Can't install over 512megs SDRAM?

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Daniel Davis

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Someone told me today that I'd be wasting my money to buy more than 512megs SDRAM for my pc, which is a 500+ mhz pc. He said something about the motherboard probably not supporting it...and win98se having problems with it. Right now, I have 512megs in it. Was going to buy 2 512meg sticks. Not?
 

Daniel Davis

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I keep 4 or so programs active at once...Word Perfect 9, Paradox 9, my scheduling software, PaperPort, and a file manager. The resource meter starts out the day with 2 green bars..but as I use the system...it leaks down to one yellow one. Is there anything I can do short of rebooting once in awhile to get the green bars back? I have a pc 500+mhz system with 512megs.
 

Max19

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Windows 95, 98, 98SE, and ME do not fully utilize more than about 512MB of RAM. In fact, more memory than that can cause problems. Those operating systems were just never designed to use that much memory.

Unless you plan to upgrade to Windows 2000 or Windows XP you would be wasting your money purchasing more memory. You should also check your motherboard manual to see what the maximum amount of memory it can support is. Some motherboards won't function at all if you exceed that amount.
 
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Q: I just filled my RAM slots with 768MB of RAM. Now my
system doesn't work right and locks up.

A: You're running into a problem with Windows or the limitations of
your PC's BIOS. Windows 95, 98, 98 SE, and Me aren't designed to
work with more than 512MB of RAM. (Windows NT, 2000, and XP
don't have this limitation.) If you run into this problem, check out
this workaround. http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/Q253/9/12.ASP

Some older motherboards aren't designed to take 256MB and 512MB
RAM modules. Check your manual or your PC manufacturer's Web
site; sometimes a BIOS upgrade solves the problem.

==================================================

Tons Of RAM = Memory Hell?"
http://www.langa.com/newsletters/2001/2001-06-18.htm#4

Over 512 megs ram problem
http://www.sysopt.com/forum/Forum2/HTML/017945.html

ram restrictions on OS's?
http://www.sysopt.com/forum/Forum1/HTML/013815.html
 

Daniel Davis

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Man...are you good!

Originally posted by Max19
Windows 95, 98, 98SE, and ME do not fully utilize more than about 512MB of RAM. In fact, more memory than that can cause problems. Those operating systems were just never designed to use that much memory.

Unless you plan to upgrade to Windows 2000 or Windows XP you would be wasting your money purchasing more memory. You should also check your motherboard manual to see what the maximum amount of memory it can support is. Some motherboards won't function at all if you exceed that amount.
 

Daniel Davis

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You mentioned using resource meter, which measures free system resources, a very small chunk of RAM. You can have plenty of free RAM and still have low system resources. Recently, a friend of mine was considering an upgrade from 256 MB to 512, but after I had a look at what he was running, I found that what he really needed was some optimization. Now, he has an average of over 100 MB free, without the upgrade.

Perhaps one of those apps you're running is a resource hog, or there may be one of more resource-intensive items loading at startup. If you haven't checked and slim-lined your startup group (including the registry run keys), I would do that, using msconfig or a utility such as Startup Control Panel (see
http://www.ematic.com/techpost/files )

You can also get a utility from the above page for optimizing your vcache settings etc., and permanently increasing the average amount of free RAM.
 

Daniel Davis

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The programs I keep running all the time are:

1. Word Perfect 9
2. Paradox 9
3. Office Hours Pro (Client scheduling program)
4. PowerDesk Pro (File handler)
5. Paperport (Sometimes)
6. Cheyenne Bitware (fax software)

I saw an article once that said something about finding out what programs are auto-loading by control-alt-delete. There's quite a list that pops up. How can I tell which are attached to which software?

Originally posted by ajb1
You mentioned using resource meter, which measures free system resources, a very small chunk of RAM. You can have plenty of free RAM and still have low system resources. Recently, a friend of mine was considering an upgrade from 256 MB to 512, but after I had a look at what he was running, I found that what he really needed was some optimization. Now, he has an average of over 100 MB free, without the upgrade.

