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Buying a computer in Singapore, moving it to Japan

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Jaradcel, Feb 22, 2010.

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  1. Jaradcel

    Jaradcel Thread Starter

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    Hi all, I'm moving to Japan soon and found out that they don't generally have DIY build it yourself computer shops there. It's far cheaper for me to buy my entire CPU system in Singapore, and then ship it to Japan rather than buying a fixed-up boxed from them.

    The problem is, Japan uses a different voltage from Singapore - 100volt sockets (2 pin) compared to SIngapore's 3pin 230 volts (at a 50volt cycle per second, whatever that means)

    I'm assuming, therefore, that if I were to buy everything here, I would find it difficult/dangerous to use my system in Japan? This despite a power plug converter? How do I go about solving this issue then? Do I need a different power supply box for my CPU Casing?

    It still has to be a pretty powerful supply box as I'm intending to use the computer for gaming, which means it'll suck power like a fiend....

    Any help would be appreciated. Thanks!
     
  2. cwwozniak

    cwwozniak Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    You could try finding a suitable PSU that can operate off of both 50 and 60 Hz AC mains frequencies as well have an input voltage range that can handle both 100 VAC and 230 VAC inputs. Some power supplies may have a voltage range selector switch while some may cover the whole range automatically.

    Don't forget to check the AC mains input limits for your monitor, printer, amplified speakers, etc.
     
  3. Abracaboom

    Abracaboom

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    Computers don't use either kind of AC current, they use DC and have a built-in adapter, which you would have to buy for your DIY computer (laptops use an external adapter attached to the power cord). I've never been to Singapore, but I don't see how it could be hard to find either an internal adapter for the voltage you want, or one with a switch that can work with both voltages. Or, worst case, shop for one on the internet and have it shipped to Japan.

    I've never been to Japan either, but I'll eat my hat if you can't buy those adapters there as well.
     
  4. Jaradcel

    Jaradcel Thread Starter

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    So I'd be looking for a DC PSU (that big hunk of rectangular rock) within my CPU Casing that would be able to switch between them (them being 100v and 250v) "at will" or with a switch, correct?
     
  5. Frank4d

    Frank4d Retired Trusted Advisor

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    If you are moving to a city that has a Yodobashi Camera store nearby, then you are in luck. You can buy a whole computer, or everything you need there to build a computer, or just a PSU. That would be better than a voltage converter, especially if the move is permanent.
     
  6. cwwozniak

    cwwozniak Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    I am not sure what Abracaboom was getting at. The individual components, mother board, hard drive, optical drives, video controller boards, etc. all run from relatively low DC voltages. These voltages are all produced from a Power Supply Unit (PSU) that has an AC voltage input. The PSU is the rectangular metal block usually with one or two of its own fans that mounts inside the rear of the computer enclosure.

    The actual range of the input AC voltage and frequency that will properly operate the PSU will depend on the brand and model number of the PSU. As I previously said, some PSUs can cover a wide voltage range automatically with no user intervention while some other PSUs may have an externally accessible voltage range selector switch. The ones with a manual switch need a bit of caution; applying 230 VAC with the switch set to a 100 -120 range would probably damage the PSU and possibly the hardware being powered by the PSU.

    EDIT: If you get a PSU that supports both the Singapore and Japanese AC mains standards, you will not need to get any kind of external adapters or converters. You will only need suitable power cords for each country to go from their particular outlet configuration to the input connector on the back of the computer's PSU. Depending on the AC mains specifications for any AC powered peripherals, you may need some type of AC power converter or new AC/DC power supply (wall wart or small brick) to run them.
     
  7. Abracaboom

    Abracaboom

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    Aren't we saying the same thing? Computers use DC, therefore the PSU would be a built-in adapter.
     
  8. cwwozniak

    cwwozniak Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    This is the first time I am hearing anyone ever refer to desktop PC's PSU as an "adapter".
     
  9. Abracaboom

    Abracaboom

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    It never hurts to know what lies behind a fancy name, cwwzniak.
     
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