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Building mid-end PC

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Scudstorm, Aug 6, 2011.

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  1. Scudstorm

    Scudstorm Thread Starter

    Joined:
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    Messages:
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    Hello!

    I'll be building a mid-end PC, and I would like some opinion on the parts I've chosen (with minimal research). This machine will mainly be used for programming using Delphi XE (and likely future versions), and things such as converting video file formats in the background. It is intended to last quite a few years without falling obsolete, and to be reasonably upgradeable if it comes to that. I will be running Win7 64-bit.

    So far what I've got are these:

    CPU: Intel Core i5-2500k 3.3GHz
    MB: Gigabyte GA-Z68A-D3H-B3
    RAM: Corsair XMS3 2x2GB DDR3 1600 <- do I need 8Gb or is 4 enough?
    HD: WD Caviar Black 1TB 7200RPM 64Mb cache 6.0Gb/s <- is 6.0Gb/s actually better than 3.0?
    GPU: EVGA GeForce GT 520 (Fermi) 1Gb
    PSU: Rosewill Stallion Series 500W ATX12V <- good enough? or do I need to cough up 50$ more for a Corsair unit?
    Case: Antec 300 Illusion Black Steel ATX

    I already have the monitor, keyboard, mouse, CD-rom and OS. Cost is around 700$ after shipping, which I find satisfactory enough.

    Any input is welcome :) Even though I feel the parts are fitting for the job and think they're compatible, I'm far from secure enough in my -very limited- hardware knowledge to just order all this without running it by you guys first ^^

    Thanks in advance!

    Scud
     
  2. Elvandil

    Elvandil

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    51,988
    Just one suggestion. You may do better money-wise if you start with a barebone kit. You can then add the parts of your choosing that are not included with the kit.

    Generally, it costs much more to build a machine from parts than to buy an equivalent one already made. The kits tend to reverse that and give a major head-start.

    I have built my last 3 machines that way, including the one I'm using now (hover over the computer near my name) for around $800, about what you are spending.

    http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/category/category_tlc.asp?CatId=31&srkey=barebone kits
     
  3. tom6049

    tom6049

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  4. win2kpro

    win2kpro

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  5. Scudstorm

    Scudstorm Thread Starter

    Joined:
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    Messages:
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    Thank you for your input :) Here's what I need help with at this point:

    - Barebone kits:
    Is it possible to swap some components out? The only i5 kit I've found that's similar to my setup is this one. It has a slightly bigger HD, doesn't include a GPU but does have a CD-ROM, which evens things out a bit. The price still came to 700$ after shipping and taxes though (the price I gave in the first post included those too), which makes me wonder if barebone kits are really cheaper :S The PSUs that come with all their kits are no good at all :(

    - GPU:
    Hmm I get the slowest component part, but is there a reason I need something more powerful than the card I listed? This PC won't be performing anything that's graphics heavy, not even anything at the level of webcams. Similarly for the RAM, if no application ever pushes RAM usage near 3Gb (which is what I personally expect from Delphi, but I could be wrong), isn't 4Gb all I'd need?

    -PSU:
    I was so sure someone's gonna say that haha... Those sell for a bit more in Canada unfortunately (pushes final price to 763$) but I guess I can live with that. Though for my information only: isn't a powerful PSU mostly needed to carter to the needs of a big bad GPU?
     
  6. dustyjay

    dustyjay

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    First Name:
    Jay
    Look at a power supply this way. Every component in your computer depends on the power supply providing the proper reliable power to operate properly. Cheap power supplies such as the Rosewill power supply you chose are really low quality and possibly hazardous to your components. When cheap low quality power supplies burn out they often also burn out other major components of your system, such as the motherboard, Processor, Ram, Video Cards, HDDs. The PSU that win2kpro linked to is not a "powerful" PSU per se, it is an upper end of average in that catagory, yet it is a high quality, well constructed PSU, by a reliable and well respected manufacturer.
     
  7. dustyjay

    dustyjay

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    Jay
    Also for the ram, it woud depend on the OS you are planning to run. If a 32bit OS then 4Gb is the most you could use. If a 64 bit OS then you could go more, but if you are not planning to run anything that would benefit from increased ram then 4Gb is all you would need.
     
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