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Building a kernel

Discussion in 'Linux and Unix' started by loony_taz00, Apr 15, 2010.

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  1. loony_taz00

    loony_taz00 Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2005
    Messages:
    547
    Hi I am building a kernal first time and I am stuck with this error message


    [​IMG]
     
  2. lotuseclat79

    lotuseclat79

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2003
    Messages:
    20,583
    Hi loony_taz00,

    I assume you have built your kernel and are now trying to boot from a bootable .iso image of the kernel - is that correct?

    Your message looks very similar to a .iso image boot problem I had when the compressed squahsfs built for the .iso bootable image did not contain either a /proc or a /sys directory. Go back to the setup you are using to compile the kernel, and make sure you have a chrooted directory structure that looks like the following:

    bin boot dev etc home lib media mnt opt proc root sbin selinux srv sys tmp usr var

    where you issue the chroot command to the directory with the above subdirectory structure - only the usr subdirectory needs to be populated with the linux kernel sources, and you are compiling the new kernel in the directory /usr/src/linux

    I have built the Ubuntu 9.10 kernel image and header packages in this kind of setup and it looks like after building the kernel (if you are compressing the new kernel image into a squashfs image for a .iso bootable image) that the squashfs origin components do not have at least the /proc (ok emply) - i.e. it just needs to be part of the compressed squashfs image.

    Note: I just so happen to build the kenel image within that overall structure - which is the same (only populated) for the compressed squashfs .iso image that gets burned to a bootable CD.

    -- Tom
     
  3. lotuseclat79

    lotuseclat79

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2003
    Messages:
    20,583
    Hi loony_taz00,

    Please ignore my previuos comments which are in error regarding this problem.

    After thinking about the above comments, your error message does indicate the /proc was mounted - so, I was not right on that account - /proc did exist, but the first error message after that indicated that module char-major-10-35 could not be located even though the state OK was observed - you can probably ignore that. Next, the path /proc/bus/usb does not exist as well as /proc/bus/usdb/drivers and modules hid, keyboarddev, and mousedev. And after that the root filesystem checked out clean.

    At this point I would suspect that if you are not able to boot up at all, then I would open the chassis of your desktop and check that all of your hardware devices, particularly the usb adaptors, are properly connected (you may have a loose connection regarding one of them).

    Hope this helps.

    -- Tom
     
  4. lotuseclat79

    lotuseclat79

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2003
    Messages:
    20,583
    Hi loony_taz00,

    If what you saw on your screen but were not able to include in the screenshot provided in post#1 included a filesystem check which failed - your symptoms may be similar to a problem I saw on another website - you can do the following:

    Bootup into a Live CD of Linux and run fsck against the disk/partition involved. After that if you are able to boot up into Red Hat, then do the following:

    $ sudo apt-get install smartmontools
    after that install, then run
    $ smartctl --test=short /dev/<partition or disk>, e.g. /dev/sdb <-- disk
    This will run a short test on the hard drive.
    Then run:
    $ sudo smartctl -H
    This will give you the health status of your hard disk.
    If you want a more in depth analysis, run a long test:
    $ smartctl --test=long /dev/<partition or disk>, e.g. /dev/sdb2 <-- partition

    Then run "sudo smartctl -H" again. These tests should give you a good indication on whether it's time to replace the disk.

    -- Tom
     
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