1. Computer problem? Tech Support Guy is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations. Click here to join today! If you're new to Tech Support Guy, we highly recommend that you visit our Guide for New Members.

Burning of recorded streaming music

Discussion in 'Multimedia' started by buf, Apr 28, 2004.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Advertisement
  1. buf

    buf Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2001
    Messages:
    1,998
    How can I burn a 129MB file recorded in MP3 format to a CD? Recently I was listening to and recording streaming music from one radio station and that music is saved in one file. I would like to burn that music to CD(s) so that it can be played on home CD and car CD. Hope I am asking this question correctly. And as usual, TIA.
    BTW, I wasn't listening all the time the music was being recorded :D
     
  2. dogbonz

    dogbonz

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2001
    Messages:
    796
    Hi Buf,

    Yes, you can burn MP3s directly to a CD-R. It will comfortably hold
    up to 680 Megs or a bit more. Various software is out there to do
    it. See www.download.com for some of them. Even some free ones
    I think.

    I like "Ahead Nero", and "Roxio" seems pretty fast. Remember that
    some programs will convert the .mp3 format into .cda format - 10
    times bigger. It depends on whether you want them to stay in mp3
    or be playable on ordinary CD players.

    -bonzie
     
  3. eoJeoJ

    eoJeoJ

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2003
    Messages:
    107
    Keep in mind that if you burn the file as an MP3, that most "audio" players will probably not play them, unless its stated that they can play MP3 files.

    If you decide to burn it as CDA (which I suggest), then how big the size will not matter, what is important is how long the song is...normal CD-Rs can fit 70-80mins of music, dependant on which one you have. Therefore, even though your MP3 file is only 129MB, if its over the time limit of the CD-R, you will not be able to fit it all on one CD-R in audio format. Hope this helps :D
     
  4. buf

    buf Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2001
    Messages:
    1,998
    bonz/eoJeoJ: bonz, so we meet again finally. We "worked" together months ago on something else.
    I use Nero Express and the actual burning is not a problem but the properties for the music file in question shows over 9 hours of recording and used just 129MB in MP3 format. I don't claim to know much about such things but something about this is confusing and in essence, according to properties, I recorded 9 hours of music and only used 129MB. Does that sound right to you? I have dBPower Amp Music Converter installed and I think that will convert MP3 to CDA.
    I do want to burn the music to a CD that will allow me to play the burned CD in a regular home CD player and/or car CD player.
    I know that a 700MB blank CD will burn only "so much" and I think that is going to be my problem because I recorded 9 hours of music. (I am listening to the music that is stored on my PC as I am writing this)Spanning of CDs is not a viable option. I can't see a way of recording say, 75 minutes, and then burn another 75 minutes; etc. In fact, with the limited knowledge I have of such matters, I don't think I will be able to burn any of the saved music. Hope I am mistaken!! Thanks to each of you for your answer.
     
  5. dogbonz

    dogbonz

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2001
    Messages:
    796
    buf,

    9 hours does not sound right, I agree. Figure average mp3 is about
    4 minutes, so 129 megs should give you maybe 30 songs or so in
    MP3.

    Although newer players will "see" MP3 and play them (I have a recent
    DVD player that sees them and VCDs), figure about ten times
    the size for .cda files. 4 megs of MP3 would change to 35-40 megs of
    cda.

    As for burning cda formats on a disk, there should be no problem if you
    take each tune and put it in a list from the hard drive individually. Kinda
    just drag the individual tunes to the "record list". That works in both Roxio
    and Nero.

    If I recall, the files will STAY MP3 if you make a "data" disc, but will convert if you make a "Music" disk.

    Good Luck wid it.

    -bonzie
     
  6. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2002
    Messages:
    106,418
    There are many splitting applications that can split the MP3 file into individual songs for you, perhaps that's the way to go?
     
  7. LONGHAIR

    LONGHAIR

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2002
    Messages:
    1,525
    There is still the issue of "Copyright". Just because these are not P2P downloads doesn't mean that they can be duplicated.

