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Cable connectors

Discussion in 'Networking' started by bruinator, Dec 6, 2006.

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  1. bruinator

    bruinator Banned Thread Starter

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    Just wondering what the following stand for when it comes to cable connectors

    SC
    ST
    mtrj
    fddi

    And are the used with the following

    10BaseF
    100BaseT
    100BaseTX

    Any help is appreciated.
     
  2. pinntech

    pinntech

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    They are Fiber Optic Cables. I don't have the exact definitions of all of the different types you mentioned. I do know that FDDI stands for "Fiber Distributed Data Interface". I could dig out my old book and look them up for you if really, really must know! LOL Sorry, just a little lazy tonight!
     
  3. bruinator

    bruinator Banned Thread Starter

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    if and when you get a chance...no hurry....thanks
     
  4. bruinator

    bruinator Banned Thread Starter

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  5. O111111O

    O111111O

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    (MTRJ) Mechanical Transfer Registered Jack * - Took off like a lead baloon.
    (ST) Straight Tip *
    (SC) Standard Connector ~
    (LC) Lucent / Local Connector (lucent invented) ~~
    (FDDI) Fiber Distributed Data Interface *

    * Very seldomly used anymore, if at all.
    ~ Still in use, everywhere (Single Mode and Multimode)
    ~~ Becomming defacto for high density installations (Ditto)


    10BaseF was implemented ST and SC connections, I believe some MTRJ (I only ever saw MTRJ or FOCIS with Token switches.)

    100BaseT/100BaseTX are copper implementations. They use RJ-45's.

    Here's a neat link with pictures of fiber connectors.

    http://www.ertyu.org/steven_nikkel/fiberconnect.html
     
  6. pinntech

    pinntech

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    He has them right. I pulled out the old book and looked them up!
     
  7. UNIKSERV

    UNIKSERV

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    Isn't FDDI still implemented in a double ring topology for some WAN implementations?

    Joe
     
  8. O111111O

    O111111O

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    Not really. FDDI was never really a WAN technology. More campus/metro Ethernet. Fairly high reliability, token passing, ring healing et al. Also, FDDI was primarily only 100MB, never any implementation for QOS n' such. By today's standards it's fairly useless.

    A similar newer technology (RPR) is in production in many locations. It utilizes packet-over-SONET (POS) as the bearer, and typically delivers GigEthernet in a ring fashion. See it alot for Metro/Campus medical installations. 50ms ring wrapping. Great if you never want to drop a packet. [medical imaging]

    Keep in mind, OC-768 has been around since the ".com bubble", and is finally starting to see some acceptance. OC-192/10GE deployment is becoming common. IETF/IEEE are ratifying standards for OC-1920 (That's 100gbps)
     
  9. O111111O

    O111111O

    Joined:
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    Messages:
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    Not really. FDDI was never really a WAN technology. More campus/metro Ethernet. Fairly high reliability, token passing, ring healing et al. Also, FDDI was primarily only 100MB, never any implementation for QOS n' such. By today's standards it's fairly useless.

    A similar newer technology (RPR) is in production in many locations. It utilizes packet-over-SONET (POS) as the bearer, and typically delivers GigEthernet in a ring fashion. See it alot for Metro/Campus medical installations. 50ms ring wrapping. Great if you never want to drop a packet. [medical imaging]

    Keep in mind, OC-768 has been around since the ".com bubble", and is finally starting to see some acceptance. OC-192/10GE deployment is becoming common. IETF/IEEE are ratifying standards for OC-1920 (That's 100gbps)
     
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