear in the Nautilus under /mnt/diskC and /mnt/diskD. Take a backup and double-check that everything is properly copied. Then run the following command in the terminal

Bash:
sudo umount /mnt/diskC
sudo umount /mnt/diskD
It seems too complicated and too many steps but it isn't. You are new to linux that is why I had to mention even minute details.

I hope it helps.
Cheers (y)
 

enigmadragon

Phil
Thread Starter
Joined
Aug 4, 2011
Messages
108
OK I found my HDD under other locations but when I click on it it says unable to access location. I opened the file explorer and did lsblk but when I tried to figure out which one was my HDD it was not listed. I don't get it
 

mohittomar13

Mohit Tomar
Joined
May 2, 2011
Messages
548
Paste the output of lsblk, or you could try the following command

Command 1: This will open nautilus as ROOT (highest privilege), so you will be free to do anything you want. Create directories anywhere, move any data and delete any data from the disk (be careful with what you do).
Bash:
sudo nautilus
But, there is a very high chance this command won't work in Ubuntu as recently gksudo and sudo support is removed when opening GUI applications that needs root privilege. A new command is added that is better than the old way of doing things using gksudo and sudo. The command is pkexec which stands for policy-kit-execute.

Command 2: This works the same way as sudo but adds some neat options for sysadmins making their everyday task easy.
Bash:
pkexec env DISPLAY=$DISPLAY XAUTHORITY=$XAUTHORITY nautilus
I believe you shouldn't face any problem now as ROOT has access to all locations in the system.

But if you still face difficulties please let me know, I'll be more than happy to help you.
(y)(y)
 
Last edited:

mohittomar13

Mohit Tomar
Joined
May 2, 2011
Messages
548
You didn't read my previous post attentively. The solution is already provided. Anyways copy paste the following line in the terminal and then go to /mnt

sudo mount /dev/sda3 /mnt

Your DriveC now must be mounted at /mnt

If you still face problem then follow my previous post.
 
Joined
Dec 29, 2020
Messages
962
OK I found my HDD under other locations but when I click on it it says unable to access location. I opened the file explorer and did lsblk but when I tried to figure out which one was my HDD it was not listed. I don't get it
Could you give a picture of what is listed
 

mohittomar13

Mohit Tomar
Joined
May 2, 2011
Messages
548
In my 11 yrs of experience of using linux I haven't seen a case which was not resolved using the above solution. I feel there is something that you are missing. Share the pic of the error.
 

mohittomar13

Mohit Tomar
Joined
May 2, 2011
Messages
548
You didn't read my previous post attentively. The solution is already provided. Anyways copy paste the following line in the terminal and then go to /mnt

sudo mount /dev/sda3 /mnt

If you check closely you will see there is no diskc after /mnt. Copy and paste the following as it is do not add remove anything.

sudo mount /dev/sda3 /mnt

 

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