    The whole point of radio is that you have to listen to the advertizing to get to the songs you like (and they pay the artist royalties) or you buy the CD so you can hear it when you want(thus paying the royaliy yourself)
     
  8. buf

    buf Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2001
    Messages:
    1,998
    Longhair, lets assume that you are correct about copying music for personal use that has been played over the radio air waves as being illegal but frankly I think you may be mistaken. This is not to be associated with music on a CD and copying same for personal use which is, as I understand, not illegal if the copy is to be a "backup" for the owner of the original CD. If you are correct then we as listeners should also be paying a royalty fee for listening to the radio!! The song writers; etc. have been paid repeatedly every time their song was or is played. Are we, and have we, performed illegal acts when we copy via a VCR a TV program? Even if the program is a musical concert? And then fast forward through the commercials!!
    Now, as far as the commercial ads that are recorded in the music I want to burn are concerned, will remain there because there is no way that I would try to edit 9 hours of music to remove the ads. Some of the "ads" are comments by the DJ describing the singer and the musicians and these are, therefore, of interest to me as the listener.
    There is much that I don't understand/agree with about such matters as these and I don't think I would try to circumvent the laws that govern such matters.
    I don't want trouble but this subject is generally debated over and over in forums and an all inclusive answer is yet to be seen by me. This could be an excellent subject to be put up by someone for debate; pro and con.
    Not one word of this post is meant to be an affront to you; nor your reply.
    I greatly appreciate your efforts to help people like me to understand our computers and the attempts to keep us updated on affairs that should be of interest to all of us.
     
  9. LONGHAIR

    LONGHAIR

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2002
    Messages:
    1,525
    It always has been illegal to record over the radio. It is severely reduced quality though, so no one much cared. The digital age has changed the quality issue. You can record it just as perfectly as it is played (bitrate)
    It is rather hard to prosecute too, but that doesn't change the fact that it is illegal. I see no difference between recording a stream and P2P, the result is the same.
    You are paying those royalties by listening to the advertising between songs. That is how the radio station make money to pay the royalties. Singers are paid when their music is played. :D

    Satellite Radio (XM, Sirius) do it by subscription and fewer commercials.
     
  10. buf

    buf Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2001
    Messages:
    1,998
    Thanks for your views and the Satellite Radio thought. (But, how does that remove the legal issue of recording? Are you saying that if I subscribe to Satellite Radio and pay to listen to it I could then legally record it? I think not!! Neither do I think that is your inference but I just had to ask the question.)
    I guess that is why many radio stations have stopped streaming--most say that the cost is too prohibitive and not cost effective. I always liked a streaming FM station in Palm Valley, CA but they stopped because of the above reason, or so they said.

    Your comment: I see no difference between recording a stream and P2P, the result is the same.
    You are paying those royalties by listening to the advertising between songs.

    And to which I reply: I see no difference between what you say above and the VCR scenario I gave in my last post.

    Let's look at it this way. If I keep the ads in the recorded music as a part of my "project", does that make it legal? Perhaps I am just being defensive in trying to justify my actions in this matter. If that is what I do, then I do not agree that I have broken any laws. :)
    Perhaps a MOD will weigh in on this and rule my inquiry out of order. I would welcome that and consider the matter closed and no further questions would be asked by me.
     
  11. buf

    buf Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2001
    Messages:
    1,998
    I have been away from my "project" most of the time but I not been able to think of a solution. I have converted the music files from MP3 to Wav files while playing around with the dB Power Amp converter. If I understand correctly, I want cda files but I also understand that Nero Express(?) will handle the conversion from MP3 to cda when I start to burn. Also, I see no way to "pull" certain songs from the recorded files to Nero, or a folder, because there isn't a list or a program of the songs that were played and recorded. I think I will just abandon the plan or hopes I had and start a fresh plan as follows.
    Perhaps my best way to do this would be to record in 75 minute segments, save it to a folder I would open and then have Nero burn it. Reminding you that I want to be able to play the burned CD on the home CD player and/or the car player. Tell me if you think this would work and also give any instructions you care to give to enable me to accomplish what I want to do.
    It almost sounds too simple :D
     
  12. Sponsor

As Seen On
As Seen On...

Welcome to Tech Support Guy!

Are you looking for the solution to your computer problem? Join our site today to ask your question. This site is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations.

If you're not already familiar with forums, watch our Welcome Guide to get started.

Join over 733,556 other people just like you!

Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Short URL to this thread: https://techguy.org/224730

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice