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Burning a data CD

Discussion in 'Multimedia' started by herc, Jan 23, 2005.

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  1. herc

    herc Thread Starter

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    In burning a data cd either to a CD-R or a CD-RW how do you avoid "closing" so as to be able to write once more to that CD?

    Any help would be greatly appreciated,

    herc :confused:
     
  2. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

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    It depends on the burning software you use. For Nero, I just select properties of the new compilation I've dragged-n-dropped into the CD window, and select the Multisession tab. I'm sure it's different for other software...
     
  3. herc

    herc Thread Starter

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    Sorry I forgot to mention I'm using Direct CD from Roxio Easy CD creator and Windows XP home edition OS

    herc :(
     
  4. slipe

    slipe

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    DirectCD is packet writing software which never closes the CD unless you tell it to.

    If you are formatting the CD you are using DirectCD. If you aren’t formatting the CD on first use you are using EZ CD Creator and not DirectCD. In that case you set it up to close the session but leave the CD open.

    DirectCD to CDR is probably the best way to save data. It makes sessions and they are secure. A session takes only about 7Mb of housekeeping space compared to about 14Mb using multisession with mastering software, which makes it more practical to save smaller sessions. When the CD is full you can close it out to read in any CD-ROM drive.

    DirectCD to RW is about the most insecure place you can find for your data. There are no sessions and everything can be modified – or infected. The table of contents stays in RAM until you eject the disk, so if you lose power or have a crash you often have to use recovery software to get your data because a current TOC isn’t on the disk. RW media itself isn’t as reliable long term as CDR. It is OK for short term backup but not for archive of data you remove from the computer.
     
  5. herc

    herc Thread Starter

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    Thanks much to both of you for your help and clarification. Thanks also slipe for your heads up on CD-R's vs CD-RW's. I have already experienced a corruption problem on a CD-RW and was not aware of that possibility.

    Regards to both of you,

    herc (y)
     
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