1. Computer problem? Tech Support Guy is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations. Click here to join today! If you're new to Tech Support Guy, we highly recommend that you visit our Guide for New Members.

Can't Get rpm packages to install

Discussion in 'Linux and Unix' started by gadfly, Oct 15, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Advertisement
  1. gadfly

    gadfly Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2002
    Messages:
    48
    I've downloaded two packages recommended for monitoring security.

    One is LogSentry 1.1.1. 1.i686 -
    the other PortSentry 1.1-7 i386

    I found these through the rpmfind.net search.

    I'm running RedHat 9.

    They download fine. I store them in my home directory - as general 'user' - I go to the directory and right click and choose 'install'. I'm cued for my 'root password' then once this is entered it brings up a window that says "system update" "this may take a while". When the progress bar is about 1/2 way through this window just disappears - and I'm left with the uninstalled packages still sitting there.

    I've even tried to install these from directly within 'root' - still with the same result.

    Is there something I'm doing wrong? Is there another way of installing which I should be using?

    Advice greatly appreciated

    Thanks

    Gadfly
     
  2. Whiteskin

    Whiteskin

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2002
    Messages:
    1,964
    Have you tired using the terminal. That may give you a better idea of what is going on, that and if you specify the verbose option. see the man page for more information.
     
  3. gizard

    gizard

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2003
    Messages:
    5
    Hi,
    You can use the CLI (or terminal) to login to root.

    use the command su like this:
    go to K | Terminal | Gnome-Terminal (or any other)

    you will be presented with

    [email protected] user/#

    type in:

    [email protected] user/# su
    password

    Enter the password for the root acount.
    Now go to the location of your RPM by using the cd command

    [email protected] user/# cd /home/username/dir-that-was-the-rpm
    [email protected] user/# rpm ipq *.rpm

    This will produce a list showing if the package will install or if any other dependances need to be pre-installed.

    If this dies then it is the rpm that is curpt.

    Gizard :D
     
  4. gadfly

    gadfly Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2002
    Messages:
    48
    Good info - I'll check it out.

    I did notice that one of the downloads left files in a couple spots - yet the thing doesn't seem to be running. If the first install attempt failed due to corruption would this effect subsequent install (even other rpm's)?

    Also - (and this I'm sure is a really dumb question - but I can't help it:confused: ). A lot of people leave advise about checking the 'man' files. I confess - I don't know how to do this. I found them browsing once - tried to open with a text file (in desperation) but some of the characters were in odd symbols - so I must have gotten the wrong files. So if I could have "an idiots guide to reading man files" I'd appreciate it.

    Thanks

    Gadfly
     
  5. Whiteskin

    Whiteskin

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2002
    Messages:
    1,964
    type in man then space then the command. It will give you a plethora of information on that command. They will become your best friend!
     
  6. gadfly

    gadfly Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2002
    Messages:
    48
    Thanks for the prompt reply Whiteskin (y)

    - it will help a lot now that I know how to access the man pages. I was missing out on a lot of vital info.

    Gadfly
     
  7. Whiteskin

    Whiteskin

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2002
    Messages:
    1,964
    cool! Some times the distro you use will also post a collection of man pages on the interent, so if you cant boot your computer, you may still be able to get man pages.
     
  8. gadfly

    gadfly Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2002
    Messages:
    48
    Hope you guys don't mind that I'm chaining questions here - but you spoke of using the terminal - I've noticed that I have an option of screen session, linux console, root console and shell. What exactly are the differences - and in that - which one would I most appropriately use for doing commands - like the 'su' etc.

    Thanks

    Gadfly
     
  9. Whiteskin

    Whiteskin

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2002
    Messages:
    1,964
    It depends. More often than not you can get away with doing nearly enything inside of a terminal emulater (xterm, kterm, Eterm, Aterm etc. ) I cant think of a situation now, but i am certain that there are instances in which one would have to run a program right from the console.

    I'd run most programs that use x, but need root acess with a program like xsu, or gnome su.
     
  10. Sponsor

As Seen On
As Seen On...

Welcome to Tech Support Guy!

Are you looking for the solution to your computer problem? Join our site today to ask your question. This site is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations.

If you're not already familiar with forums, watch our Welcome Guide to get started.

Join over 733,556 other people just like you!

Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Short URL to this thread: https://techguy.org/172189

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice