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Can someone explain images that disappear

Discussion in 'Digital Photography & Imaging' started by titleman, Nov 6, 2007.

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  1. titleman

    titleman Thread Starter

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    We have thousands of tiff images that we scanned from old books. Our State requires us to keep the books because according to them the images are not stable and can and has disappeared.

    My question is: If an image disappeared on my hard drive would my backup on another computer, cd or a flash drive still be there.

    I can't create the situation so I'm looking for someone with experience in this area.

    Thanks
     
  2. fairnooks

    fairnooks Banned

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    If by backup you mean there is a program running that automatically backs up your hard drive to the backup destination (other hard drive, flash, cd) its either the medium or the backup program settings that dictate. First medium; CD, once they are back up to a permanent medium they are there no matter what happens to your original information. The cd can be destroyed physically or lose its thermal "set" if its left in direct sunshine but it is not dependent on whether you lose the original data or not.

    For hard drive and flash there are settings in most automated backup programs for different types of backup. All the append or simple copy backups just add any new files from your source files to the backup without ever deleting anything on the backup.

    Sycronization backups however can usually be set up in two ways. One is to copy any new files from the source drive to the backup drive and also copy any "new" files from the backup to your source drive without ever deleting any file. So if you did delete a file by accident from your drive, the next time the backup ran, you would have the most recently backed up version of that file back on your hard drive again.
    The second method of sycronization is to make an exact copy sycronization and in this case if you lost or deleted something on your hard drive and the backup software were to run before you got the file back, it would also delete it from the backup drive.

    There are all sorts of variations based on file versions and time stamps but those are the basics. If you were just wondering about a manual backup retaining your files if you deleted one from your hard drive, yes, they would all still be there in the backup because that's just a simple copy as described above except that its static.
     
  3. SB305

    SB305

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    You can do a lot of Googling on the anticipated useable lifespan of computer media. From what I've read, unless you use tape drives, the most reliable you can choose is a hard drive and, even then, you should not count on it's lasting longer than five years.
     
  4. Gerard58

    Gerard58

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    Information stored on Hard disk that are left there for a long time with out been used, will fade after time. What will slow this down is the environment that you store your copies in. It must be dry and kept at a stable temperature, away from strong magnetic fields such as Mobile phones, old TV and microwave. Also, backup are so easy to do, You must setup a calendar month to back up and also a calendar year after say four years to move then on to new hard disk. Once you set this in stone, You are safe. It is the moving from one location to another location on the hard disk that stops the magnetic material on the hard disk from fading. The reason for moving onto new hard disks is for wear and tare. I would say, have at lease six backups in different locations. That’s no problem now with the internet. In addition, the standard now for text files is PDF. All governments worldwide use it. You can also use it for pictures that are in the books you are recording which in most cases are printed anyway. Searchable PDF is the same size as tiff. However, it allows you to search for word by word later in the scanned files. TIFF Is only used for very fine detail, such as Pictures. The good news is all scanners, scan in tiff and it can be converted to PDF by Adobe software such as Acrobat Pro 6 on wards. Look up there web site.

    Backing up important files is not a file and forget thing. There is a hidden maintains cost, such as the building, environment and labour. CD/DVD are not excepted as a safe way to store things, as you must be able to see if the material is still intact and where there is a vast amount of information such as government files this is not particle with them. Hard disks are still used today worldwide and if you can show them the above setup you should have know problem. Hope this helps.
     
  5. Gerard58

    Gerard58

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    Sorry. If you did not make new backup on top of your old backup on your hard disk. then yes they would be there. That if after four to five years in a good environment. Your best bet is to try checking on your CD as in most cases you can only Wright once to them.
     
  6. Knotbored

    Knotbored

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    How old are the books and how long does the government require you to keep them available?
    Usually 7 years of detail is all that is necessary. For that period two CD copies stored in different distant places would be a logical storage. ( different cities to avoid catastrophy like flood or fire.)
    For periods longer then that (permanent or museum storage ) its unlikely any new technology will be available to read stored images , for example old data stored on 8" disks in 1960 or on 8 track tapes. Note even your handwritten books will fade and paper will degrade with time.
     
  7. cwwozniak

    cwwozniak Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    People probably wished for 8 inch discs back in 1960. :D :D

    I believe the typical disc drive of that era had multiple 24 inch (or so) diameter coated metal platters spinning in a sealed enclosure.
     
  8. titleman

    titleman Thread Starter

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    The original books were made in 1948. They contain an index of all the deeds, mortgage and miscellaneous records that have been filed against the land in my county. The books, or a equivalent thereof, must be kept forever.

    Thanks everyone for the input
     
  9. CamHound

    CamHound

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    titleman, before the availability of "digital" options, were these backed up via microfilm/fiche, and if so, is that capability still available? While not as elegant and modern as scanning and saving to files, duplicate archival film copies (stored in geographically-separate locations for the reasons given in other posts) are still one of the best options in terms of longevity and legal acceptance, albeit with the associated financial and environmental costs. Also, because the retrieval of the imagery is a mainly opto-mechanical exercise, there's less chance of "losing" the data due to technological obsolescence.
     
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