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cascading routers, or another solution to distance problem

Discussion in 'Networking' started by Kevelme, Oct 10, 2008.

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  1. Kevelme

    Kevelme Thread Starter

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    Hello, this is my first post: Well, I know a some of the jargon, but not much about networking; which is why I'm here.

    I live in a large old boarding house (manage, maintenance); 2 floors thick horse hair plaster walls, cast iron piping, radiators. 20 rooms (not all have computer users), The building has had additions added over the years, since it was built in 1700's the lasy last one was b in the 1920'sWe have one trunk Comcast Cable Internet account.

    There are 2 main houses separated by a common area, and kitchen. our router (Linksys SB5120) is close to one side of the house, we have bosters (3 Liknsys/Cisco WRE54G) one on the second floor of the house section close to router and the same devices on both floor of the longer distance. Still; they lose signal often.

    Can we run about 60-90 feet of cat 5 from one of the main router's 4 ports through floor accross the basemeant router (Linkyis WRT54GS) and give that side of the house some dependable service (A network ajoined to ours, or an independant WiFi Network, is a secont n). The Geek Squad was here and said "No, don't do that and left"

    Yeah, we need some suggestions here, at least something to try. Reseting the router and modem, takes everyone off line! Thanx, Kevelme
     
  2. nvr.bck.from.mac

    nvr.bck.from.mac

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    okay... whichever geek squad guy was there is stupid and doesn't know anything about networks and wifi signals. you can tell him i said that too. there's always a way to work in a network, even into a large old house. you just have to do it the right way, and he probably wasn't wanting to put in the time to set it up for you.

    one easy solution, which may not be the best, is to just get another couple boosters and place them half way between the router and the other boosters that aren't getting signals. it'd be a close call, but that should work okay, i think. you may loose a bit of signal quality and a little internet speed with the distance, but it'd be a simple enough solution. may not be the best for quality, but easy nonetheless.


    another solution... you definitely could also do like you were thinking and run the 60-90 foot cord across to the other side but then add a new couple routers rather than the boosters. the routers will put out a stronger signal than the boosters. i would even use up your 4 ports on your main router and run two out to the other side (one for upstairs and one for down) and then run one up through the ceiling and one out into the middle on the bottom floor. so you'll basically have the far four corners of the whole place covered with the routers. (two upstairs and two downstairs). and the center covered by the one in the center.
    the booster idea was a decent idea, but the routers will definitely serve you better. they'll have a much much stronger signal as long as you keep them hardwired to the main router and the modem via the ethernet cables. and you can save the boosters in case someone complains they still can't get a good signal. it's always good to have a backup for the people furthest away from the routers.

    the only downfall i can see with this plan is that you'll have to go in and set up each router. each one will have to have a different name and give of it's own wifi signal. but it'll definitely be the most efficient and most reliable. if you really want to you can have your internet company come out and set up each router after you get them in place. it shouldn't be incredibly difficult to set up yourself though. and you can always come back to this site with your questions. or even send me a personal message and ask me about it.

    that's a lot to take in, but i don't see why it wouldn't work.
     
  3. nvr.bck.from.mac

    nvr.bck.from.mac

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    okay, so here are a couple routers that will definitely work for my 5-router suggestion. they're a little cheaper than the 4-ethernet-port/wireless routers, because they're not combos like that, they're strictly wireless, they just need an ethernet connection to the modem so they can get the internet from somewhere.


    http://www.linksys.com/servlet/Sate...nksys/Common/VisitorWrapper&lid=1577639789B01

    http://www.linksys.com/servlet/Sate...nksys/Common/VisitorWrapper&lid=5171639789B01

    http://www.linksys.com/servlet/Sate...nksys/Common/VisitorWrapper&lid=8228139789B02


    i might recommend which ever one is newest. and you definitely are welcome to research wireless routers on your own, and find a better deal. these are straight off the linksys/cisco website, so they should be compatable with the main router you've already got. i don't imagine any other router would have any issues with compatibility though. but these routers (or similar ones) would be best because they're good quality. if you get a cheap one somewhere you might not get the signal range you would with this one. but feel free to look around a bit too, there might be a better router that i didn't find.

    you may also want to have comcast come out and set up another router on the other side so you don't lose your internet speed-quality with the super long ethernet/cat-5 cables. and then you can run a cord through the ceiling to the upstairs with another router. (to clarify... that would make two modems, one on each side of the complex, and four routers, two hooked straight into the modem and one router hooked to each of those for the upstairs) and maybe one or two boosters for the center common area if you have low signals in there.
     
