Cables for a router?

Status
This thread has been Locked and is not open to further replies. Please start a New Thread if you're having a similar issue. View our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

celsius

Thread Starter
Joined
Sep 17, 2008
Messages
5
I am getting a new router http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Router (gigabit, draft N, wireless), however I want to connect some machines, wired. Do I need a cat5 or a cat5E patch cable type? Can anyone also recommend a good shop to buy cables http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cable ? Also I need my cable company to come in and extend the cable that goes to the cable modem http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cable_modem , so it can be moved to the other side of the room. (I know that I should not extend the existing cable with a connector). My current speed supposedly is 10 Mbps.

If I am wrong - please set me straight. Thanks in advance, deb</div>
 

JohnWill

Retired Moderator
Joined
Oct 19, 2002
Messages
106,429
Yep, a plain patch cable is what you need. No point in buying anything less than CAT5e, that's pretty much the "low end" nowadays.

Actually, you can use a barrel and connect a good quality coax like RS-6U onto that coax connection and move it where you need it, no reason to pay the cable company for a simple task like that.

As far as a shop to buy cables, are you speaking on-line or local? Also, it would be helpful to tell us what country you're in...
 

celsius

Thread Starter
Joined
Sep 17, 2008
Messages
5
Yep, a plain patch cable is what you need. No point in buying anything less than CAT5e, that's pretty much the "low end" nowadays.

Actually, you can use a barrel and connect a good quality coax like RS-6U onto that coax connection and move it where you need it, no reason to pay the cable company for a simple task like that.

As far as a shop to buy cables, are you speaking on-line or local? Also, it would be helpful to tell us what country you're in...
Thank you for quick reply. I'll go with Cat5e (I notice that one can buy either shielded or non-shielded - is one preferable?).

I'm in the US and I see several web sites that sell cables.

I don't know for sure that my cable company / ISP used RG6 on the cable from the street to my cable modem box (maybe it could have been an older type, RG59) - but I assume that even if this is true, I can use RG6, and mix them? I also assume 75 ohms. I'll get a male/male coax patch cable.

Deb

</div>
 

JohnWill

Retired Moderator
Joined
Oct 19, 2002
Messages
106,429
Non-shielded will be fine for almost any environment, no reason to spend for shielded.

As long as it's 75 ohm coax, you can mix them, and RG-6 is far lower loss than RG-59, which really isn't used much for cable Internet anymore.
 

celsius

Thread Starter
Joined
Sep 17, 2008
Messages
5
One last question, and thanks mucho for all your help.

I am getting a dual 2 Ghz / 5 Ghz router - if I have multiple wired pcs / Macs, using both frequencies, could that set up a situation where the benefit of increased shielding from interference, merit the several dollar extra cost of shielded cat5e?
</div>
 

JohnWill

Retired Moderator
Joined
Oct 19, 2002
Messages
106,429
Not really. Shielded CAT5 is only really beneficial in a high noise environment like an industrial site. You'll see no benefit in the typical residential setting. In all the time I've been doing this, I've only run across one site where shielded CAT5 actually solved a problem, and that was a factory that had all sorts of high energy electrical fields next to the cable runs. Most businesses like offices run standard CAT5 (unshielded) for their networks.

I can't imagine you needing the shielded cable.
 
Status
This thread has been Locked and is not open to further replies. Please start a New Thread if you're having a similar issue. View our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 1)

As Seen On
As Seen On...

Welcome to Tech Support Guy!

Are you looking for the solution to your computer problem? Join our site today to ask your question. This site is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations.

If you're not already familiar with forums, watch our Welcome Guide to get started.

Join over 807,865 other people just like you!

Latest posts

Staff online

Members online

Top