Cable Network Tester = Okay ... Router / Direct = NOT Okay

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consultjoseph

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Good day everyone,

Sorry for jumping right into this forum with a question... I'm simply desperate as this has been the case for a month.

My main router is in the ground floor while my personal room is on the 3F (in here, it's GF -> 2F -> 3F). And so, I have made a lan wire (is this the correct term?) to go from GF to 3F. Each end has an RJ45 plug in it.

I have a Network Cable Tester and when I ran both ends, both ends confirm that each wire is working (each shows a GREEN... each wire = the 8 wires inside the lan wire with diff colors). However, when I connect this to any router (have tried two) or directly to a laptop that has a slot, it says there is a connection but no internet.

What might be wrong? The internet on the ground floor is working fine. There is no tears on the wire either when I check it. Would appreciate very much any help!

If this helps, each floor is approximately 12 feet and since I put this on top of 3F, inside the room and then down, the wire is now like 45 - 50 feet long.
 

zx10guy

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Unless you have an actual Ethernet cable tester, you don't know. The cable tester you have just does continuity checks on the 8 pins. It's extremely basic and will not do a full on performance test. An actual tester from a company such as Fluke will cost hundreds to a couple of thousand dollars.

But to start with the simple part, did you terminate the RJ45 ends following either the T568A or T568B standard?
 

Fireflycph

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Did you, as zx10guy said, use either T568A or T568B standard when making the cable? If you did a straight-thru you won't get a decent connection at speed above 10Mb Half-Duplex. If at all. Here's a pic of how to use either standard in a cable.
 

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consultjoseph

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Dec 4, 2020
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Unless you have an actual Ethernet cable tester, you don't know. The cable tester you have just does continuity checks on the 8 pins. It's extremely basic and will not do a full on performance test. An actual tester from a company such as Fluke will cost hundreds to a couple of thousand dollars.

But to start with the simple part, did you terminate the RJ45 ends following either the T568A or T568B standard?
I didn't know that... thank you! I will redo the end pins and see if they work.

Sorry a complete newb here, what do you mean by terminating ends? Do you mean using the crimping tool?

What is the IP address of the laptop?
Thanks for the response but I don't understand what you mean by IP address here.

Did you, as zx10guy said, use either T568A or T568B standard when making the cable? If you did a straight-thru you won't get a decent connection at speed above 10Mb Half-Duplex. If at all. Here's a pic of how to use either standard in a cable.
Sorry, what's a straight-thru? Noted on your picture, will retry it using this one. Thank you.
 

TechGuy

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That image might be a little confusing. You want to make sure you're using either the 568A standard or 568B, but not both. Both ends of your cable should be crimped to the same standard (unless you're making a crossover cable). In my experience, 568B is the most common in the US.
 

Fireflycph

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You want to make sure you're using either the 568A standard or 568B
My bad. I should have specified that you can use either on the cable but that both ends MUST be the same. Either A or B. Which one chosen doesn't matter, as long as they're the same.
 

Fireflycph

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Sorry, what's a straight-thru?
A straight-thru is basically where all the strands pairs are laid side by side. Like blue/Blue-White, Orange/Orange-White etc. If you notice on the picture, strand 3 and 6 are separated from each other. Probably not the best choice of words to describe it. But all I can think of right now.
 

zx10guy

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To add a little more color to the explanation of straight through and crossover, it ties into what each of the individual wires do. Some are transmit. Some are receive. So it's important to ensure the transmit and receive wires correspond to the correct pins at the Ethernet jack. The pinouts on network devices such as switches and routers have been set up to accommodate the use of straight through cabling when connecting client devices. The problem occurs when you connect two network devices together which then requires a crossover cable to adjust for the flipped pinouts.

Now a days, the need for crossover cabling is pretty much negated because of the implementation of MDI/MDI-X where the electronics will adjust for the use of either straight through or crossover cabling.

But as others have pointed out, it's good practice to just wire a patch cord to be straight through.
 
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