  4. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    Terry
    Definitely the best solution, if you can run cables, is to run cables to strategic areas around that big ol' house and place wireless access points or secondary routers at those places. If you use routers (often less expensive than comparable wireless access points) you connect them per the below recipe. Use different channels (e.g., 1, 6 and 11 in North America) so the Wi-Fi networks do not interfere with each other. You can use the same or different SSID on each.

    JohnWill's procedure (Aug. 30, 2008) for configuring a secondary router as a switch and, optionally, wireless access point follows.

    Connecting two (or more) SOHO broadband routers together.

    Note: The "primary" router can be an actual router, a software gateway like Microsoft Internet Connection Sharing, or a server connection that has the capability to supply more than one IP address using DHCP server capability. No changes are made to the primary "router" configuration.

    Configure the IP address of the secondary router(s) to be in the same subnet as the primary router, but out of the range of the DHCP server in the primary router. For instance DHCP server addresses 192.168.0.2 through 192.168.0.100, I'd assign the secondary router 192.168.0.254 as it's IP address, 192.168.0.253 for another router, etc.

    Note: Do this first, as you will have to reboot the computer to connect to the router again for the remaining changes.

    Disable the DHCP server in the secondary router.

    Setup the wireless section just the way you would if it was the primary router, channels, encryption, etc.

    Connect from the primary router's LAN port to one of the LAN ports on the secondary router. If there is no uplink port and neither of the routers have auto-sensing ports, use a cross-over cable. [You will not need a cross-over cable if one of the "routers" is a computer.] Leave the WAN port unconnected!

    This procedure bypasses the routing function (NAT layer) and configures the router as a switch (or wireless access point for wireless routers).

    For reference, here's a link to a Typical example config using a Netgear router
     
  5. nvr.bck.from.mac

    nvr.bck.from.mac

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    wow... good job...

    i know i get what you're saying terrynet, but that's a lot of jargon that kevelme probably won't need at this point. (remember how kevelme's experience says "networking??" ... ) which probably means you'll have to go a bit less complex and leave out words like "nat layer" and "subnet".

    it's all useful info that you're giving. just remember that kevelme doesn't know as much as you do about networking.
     
  6. tek guy

    tek guy

    Joined:
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    Your router is Linksys/Cisco WRE54G? or is WRT54G?
    Do want to cascade the three routers? As Terry advised, you have to logged in to the router's configuration page of the Linksys and you have to change LAN IP address of the secondary router to 192.168.1.254 because the common IP address of the Linksys router is 192.168.1.1 so we have to range it. and then the third router will be 192.168.1.253. After that the secondary router will be connected to the LAN port of the Primary router (which means from the LAN#4 of the router primary router going to the LAN#4 of the secondary router), and then you have to get another Ethernet cable to connect it to the LAN port of the secondary going to the LAN port of the third router (which means from LAN#3 of the secondary router going to the LAN#4 of the third router).
     
  7. Kevelme

    Kevelme Thread Starter

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    :eek: So much thanks to you guys so far. I have the two routers that I've mentioned to work with along with the plug in boosters. The issue (problem) has been left to me as is, there'll be no purchasing of extra hardware except Cat5 cable. So, if I'm understanding, I should try the LAN to LAN solution. "Patch?" Regular Cat5 or different? Or don't have to worry about the dif when going for this solution.

    I'm undrstanding that: When I do this, as discribed, I am just extending the existing network, not creating a new one is that correct? I will just be using a hard wire (Cat5) cable to connect router #1 to Router #2 to widen the reception area of the primary router. And the plug in the wall boosters will sync with Router #2?

    Whatever I do, I need to be very careful, if I screw up what we have for a hetwork at this point. I'll have several peved 'puter users all over me like cheap suits.
     
  8. tek guy

    tek guy

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    Dec 30, 2006
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    Yes that is correct. You are using the wireless capability of the routers that you have to get a good wireless connection. One thing, you can create three network name on your router and make sure that the DHCP server for the secondary and the third router are disabled. By the way a regular Ethernet cable or Cat5 from the router going to the LAN port of the routers.
     
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