Perhaps one of those apps you're running is a resource hog, or there may be one of more resource-intensive items loading at startup. If you haven't checked and slim-lined your startup group (including the registry run keys), I would do that, using msconfig or a utility such as Startup Control Panel (see
http://www.ematic.com/techpost/files )

You can also get a utility for optimizing your vcache, etc. and permanently increasing the amount of free RAM.
 
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To get a list of everything loading at startup go to start/run/type msconfig and press enter, go to the start up tab, that is everything that loads. Uncheck what you don't want, if you unsure go to start/run/type msinfo32 and press enter, go to the left hand frame software environment, expand it, choose startup programs. Go to edit menu, choose select all, back to edit menu, choose copy, then paste the list back into this thread for others to look at and help you decided what not to load.
 
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You could also use a utility to help clear RAM when you need it. There is a good one called GoodMEM from MSI. I use it and it is simple and runs in the background and was free. You just click on it and clear the amount of RAM you want. It works well for me, you could try that if you are still worried about running low on RAM. I couldn't find it on the MSI site but if your are interested I can EMAIL it to you.
 
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I think the jury is still out on the value of RAM-boosting utilities. I wonder how many of them do more harm than good, and end up causing frequently-accessed data to be paged out to the swap file, resulting in a performance drop. They also do nothing to fix a shortage of system resources. They may be Ok if you need an occasional spurt of extra free memory, but if you rely on them because you often have a shortage, then there's an obvious need to optimize or add additional RAM. And then there's the question of whether or not some of these utilities themselves tap more system resources than they're worth.
 

Max19

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I would definitely advise against any type of utility to boost RAM performance or usage. Either purchase more RAM or optimize your use of resources. Third-party utilities often cause more harm than good.
 
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Win98 can use up to a Gig of RAM as efficiently as any other operating system. If you install over 512Mb it is a good idea to limit the amount it can cache to 512Mb, but it is rare to ever actually cache over that anyway. There is often a MB limit of 512Mb, and you might well have that limit with a 500Mhz processor.

All that being said, there is no way you need over 512Mb RAM with the programs you are running.

As others have pointed out, resources have nothing to do with how much RAM you have. Adding RAM does not affect resources in Win 98.

After trimming your startup group in msconfig/startup, I think the next step in controlling the kind of resource problem you are experiencing is to update your software. Often a responsible vendor will correct a resource hogging problem with an update. Try having Updates.com check out your system. It will link you to the updates you need: http://updates.cnet.com/

If your resources are still being dragged down after you update everything you have to keep track yourself of what is hogging the resources. I like to have TClockEX display a two digit readout of my user resources to the left of my clock. The digital readout gives a much more accurate picture than the resource meter. The resource meter will give you a digital readout if you hover the cursor over it, but it is a pain to try to keep track of what is going on that way. I eliminated the month, year and seconds to make it more compact, then added the resource display to the left of the clock: http://users.iafrica.com/d/da/dalen/tclockex.htm The yellow bar running across the top displays CPU use which is handy and the green one across the bottom displays RAM use which is mostly useless.

Those Mem/RAM/Boost/Turbo type RAM recovery programs were written for Win95 where they were useful, but are counterproductive in Win98. They have nothing to do with resource problems anyway.
 

Daniel Davis

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Joined
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Messages
100
What are "system resources"? What's the difference between that and ram?


Originally posted by ajb1
You mentioned using resource meter, which measures free system resources, a very small chunk of RAM. You can have plenty of free RAM and still have low system resources. Recently, a friend of mine was considering an upgrade from 256 MB to 512, but after I had a look at what he was running, I found that what he really needed was some optimization. Now, he has an average of over 100 MB free, without the upgrade.

Perhaps one of those apps you're running is a resource hog, or there may be one of more resource-intensive items loading at startup. If you haven't checked and slim-lined your startup group (including the registry run keys), I would do that, using msconfig or a utility such as Startup Control Panel (see
http://www.ematic.com/techpost/files )

You can also get a utility from the above page for optimizing your vcache settings etc., and permanently increasing the average amount of free RAM.
 
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