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Can you please tell me how to increase and decrease a preset

Discussion in 'Windows 7' started by jcrunning, Apr 11, 2016.

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  1. jcrunning

    jcrunning Thread Starter

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    Friends,


    Can you please tell me how to increase and decrease a preset internal hard drive with programs already installed in the set C: drive location and move it so I can install new programs in without affecting the opening of the program?

    What I am trying to say is , Example When I installed window 7 long time ago on my computer. I have only one internal a 120GB HD on the C: drive. That was example set partition 80 for C; and created D: drive 40 GB from the original one drive. I installed programs in before that is now filled up almost all of drive C: 80GB partitioned. If I move (some) of the preinstalled program to D: drive will the moved programs stop working? Some program demand to be installed to only C: or it will not install at all.
     
  2. DaveA

    DaveA Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    Being that you have a small drive I would look into getting a much larger one. Rebuild the system with the new drive as C.
    Then your data can be also on the C drive in a clean Windows install.
    After you have find that you have ALL of your data restored, the you can format the old drive use it for archives or what ever.

    I am NOT one to use default storage to a second drive or partition.
     
  3. kenbok51

    kenbok51

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    What I have done before was to move the programs install directory to the new drive and then change all of the shortcuts to the new location. For instance, if I want to move say a video converter program from C > Program Files (or C > Program File (x86) to my D or E drive I first create a folder on the new drive named Program Files or Program Files (x86) depending on where the original program was installed. Then I copy and paste the programs directory to the new location and rename the original so it can't be found. Afterwords I find the shortcuts that you would use to launch the program (on the desktop or in the start menu) and right click properties and change the two paths from C to D - E or what ever the drive letter is. Naming the program file folders the same on the new drive makes it easy to just change the Drive Letter in the paths properties Target and Start in locations. Some programs also have their paths listed in the registry so it will not work for all of them but most should be fine (I do this with installed games all the time). Then since I have renamed the original so it can not be found if the program runs ok, I can delete the original directory. It's best to test before you delete or at least create a restore point or full drive backup to an external drive. Many installed program directories are small enough to copy to a CD or CD-RW disk for safe keeping as well if you do not do full back ups so you can at least get back to where you were if something goes wrong.
     
  4. jcrunning

    jcrunning Thread Starter

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    kenbok51 + Friends, you are all so cool. Thanks regardless work or not for all the trouble you all trying to help me.
     
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